Dogs: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
MI - Dangerous - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Dangerous Animals. M. C. L. A. 287.321 - 323

This Michigan statute defines "dangerous animal," which means a dog or other animal that bites or attacks a person, or a dog that bites or attacks and causes serious injury or death to another dog while the other dog is on the property or under the control of its owner.  However, a dangerous animal does not include any of the following:  an animal that bites or attacks a person who is knowingly trespassing on the property of the animal's owner; an animal that bites or attacks a person who provokes or torments the animal; or an animal that is responding in a manner that an ordinary and reasonable person would conclude was designed to protect a person if that person is engaged in a lawful activity or is the subject of an assault.

MI - Dog Bite - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. MCL 750.66a

This Michigan law, which becomes effective January of 2009, provides that a person 18 years of age or older who is responsible for controlling the actions of a dog or wolf-dog cross and the person knows or has reason to know that the dog or wolf-dog cross has bitten another person shall remain on the scene. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.

MI - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws M.C.L. 287.261 - 395; 324.73101 - 42106

The regulation of dogs and cats in Michigan implicates three major issues: licensing and registration of dogs; the regulation of animal control facilities and pet shops; and the ever-present concern of dog bites.  The primary statutory vehicle that regulates the licensing requirements for dogs is the The Dog Law of 1919. Under the dog law, it is unlawful for any person to own a dog six months or older unless the dog is licensed. MCL § 287.262. It is also unlawful for a person to own a dog six months or older that does not wear a collar and tag at all times, except when engaged in hunting activities accompanied by his or her owner. MCL § 287.262. A female dog that is in heat may not go beyond her owner’s premises unless properly held on a leash under this section.

MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT. M. C. L. A. 287.1004

This Michigan statute provides the requirements for ownership of wolf-dog hybrids in the state.

MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT. MI ST 287.1021

Under this Michigan statute, a local unit is empowered to adopt an ordinance governing wolf-dog crosses that is more restrictive than this act, provided it fulfills the  requirements of this act in addition to any other requirements governing a wolf-dog cross under state and federal law.

MI - Exotic Pets - Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Wolf-dog Cross Act MI ST 287.1001 - 1023

This Michigan law bans acquisition and possession of wolf-dog hybrids, though it “grandfathered” animals already owned as pets at the time of the law's enactments. In order to maintain public safety and animal welfare, the state created a strict permit system for those owners who were allowed to keep their already-existing pets. (See also link to Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Large Carnivore Act ; link to 287.731- Importation of species having potential to endanger life or property prohibited; importation of wild or exotic animals; requirements and prohibitions ).

MI - Impound - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Use of Dogs and Cats for Research. MCL 287.388

This Michigan statute provides that a dealer, a county, city, village, or township operating a dog pound or animal shelter shall not sell or otherwise dispose of a dog or cat within 4 days after its acquisition. If the dog or cat has a collar, license, or other evidence of ownership, the operator of the pound or shelter shall notify the owner in writing and disposition of the animal shall not be made within 7 days from the date of mailing the notice.

MI - Leash - 287.262. Licensing and control of dogs; hunting dogs; female dogs in heat; straying dogs M. C. L. A. 287.262

This section of the Dog Law of 1919 provides that any dog over six months must be registered and wear a collar at all times.  It also mandates that female dogs in heat must be kept on their owners' premises or restrained on a leash.  The overall leash requirement is less clear, stating that it is unlawful for an owner to allow a dog " to stray unless held properly in leash."  This does appear to mandate a statewide leash requirement for dogs, however.

MI - Lost Property - Chapter 434. Lost and Unclaimed Property. Lost Property. M. C. L. A. 434.21 - 29

This section comprises Michigan's Lost Property statutes.

MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.289a

This Michigan law provides that a board of county commissioners may establish, by ordinance, an animal control agency.  The animal control agency shall have jurisdiction to enforce this act in any city, village or township which does not have an animal control ordinance. The county's animal control ordinance shall provide for animal control programs, facilities, personnel and necessary expenses incurred in animal control. 

MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.290

This Michigan statute enables a city, village or township to adopt an animal control ordinance to regulate the licensing, payment of claims and providing for the enforcement thereof.

MI - Ordinances - Chapters 81 to 113 Fourth Class Cities. M. C. L. A. 91.1

This Michigan statute provides that a city incorporated under the provisions of this act has, and the council may pass ordinances relating to, the following general powers:  To provide for the issuing of licenses to the owners and keepers of dogs and to require the owners and keepers of dogs to pay for and obtain such licenses; and to regulate and prevent the running at large of dogs, to require dogs to be muzzled, and to authorize the killing of dogs running at large or not licensed in violation of an ordinance of the city.

MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50a

This statute sets out the penalty for willful and malicious interference with guide dogs used by individuals defined by statute as blind, deaf, or physically limited.  Under the statute, a first offense results in a misdemeanor conviction with penalty enhancement for subsequent convictions.

MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50c

This statute outlines the penalty for the intentional physical harm or interference with a police dog or horse.  The statute provides for a misdemeanor in the case of interference to the animal and a five-year felony where the animal was killed or seriously physically injured.  If the interference was committed during the commission of another felony, then the penalty rises to a potential two-year imprisonment.

MN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animals/Guide Dog Laws MN ST § 169.202; 343.20; 343.21; 363A.09; 363A.19; 256C.001 - 256C.06 ; 609.226

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

MN - Dangerous - Minnesota Dangerous Dog Definitions, Dog Bites, & Rabies Treatments MN ST § 35.67 - 35.69; MN ST § 346.51; MN ST § 347.50

This Minnesota statute outlines the procedure for a town establishing a rabies proclamation and prevents the running at large of unmuzzled dogs in such localities.  It also provides that an owner or custodian of a dog which does not have an appropriate antirabies vaccination and which bites or otherwise exposes a person to rabies virus may be penalized under section 346.53.  The statute also defines "dangerous dog" and "potentially dangerous dog." 

MN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws MN ST 35.67 - 71; 97A.321, 97B.001 - 621; 325F.79-792; 346.01-58; 347.01-56; 365.10; 366.01

These statutes comprise Minnesota's relevant dog laws.  Among the provisions include several laws related to natural resources protection and hunting with dogs, the sale of dogs, and laws related to damage done by dogs.

MN - Dogs - 347.14. Unlicensed dogs MN ST § 347.14

This Minnesota statute, amended in 2006, provides that any person may seize, impound, or restrain any unlicensed dog which the person may find running at large. The fact that a dog is without a license attached to a collar shall be presumptive evidence that the dog is unlicensed.  An officer is under a duty to seize and impound such animal.

MN - Ordinances - 366.01.Chapter 366. Town Board; Board of Audit. Town Board. MN ST § 366.01

This Minnesota statute provides that the supervisors of each town constituting a town board are empowered to license and regulate the presence or keeping of dogs or domestic animal pets when deemed to be in the public interest.

MN - Ordinances - Chapter 347. Dogs and Cats. Dogs. MN ST § 347.21

This Minnesota statute provides that state dog control laws are supplemental to local provisions enacted by ordinance and shall not be construed as to modify, repeal, or prevent municipalities from prohibiting, licensing, or regulating the running at large of dogs.

MN - Ordinances - Chapter 365. Town General Law. Town Meeting Powers. MN ST § 365.10

Under this Minnesota statute, town electors at their annual town meeting, are empowered to exercise control over a number of activities relating to dogs.  They can decide the locations of pounds, set the number of poundmasters, and discontinue a pound.  The electors may make orders and bylaws on restraining horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and other domestic animals from going at large on roads. They may also make orders and bylaws on the impounding of domestic animals going at large and fix penalties for violations of the orders and bylaws.  The electors may let the town board pass an ordinance for licensing dogs and cats and regulating their presence, keeping, and running at large in the town.  The electors are also granted the authority t o provide for a specific activity that is within any of the following categories:   the promotion of health, safety, order, and convenience, and the general welfare.  

MN - Rabies - Chapter 35. Animal Health MN ST § 35.67 - 35.69

This set of Minnesota laws relates to rabies investigation and proclamation. The owner or custodian of a dog may not permit it to be at large, either on the premises of the owner or elsewhere, within any city or town covered by a proclamation made under section 35.68, during the time the proclamation is in force, unless the dog is effectively muzzled so that it cannot bite any other animal or person. Sec. 35.69 also allows any person to kill a dog found running at large contrary to a rabies proclamation.

MO - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws MO ST 209.150, 209.152, 209.160, 209.162, 209.190, 209.200, 209.202, 209.204; 304.080

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

MO - Dog Ordinances - Chapter 77. Third Class Cities. MO ST 77.510

This Missouri statute provides that a city council may tax, restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs, and provide for their destruction when at large contrary to ordinance, and impose penalties on the owners or keepers thereof.

MO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws MO ST 273.010 - 405

These Missouri statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws for impounding loose dogs, licensing, rabies control, and the Animal Care Facilities Act, which regulates commercial breeders/pet shops.

MO - Impound - Chapter 273. Dogs--Cats. Local Option Dog Tax. MO ST 273.100

This Missouri statute provides that every city or town marshal of every incorporated city or town shall seize and impound all dogs found running at large without collars around their necks.  These dogs will be kept for a period of one week after which they shall be put to death by humane methods.  The statute further states that any marshal who shall fail or refuse to take up and impound any such dog shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction thereof fined not less than five dollars nor more than twenty-five dollars.

