Dogs: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
CA - Pet Store - Chapter 9. Pet Store Animal Care Act CA HLTH & S § 122350 - 122361

This  law requires pet store operators to maintain the facility in good repair, provide proper care to animals, and clean grooming areas daily. Primary enclosures must be structurally sound, provide adequate space, be water-proof, and protect from injury. The law mandates that dogs and cats must be over eight weeks of age and weaned prior to sale. Pet store operators must ensure that veterinary records are documented in writing. Violations may be considered an infraction or a misdemeanor.

CA - Rabies - Chapter 1. Rabies Control. CA HLTH & S § 121575 - § 121710

This chapter of California laws deals with rabies control.

CA - Racing - § 597h. Live animals; attaching to power propelled device to be pursued by dogs CA PENAL § 597h

This statute makes it unlawful to tie, attach, or fasten any live animal to any machine or device propelled by any power for the purpose of causing such animal to be pursued by a dog or dogs.

CA - Service Animal - § 600. Horses or dogs used by peace officers; willful and malicious harm or interference; punishment; rest CA PENAL § 600

This statute makes it an offense to willfully, maliciously and with no legal justification harm, injure, obstruct, or interfere with a horse or dog under the supervision of law enforcement in the discharge of official duties or a volunteer under the direct supervision of a peace officer. Violations are punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment. Punishment depends on the seriousness of the injury to the animal. Upon conviction, a defendant must also pay restitution for damages.

CA - Service Animal - § 600.2. Allowing dog to injure or kill guide, signal or service dog; punishment; restitution CA PENAL § 600.2

It is unlawful for any person to permit any dog he or she owns or controls to injure or kill any service dog while the service dog is in discharge of its duties. A violation is an infraction punishable by a fine if the injury is caused by the person's failure to exercise ordinary care. A violation is a misdemeanor if the injury is caused by reckless disregard in the exercise of control over his or her dog. A violation in this case shall be punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment. Upon conviction, the defendant shall make restitution, including veterinary bills and replacement costs.

CA - Service Animal - § 600.5. Intentional injury to, or death of, guide, signal or service dog; penalty; restitution CA PENAL § 600.5

Any person who intentionally causes injury to or the death of any service dog, while the dog is in discharge of its duties, is guilty of a misdemeanor. punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment. Upon conviction, a defendant must make restitution to the person with a disability who has custody or ownership of the dog for any veterinary bills and replacement costs of the dog if it is disabled or killed.

CA - Slaughter - § 598b. Animals commonly kept as pets or companions; use as food; violation; exceptions CA PENAL § 598b

This statute makes it a misdemeanor to possess, import into, or export from, California, sell, buy, give away, or accept any carcass of any animal commonly kept as a pet with the intent of using any part of that carcass for food.  It is also a misdemeanor to possess, import, export, buy, sell, give away or accept a common pet animal with the intent of killing it for food.

California General Laws of 1913: Title 14: Section 596-599f Cal. Penal Code §§ 597 - 599f (1913)

The General Laws of California from 1913, title 14, covers Malicious Mischief which includes sections concerning: Cruelty to Animals, Poisoning of Cattle, killing of birds in cemeteries and killing of gulls or cranes.  The Cruelty to Animal section describes laws concerning horses, abandoned animal, torture and maiming of animals, use of animals in fights, and arrest without warrants.  In addition, the section covers evidence, stallions, and impounding without food and water.  The section about the killing of birds in the cemetery concerns also killing and detaining of homing pigeons.  The last section about killing of gulls and cranes also concerns the destruction of eggs and nests.  In addition, the section covers killing of elk and prosecution for these offenses.

Canada - Alberta - Dangerous Dogs Act R.S.A. 2000, c. D-3, s. 1

This set of laws comprises the Alberta, Canada Dangerous Dog Act. Under the Act, a justice may take a complaint that a dog has bitten or attempted to bite a person, or that a dog is dangerous and not kept under proper control. In either circumstance, if it appears to the justice that the dog ought to be destroyed, the justice shall direct a peace officer to destroy it. Additionally, a person who fails to comply with an order under this section is guilty of an offence and liable to a fine of not more than $5 for each day during which the person fails to comply with the order.

Canada - Alberta - Service Dogs Act S.A. 2007, c. S-7.5

This Alberta, Canada law provides that no person shall deny to any person the accommodation, services or facilities available in any place to which the public is customarily admitted, or discriminate against any person for the reason that the person is a disabled person accompanied by a service dog or a certified dog-trainer accompanied by a dog in training. The law goes into effect January of 2009.

