Dogs: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
NC - Trusts - Chapter 36C. North Carolina Uniform Trust Code. NC ST § 36C-4-408

This North Carolina provides that a trust for the care of one or more designated domestic or pet animals alive at the time of creation of the trust is valid.  Further, no portion of the principal or income may be converted to the use of the trustee or to any use other than for the benefit of the designated animal or animals.  The trust terminates upon the death of the animal named or the last surviving animal named in the trust.

ND - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws ND ST 25-13-01 to 06

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

ND - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws ND ST 11-11-14; 20.1-04-12 - 12.2; 20.1-05-02.1; 23-36-01 - 09; 36-21-10 - 11; 40-05-01 -2; 40-05-19; 42-03-01 - 04; 43-29-16.1

These statutes comprise North Dakota's dog laws.  Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, rabies, control laws, provisions that define dogs as a public nuisance, and laws concerning dogs that harass big game or livestock.

ND - Lost Property - CHAPTER 60-01. DEPOSITS - GENERAL PROVISIONS. ND ST 60-01-34 to 43

These statutes comprise North Dakota's lost property provisions.

ND - Ordinances - Chapter 40-05. Powers of Municipalities. ND ST 40-05-02

This North Dakota statute provides that the city council in a city operating under the council form of government and the board of city commissioners in a city operating under the commission system of government, in addition to the powers possessed by all municipalities, shall have power to license dogs and to regulate the keeping of dogs including authorization for their disposition or destruction in order to protect the health, safety, and general welfare of the public.

ND - Rabies - Chapter 23-36. Rabies Control. ND ST 23-36-03

This North Dakota statute provides that the appropriate health department may promptly seize and humanely kill, impound at the owner's expense, or quarantine any animal if the state health officer has probable cause to believe the animal presents clinical symptoms of rabies or determines the animal is a threat to human life or safety due to the possible exposure of an individual to rabies.

NE - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Neb. Rev. St. § 49-801; Neb. Rev. St. § 20-126 - 131.04; Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1313 - 1314; Neb. Rev. St. § 54-603; Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1009.01

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NE - Dangerous - ARTICLE 6. DOGS AND CATS. (B) DANGEROUS DOGS. NE ST § 54-617 to 54-624

These Nebraska statutes outline the state's dangerous dog laws.  Among the provisions include a requirement that the dog must be restrained when not in a secure enclosure on the owner's property.  There is also a requirement that owners must post warning signs on the property notifying people that a dangerous dog is present.  If a dangerous dog bites a person, the owner can be found guilty of a Class IV misdemeanor and the dog will be destroyed. 

NE - Dangerous Dog - 54-624. CHAPTER 54. LIVESTOCK . NE ST § 54-624

This Nebraska statute provides that nothing in the state dangerous dog laws (sections 54-617 to 54-623) shall be construed to restrict or prohibit any governing board of any county, city, or village from establishing and enforcing laws or ordinances at least as stringent as the provisions of sections 54-617 to 54-623.

NE - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws NE ST § 14-102; § 15-218 - 220; § 16-206; 16-235; § 17-526, 17-547; § 25-21,236; § 37-525; § 37-705; § 54-601 - 616; § 54-617 - 624; § 54-625 - 650; § 71-4401 - 4412

These Nebraska statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include the municipal authority to regulate dogs at large and licensing, rabies control, and dangerous dog laws.  The set of laws relating to commercial pet dealers and breeders is also provided.

NE - Impound - CHAPTER 71. PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE NE ST § 71-4408

This Nebraska statute provides that any dog found outside the owner's premises whose owner does not possess a valid certificate of rabies vaccination and valid rabies vaccination tag for such dog shall be impounded for not less than 72 hours.  If an impounded domestic animal is unclaimed at the end of five days, the authorities may dispose of it in accordance with applicable laws or rules and regulations.