MO - Initiatives - Proposition B (dog breeders) Proposition B (2010) This 2010 ballot measure asked whether Missouri law shall be amended to: require large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with sufficient food, clean water, housing and space; necessary veterinary care; regular exercise and adequate rest between breeding cycles; prohibit any breeder from having more than 50 breeding dogs for the purpose of selling their puppies as pets; and create a misdemeanor crime of puppy mill cruelty” for any violations. It was passed in 2010 by 51.6% of voters.
MO - Ordinances - Chapter 79. Fourth Class Cities. Police and Health Regulations MO ST 79.400

This Missouri statute provides that a local board of aldermen may tax, regulate and restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs, and provide for their destruction when at large contrary to ordinance, and impose penalties on the owners or keepers thereof.

MO - Pet Shop - Animal Care and Facilities Licensing and Regulation (Chapter 273) MO ST 273.325 - 359

Under these Missouri statutes, a license is required to operate animal boarding facilities, pet shops, pounds, dealers and commercial breeders. The canine cruelty prevention act makes it the crime of canine cruelty if the person poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of animals in the person's custody. A violation is a misdemeanor.

MO - Rabies - Chapter 322. Protection Against Rabies MO ST 322.090 - 322.145

This chapter concerns laws preventing the transmission and control of rabies and other zoonotic diseases. Section 322.140 provides that if a county does not adopt rules and regulations pursuant to sections 322.090 to 322.130, whenever an animal bites or otherwise possibly transmits rabies or any zoonotic disease, the incident shall be immediately reported to the county health department. It also provides that the owner of an owner that bites is responsible for the costs associated with rabies testing and/or treatment. Further, the owner of an animal that bites or otherwise possibly transmitted rabies or any zoonotic disease shall be liable to an injured party for all damages done by the animal.

MO - Wildlife - Chapter 252. Department of Conservation--Fish and Game. MO ST 252.040 No wildlife shall be pursued, taken, killed, possessed or disposed of except in the manner, to the extent and at the time or times permitted by such rules and regulations; and any pursuit, taking, killing, possession or disposition thereof, except as permitted by such rules and regulations, are hereby prohibited. Any person violating this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor except that any person violating any of the rules and regulations pertaining to record keeping requirements imposed on licensed fur buyers and fur dealers shall be guilty of an infraction and shall be fined not less than ten dollars nor more than one hundred dollars.   At least one case has held this statute to be applicable to dogs chasing deer.
MS - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws MS ST § 43-6-151 to 43-6-155; § 97-41-21; § 63-3-1111

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

MS - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws MS ST § 19-5-50; § 19-25-83; § 19-5-3; § 21-19-9; § 21-21-5; § 41-53-1 - 13; § 49-7-42; § 69-29-2; § 73-39-89; § 95-5-19 - 21

These Mississippi statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions relating to hunting with dogs, local dog ordinances, and liability of owners for damage done by dogs.

MS - Dog Licenses - Chapter 53. Dogs and Rabies Control. MS ST 41-53-11

This Mississippi statute provides that it is the lawful duty for any sheriff, conservation officer or peace officer of a county or municipality to kill any dog above the age of three (3) months found running at large on whose neck there is no such collar and tag or who are not inoculated according to state law. No action shall be maintained by the owner for such killing.  However, the statute then goes on to say that it is the duty of such officer to first impound the dogs for five days and give a description of the dog to the sheriff.

MS - Leash, Impound - Chapter 19. Health, Safety, and Welfare MS ST § 21-19-9

This Mississippi law grants broad powers to local units of government for animal control, including the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs and penalties provided for the violation of such regulations and the expense of impounding and keeping and selling the same; to regulate and provide for the taxing of owners and harborers of dogs, and to destroy dogs running at large, unless such dogs have proper identification.

MS - Licenses - Chapter 5. Health, Safety and Public Welfare. In General MS ST § 19-5-50

This Mississippi statute provides that the governing authorities of any county bordering on the Gulf of Mexico and having within its boundaries two cities having in excess of forty thousand (40,000) population each and any county with a population in excess of two hundred thousand (200,000) shall have the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs.  These governing bodies are also given the authority to regulate and tax dogs generally.

MT - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws MT ST 49-4-202 to 49-4-217; 61-8-516

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

MT - Bite - Chapter 1. Availability of Remedies--Liability. MT ST 27-1-715

This Montana statute provides that the owner of any dog which shall without provocation bite any person while such person is on or in a public place or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of such dog, located within an incorporated city or town shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.