Canada - B.C. - B.C. Statutes - Vancouver Charter. Part XIV -- Nuisances S.B.C. 1953, c. 55, s. 323 - 324(A)3

These British Columbia, Canada laws provide the laws for preventing, abating, and prohibiting nuisances, which include dangerous dogs. The laws describe what constitutes a dangerous dog and what actions may be taken with a dangerous dog. The set also contains provisions that allow for the creation of by-laws to control and impound animals.

Canada - British Columbia - Division 1 -- Regulation of Animals R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 323, s. 702.1 - 707.1(10)

This set of British Columbia, Canada laws addresses animal control. The provisions give the animal control board the authority to regulate loose animals and licensing of dogs.

Canada - New Brunswick Statutes. Sheep Protection Act R.S.N.B. 1973, c. S-7, s. 1 - 6

This set of New Brunswick laws comprises the Sheep Protection Act. Under the Act, where a sheep is killed or injured by a dog, the owner of the sheep may, within forty-eight hours, notify the Minister. The Minister then appoints an investigator who reports his or her findings back to the Minister. The Minister may then recover the expenses of the investigation from the owner of the dog, and may order the destruction of the dog.

Canada - Northwest Territories Statutes/Nunavut - Dog Act R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. D-7, s. 1

This set of laws comprises the Northwest Territories Dog Act. Under the Act, owners may not allow their dogs to run loose and must provide them with sufficient food and water. Further, the law provides that no person shall punish or abuse a dog in a manner or to an extent that is cruel or unnecessary or drive a dog or dog team on a sidewalk situated on the street or road of a settlement. The law also sets forth the procedure for the impoundment and release of dogs. For the latest version of this Act, see the pdf.

Canada - Nova Scotia Municipal Government Act S.N.S. 1998, c. 18, s. 174 - 179

Certain sections (ss.175-179) of this Nova Scotia statute deal with dog ownership, and the consequences for failing to control a dog, or harm to people or property.

Canada - Ontario - Dog Owners' Liability Act R.S.O. 1990, c. D.16, s. 1 - 20(4)

This Ontario, Canada set of laws comprises the Dog Owners' Liability Act. The main thrust of the law is to establish that an owner is liable for damages if his or her dog bites or attacks another person or domestic animal. Proceedings may be commenced in the Ontario Court of Justice against an owner of a dog if it is alleged that the dog attacked or bitten another person or domestic animal, or if the dog has behaved in a manner that poses a menace to the safety of persons or domestic animals. A court may then order the destruction of the dog, or measures for more effective control of the dog (leash restraint, muzzling, etc.). The Act also bans the owning, breeding, importing, or transferring of pit bull dogs in Ontario, save for dogs grandfathered in before the Act took effect in 2005 (then the dog is a "restricted pit bull" subject to further laws).

Canada - P.E.I. Statutes. Dog Act R.S.P.E.I. 1988, c. D-13 s.1 - 21

This set of laws comprises the Prince Edward Island (PEI) Dog Act. The Act provides that no owner of a dog shall allow his dog to run at large; any dog found at large shall be deemed to have been allowed to be at large by its owner. In addition, the owner of livestock or any enforcement officer authorized by the owner of livestock, may kill a dog that is killing or injuring the owner's livestock, except where the livestock is on property held under lease, license or permit by the owner of the dog. This Act also outlines licensing requirements for dogs as well as impoundment procedures.

Canada - Saskatchewan - Northern Municipailities Act (dangerous animal) S.S. 1983, c. N-5.1, s. 100 - 100.09

Dangerous Dog Laws for Saskatchewan's Northern Municipalities

Canada - Yukon Statutes - Dog Act R.S.Y. 2002, c. 59

This set of laws comprises the Yukon Dog Act. The law provides that an owner must keep his or her dog fed and watered and not punish it to an extent that is cruel or unnecessary. Dogs found at large contrary to the Act are impounded for a period of five days for owners to reclaim them. The Act also states that a person may kill a dog that is running at large in the act of pursuing, worrying, injuring or destroying cattle, horses, sheep, pigs or poultry.

CO - Assistance Animals - Colorado Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws C. R. S. A. § 18-13-107; § 24-34-301; § 24-34-801 - 804; § 42-4-808; § 18-1.3-602; § 18-9-202

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

CO - Dangerous Dog- Article 9. Offenses Against Public Peace, Order, and Decency. C. R. S. A. § 18-9-204.5; C. R. S. A. § 35-42-115

This Colorado statute defines a "dangerous dog" as one that has inflicted bodily or serious bodily injury upon or has caused the death of a person or domestic animal; or has demonstrated tendencies that would cause a reasonable person to believe that the dog may inflict injury upon or cause the death of any person or domestic animal; or has engaged in or been trained for animal fighting as described by statute.  Owners found guilty under the provisions will be subject to misdemeanor penalties if their dogs cause bodily injury or felonies if their dogs cause the death of a person. Section CO ST § 35-42-115 mandates that the bureau create a a statewide dangerous dog registry consisting of a database of information concerning microchip types and placement by veterinarians and licensed shelters in dangerous dogs.

CO - Dog Bite - Civil actions against dog owners. C. R. S. A. § 13-21-124

This 2005 Colorado law makes a dog owner strictly liable for dog bites only if  the victim of the bite suffers serious bodily injury or death from being bitten by a dog while lawfully on public or private property regardless of the viciousness or dangerous propensities of the dog or the dog owner's knowledge or lack of knowledge of the dog's viciousness or dangerous propensities.  Further, the victim is entitled to recover only economic damages (as opposed to noneconomic damages like pain and suffering, inconvenience, etc.)  in a civil suit against the dog owner.   Also, the statute provides that an owner is not liable where the victim is unlawfully on public or private property; where the victim is on the owner's property and the the property is clearly and conspicuously marked with one or more posted signs stating "no trespassing" or "beware of dog"; where the victim has clearly provoked the dog; where the victim is a veterinary health care worker, dog groomer, humane agency staff person, professional dog handler, trainer, or dog show judge acting in the performance of his or her respective duties; or where the dog is working as a hunting dog, herding dog, farm or ranch dog, or predator control dog on the property of or under the control of the dog's owner.

CO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws C. R. S. A. § 35-43-126; § 13-21-124; § 25-4-601 to 615; § 30-15-101 to 105; § 33-3-106; § 33-4-101.3; § 33-6-128; § 35-42.5-101

These Colorado statutes represent the state's dog laws. There are provisions regarding civil actions against dog owners for dog bites, rabies control, animal control and licensing, and pertinent wildlife regulations, such as a general ban on harassing wildlife and destroying dens or nests. However, there is an exception making it permissible to take wildlife when it is causing excessive damage to property.

CO - Domestic Violence - Animals and Domestic Violence; Definition. CO ST § 18-6-800.3

This statute includes within the definition of "domestic violence" any other crime against a person, or against property, including an animal, or any municipal ordinance violation against a person, or against property, including an animal, when used as a method of coercion, control, punishment, intimidation, or revenge directed against a person with whom the actor is or has been involved in an intimate relationship.

CO - Exotic - Article 81. Hybrid Animals C. R. S. A. § 35-81-101 to 102

This Colorado statute authorized the commissioner of the department of agriculture to appoint and convene an advisory group to study the behavior of hybrid canids (wolf hybrids) and felines, including a review of any incidents involving property damage and personal injury caused by such animals. The department was to present its findings and proposals for legislation in January of 1998.

CO - Impound - Article 4. Disease Control C. R. S. A. § 25-4-610 This Colorado statute provides that it is unlawful for any owner of any dog, cat, other pet animal, or other mammal which has not been inoculated as required by the order of the county board of health or board of health of a health department to allow it to run at large. The health department or health officer may capture and impound any such dog, cat, other pet animal.
CO - Impound - Colorado Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act C. R. S. A. § 35-80-106.3

This is an example of a state statute that creates minimum holding periods that shelters must hold found pets for before allowing the pets to be adopted or otherwise disposed of.

CO - Liability for accident or subsequent disease from impoundment- Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power. C. R. S. A. § 30-15-104

This Colorado statute immunizes the board of county commissioners or other local governing entity from liability associated with the impoundment of pet animals.  Specifically, it states the board or anyone authorized to enforce a local ordinance shall not be held responsible for any accident or subsequent disease that may occur to the animal in connection with the administration of the resolution or ordinance.

CO - Ordinances - Animal control officers--Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power.

This Colorado statute provides that personnel engaged in animal control may issue citations or summonses and complaints enforcing the county dog control resolution or any other county resolution concerning the control of pet animals or municipal ordinance.  Officers assigned to this capacity may be referred to as "peace officers."

CO - Ordinances - Pet animal control and licensing C. R. S. A. § 30-15-101

This Colorado statute states that the board of county commissioners of any county may adopt a resolution for the control and licensing of dogs.  These regulations may require licensing of dogs by owners, require that dogs and other pet animals be under control at all times and define "control," define "vicious dog" and "vicious animal," establish a dog pound, or other animal holding facility, provide for the impoundment of animals which are vicious, not under control, or otherwise not in conformity with the resolutions, and establish such other reasonable regulations and restrictions for the control of dogs and other pet animals.