MT - Dangerous - CHAPTER 23. DOMESTIC ANIMAL CONTROL AND PROTECTION. MT ST 7-23-2109

This Montana statute provides that the county governing body may regulate, restrain, control, kill, or quarantine any vicious dog, whether such dog is licensed or unlicensed, by the adoption of an ordinance which substantially complies with state dangerous dog laws.

MT - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws MT ST 7-23-101 to 7-23-105; 7-23-2108 to 7-23-4104; 7-23-4201 to 7-23-4203; 27-1-715; 81-7-401 to 81-7-403

These Montana statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include strict liability for all dog bites, authority for counties to enact ordinances regarding dangerous dogs, barking dogs, and destruction of unlicensed dogs, as well as general laws related to registration and licensing.

MT - Licenses - Chapter 23. Domestic Animal Control and Protection. MT ST 7-23-4103 This Montana statute relates to annual dog licenses issued by municipal corporations pursuant to an ordinance which substantially complies with state law.
MT - Lost Property - RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF FINDERS GENERALLY MT ST 70-5-101 to 70-5-107

This section comprises Montana's lost property provisions.

MT - Ordinance - Chapter 23. Domestic Animal Control and Protection. MT ST 7-23-2108

This Montana statute provides that the governing body of the county may regulate, restrain, or prohibit the running at large of dogs by the adoption of an ordinance which substantially complies with state law provisions related to licensing.  Violation of an ordinance adopted is a misdemeanor.  Additionally, t he county governing body is authorized to impound, sell, kill, or otherwise destroy dogs found at large contrary to ordinances.

NC - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws NC ST § 14-163.1; § 168-1 - 13; § 20-175.1 - 175.4

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NC - Bite - Chapter 67. Dogs. Article 1A. Dangerous Dogs. NC ST § 67-1 to 18; NC ST § 130A-196, 130A-200

These North Carolina statutes comprise the state's dangerous dog and dog bite laws.  Among the provisions include misdemeanor penalties for an owner if a dangerous dog attacks a person and causes physical injuries requiring medical treatment in excess of one hundred dollars ($100.00) and strict liability in civil damages for any injuries or property damage the dog inflicts upon a person, his property, or another animal.  Another statute provides that any person brought to receive medical treatment for a dog bite must report it to the local health director and the animal must be confined for a ten day observation period.

NC - Dangerous Dogs - Chapter 67. Dogs NC ST § 67-14.1

This North Carolina statute provides that any dog which trails, runs, injures or kills any deer or bear on any wildlife refuge, sanctuary or management area designated by the Wildlife Resources Commission, during the closed season for hunting with dogs on such refuge or management area, is hereby declared to be a public nuisance, and any wildlife protector may destroy it by humane method.  Any unmuzzled dog running at large in such area shall be impounded and notice shall be published in some newspaper published in the county for two successive weeks.  If no owner comes to claim the dog, it may be destroyed within 15 days after publication.

NC - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws NC ST § 14-81 to 82; § 19A-20 to 44; § 19A-60 to 65; § 67-1 - 36; § 90-187.7; § 113-291.5; § 130A-184 to 204; § 145-13; § 160A-186; § 160A-212

These North Carolina statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include pet shop provisions, rabies vaccination laws, and the dangerous dog chapter.

NC - Impound - Chapter 90. Medicine and Allied Occupations. NC ST § 90-187.7

This North Carolina statute provides that any animal placed in the custody of a licensed veterinarian for treatment, boarding or other care, unclaimed by its owner for a period of more than 10 days after written notice by registered or certified mail, shall be deemed to be abandoned and may be turned over to the nearest humane society, or dog pound or disposed of as such custodian may deem proper.  The giving of proper notice relieves such custodian of liability resulting from the disposal.

NC - Licenses - Chapter 130A. Public Health. NC ST § 130A-192

This North Carolina statute provides that the Animal Control Officer shall canvass the county to determine if there are any dogs or cats not wearing the required rabies vaccination tag.  If the animal is wearing an owner identification tag, or if the Animal Control Officer otherwise knows who the owner is, the Animal Control Officer shall notify the owner in writing to have the animal vaccinated against rabies and to produce the required rabies vaccination certificate within three days.  If the animal is not wearing an owner identification tag and the Animal Control Officer does not otherwise know who the owner is, the Animal Control Officer may impound the animal.  The duration of the impoundment of these animals shall be established by the county board of commissioners, but the duration shall not be less than 72 hours.  During the impoundment period, the Animal Control Officer shall make a reasonable effort to locate the owner of the animal.

NC - Licenses - Chapter 160A. Cities and Towns. NC ST § 160A-212

This North Carolina statute provides that a city shall have power to levy an annual license tax on the privilege of keeping any domestic animal, including dogs and cats, within the city.  However, this section shall not limit the city's authority to enact related ordinances.

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