CO - Pet Shop - Article 80. Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act CO ST § 35-80-101 to 117

This Colorado Act regulates pet animal facilities (i.e., shelters, large kennels, and breeders).  The Act covers licensing of the facilities and those activities deemed unlawful, such as selling a kitten or puppy under the age of 8 weeks and refusing a lawful inspection.

CO - Police Training - Dog Protection Act C.R.S.A. § 29-5-112

This Colorado statute requires local law enforcement to undergo training in order to prevent the shooting of dogs by local law enforcement officers in the line of duty. Specifically, this statute aims to assist in training officers to differentiate between threatening and non-threatening dog behaviors, as well as to employ non-lethal means whenever possible.

Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 329: Section 6268 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6268 (1918)

Section 6268 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the unlawful injury to certain property of another.  Specifically, the statute states the punishment for hurting, maiming, poisoning anther's cattle, ox, horse, and mule.

CT - Assistance Animals - Connecticut Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws C. G. S. A. § 46a-42; § 46a-44; § 46a-64; § 53-330a; § 22-345; § 22-364b

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

CT - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws CT ST § 22-327 - § 22-367a; CT ST § 26-107

These Connecticut statutes comprise the state's dog law.  Among the provisions include licensing, kennel, and rabies regulations.  With regard to damage by dogs, the law provides a form of strict liability that states if any dog does any damage to either the body or property of any person, the owner or keeper shall be liable for such damage, except when such damage has been occasioned to the body or property of a person who, at the time such damage was sustained, was committing a trespass or other tort, or was teasing, tormenting or abusing such dog.  The law also contains a unique "dogs on highway" provision that provides that any person owning or having the custody of any dog which habitually goes out on any highway and growls, bites, or snaps at, or otherwise annoys, any person or domestic animal lawfully using such highway or chases or interferes with any motor vehicle so using such highway, shall be guilty of a class D misdemeanor.  Further, among the nuisance provisions, the law states that no person shall own or harbor a dog which is a nuisance by reason of vicious disposition or excessive barking or other disturbance. These laws also contain provisions on reporting neglected or cruelly treated animals.  Finally, Connecticut has an anti-ear cropping measures that prohibits cropping by anyone who is not a registered veterinary surgeon, and who performs the operation when the dog is under an anesthetic.

CT - Leash - Control of dogs in proximity to guide dogs. C. G. S. A. § 22-364b

This Connecticut law provides that the owner or keeper of a dog shall restrain and control such dog on a leash when such dog is not on the property of its owner or keeper and is in proximity to a blind, deaf or mobility impaired person accompanied by his or her guide dog.  Any person who violates the provisions of this section shall have committed an infraction. If an owner or keeper of a dog violates the provisions of this section and, as a result of such violation, such dog attacks and injures the guide dog, such owner or keeper shall be liable for any damage done to such guide dog, including veterinary care, replacement of the dog, and attorney fees.

CT - Spay and Neuter - Chapter 436A. Animal Population Control C. G. S. A. § 22-380a to 380m

This set of Connecticut laws provides the state's dog and cat sterilization laws. Under the section, no pound is allowed to sell or give away any unspayed or unneutered dog or cat to any person unless such pound receives $45 from the person buying or adopting such dog or cat. These funds are paid quarterly by the municipality into the animal population control account established under section 22-380g. At the time of receipt of such payment, the pound shall provide a voucher, for the purpose of sterilization and vaccination benefits to the person buying or adopting such dog or cat. The chapter also provides the procedure for a veterinarian to participate in the program and the method by which he or she would be paid. Further, the law states that a town clerk may collect an additional $6 for each license issued pursuant to section 22-338 for an unspayed or unneutered dog.

CT - Transportation of dogs in pick-up trucks - Chapter 248. Vehicle Highway Use C. G. S. A. § 14-272b

This Connecticut law prohibits any person from transporting a dog in the open bed of a pick-up truck unless the dog is secured in a cage or other container to prevent it from jumping out of the truck.

DC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws and Dangerous Dog Provision DC CODE § 8-1801 - 1813; § 8-1821.01- .02; § 8-1831.01; 8-1841.01 - .09; 8-1901 - 1908

These District of Columbia statutes make up the dog laws for the District.  Included among the provisions are definitions, animal control and at large provisions, and vaccinations/licensing regulations.  With regard to dangerous dogs, the term "dangerous animal" means an animal that because of specific training or demonstrated behavior threatens the health or safety of the public.  The Mayor may impound any animal at large or any dangerous animal.  If a dog injures a person while at large, lack of knowledge of the dog's vicious propensity standing alone shall not absolve the owner from a finding of negligence.

DC - Dogs - At Large DC ST § 22-1311 The following District of Columbia statute prohibits dogs that the owner knows to be fierce or dangerous, to the danger or annoyance of the inhabitants, from running at large; it also prohibits female dogs in heat to run at large.
DC - Municipalities - Power to Regulate DC ST § 1-303.41 The following District of Columbia statute allows the council to make and the mayor to enforce regulations regarding leashing dogs in DC.
DE - Assistance Animal - Delaware's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws 9 Del.C. § 902, 916; 16 Del.C. § 9501 - 9506; 21 Del.C. § 4144; 6 Del.C. § 4501 - 456; 31 Del.C. § 2117

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

DE - Dangerous - Delaware Dangerous Dog Laws 9 Del.C. § 920 - 928

These Delaware statutes comprise the state's dangerous dog laws.  Among the provisions includes the mandatory seizure of dogs who have chased or pursued persons on bicycles twice in a twelve-month period or those that have killed or inflicted serious injury on people or other domestic animals.  However, no dog shall be considered dangerous or potentially dangerous if a person was, at the time the injury was sustained, committing criminal trespass or other tort upon premises occupied by the owner of the dog, or was teasing, tormenting, abusing or assaulting the dog, or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.  An owner who violates the provisions regarding ownership of dangerous dogs faces graduated fines based on the conduct at issue.

DE - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws DE ST TI 9 § 901 - 919; DE ST TI 9 § 920 - 928; DE ST TI 3 § 8201 - 8213; DE ST TI 3 § 8214 - 8225; DE ST TI 6 § 4001 - 4011; DE ST TI 7 § 1701 - 1740;

These statutes comprise Delaware's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning hunting field trials, and the dangerous dog subchapter.

DE - Fur - Chapter 5. Specific Offenses 11 Del.C. § 1325A

In Delaware, a person is guilty of the unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 2nd degree if the person knowingly or recklessly sells, barters or offers for sale or barter, the fur or hair of a domestic dog or cat or any product made in whole or in part from the fur or hair of a domestic dog or cat. The unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 2nd degree is a class B misdemeanor. A person is guilty of the unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 1st degree if the person knowingly or recklessly sells, barters or offers for sale or barter, the flesh of a domestic dog or cat or any product made in whole or in part from the flesh of a domestic dog or cat. The unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the first degree is a class A misdemeanor.

DE - Ordinances - Local ordinances (dogs) 7 Del.C. § 1740

(Repealed). This Delaware statutes provides that nothing shall prevent a local municipality from enacting measures or a program for the control of dangerous or potentially dangerous dogs.   

DE - Pet Sales - CHAPTER 40. PET WARRANTIES DE ST TI 6 § 4001 - 4011

This Delaware statutory section comprises the state's "pet warranty" laws.  Purchasers receive a statement of the dog's breed and any registration information when buying pets from a retail pet store under the law.  Sellers are required to disclose any known disease or illness at the time of sale.  Further, sellers must provide the following written statement when selling a registered pet:  "A pedigree or a registration does not assure proper breeding condition, health, quality or claims to lineage."  Buyers may receive a refund or replacement, or have veterinary expenses reimbursed by a seller where a dog becomes ill or dies within 20 days of purchase (or within two years for a congenital disorder).

DE - Property - § 910. Dogs deemed personal property; theft; penalty. 9 Del.C. § 910

Dogs are considered personal property in Delaware.

DE - Rabies - Subchapter I. Rabies Control in Animal and Human Populations 3 Del.C. § 8201 - 8213

The purpose of this chapter is to control and suppress the spread of rabies among the domestic and wild animal populations of Delaware. Any person owning a dog 6 months of age or older in this State shall have that dog vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a cat 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the cat vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a ferret 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the ferret vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian.

DE - Spay, Neuter and Feral Cat - Subchapter II. Animal Population Control Program and Spay/Neuter Fund 16 Del.C. §§ 3010F to 3021F by 79 Laws 2014, ch. 377, § 2, eff. July 31, 2014 (formerly DE ST TI 3 § 8214 - 8225)

This chapter represents Delaware's Animal Population Control Program. The section beings with findings from a 2002 study of how many dogs and cats were reclaimed, adopted out, or euthanized. It also has a definitional section that includes a definition for "feral cat." The chapter also describes its funding base and what parties are qualified to receive assistance under the Spay/Neuter Fund. Effective on June 29, 2006, it became mandatory for all cats and/or dogs of reproductive age to be spayed or neutered and inoculated for rabies prior to adoption from any private animal rescue groups and animal shelters.