NE - Licenses - Chapter 15. Cities of the Primary Class. NE ST § 15-220 This Nebraska statute provides that a primary city shall have power to regulate, license, or prohibit the running at large of dogs and other animals and guard against injuries or annoyances therefrom, and to authorize the destruction of the same when running at large contrary to the provisions of any ordinance.
NE - Licenses - Chapter 15. Cities of the Primary Class NE ST § 15-218 This Nebraska statue provides that a primary city shall have power, by ordinance, to regulate or prohibit the running at large of cattle, hogs, horses, mules, sheep, goats, dogs, and other animals and to cause these animals to be impounded and sold to discharge the cost of impoundment.
NE - Licenses - Chapter 54. Livestock. Article 6. Dogs and Cats. NE ST § 54-603

This Nebraska statute provides that any county, city, or village shall have authority by ordinance or resolution, to impose a license tax on the owner or harborer of any dog or dogs.

NE - Licenses -Chapter 17. Cities of the Second Class And Villages. NE ST § 17-526 This Nebraska statute provides that second-class cities and villages may, by ordinance, impose a license tax for each dog or other animal and cause the destruction of any dog or other animal when the owner or harborer shall refuse or neglect to pay such license.  Such municipality may regulate, license, or prohibit the running at large of dogs and other animals and guard against injuries or annoyances therefrom and authorize the destruction of the same when running at large contrary to the provisions of any ordinance. 
NH - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws NH ST § 21-P:37-a; 167-D:1 - 10; 265:41-a

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NH - Disaster - Chapter 21-P. Department of Safety. Homeland Security and Emergency Management. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 21-P:37-a

In New Hampshire, state policy mandates that service animals and the people they serve be kept  together in cases of emergency. State emergency planning and training must take that requirement into account.

NH - Dog Bite - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. NH ST § 466:31 to 31-a

Under this section, a dog is considered to be a nuisance, a menace, or vicious to persons or to property if it is "at large," if it barks for sustained periods, if it chases cars continuously, or if it growls, snaps at or bites persons.  If a dog bites a person and breaks the skin, the animal control officer must inform the victim whether the dog was vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours.

NH - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws NH ST § 466:1 - 466:54; 47:17; 207:11 - 207:13b; 210:18; 264:31; 436:99 - 436:109; 437:1 - 2437:2; 437-A:1 - 9; 508:18-a

These New Hampshire statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, dangerous dog laws, and the rabies control code.

NH - Exotic Pets - Chapter 466-A. Wolf Hybrids NH ST § 466-A:1 to 466-A:6

This section of laws comprises New Hampshire's wolf-dog hybrid act. Under the law, no person shall sell or resell, offer for sale or resale, or release or cause to be released a wolf hybrid in the state of New Hampshire. A person may temporarily import a wolf hybrid provided that he or she shows proof of spaying or neutering and has accurate vaccination records. Each wolf hybrid shall be under the physical control of the owner or confined in an enclosure or structure sufficient to prohibit escape. Any person in violation of this chapter or any rule adopted under this chapter shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor. (See also link to 207:14 Import, Possession, or Release of Wildlife ).

NH - Impound - Chapter 436. Diseases of Domestic Animals. Rabies Control. NH ST 436:107

This New Hampshire statute provides that the local rabies control authority shall establish and maintain a pound.  Any dog found off the owner's premises and not wearing a valid vaccination tag shall be impounded and maintained at the pound for a minimum of 7 days unless reclaimed earlier by the owner.  Notice of impoundment of all dogs, including any significant marks of identification, shall be posted at the pound as public notification of impoundment.  If the dog is unclaimed at the end of 7 days, the rabies control authority may dispose of the dog in accordance with applicable laws or rules.

NH - Kennel - CHAPTER 466. DOGS AND CATS. NH ST § 466:6

This New Hampshire statute outlines the provisions of dog group licenses (i.e., kennel licenses).

NH - Licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. NH ST 466:29

This New Hampshire statute provides that, in the case of a rabies epidemic, the mayor and aldermen of a city or the selectmen of a town may order that all dogs within the limits of the city or town shall be muzzled or restrained from running at large during the time prescribed by such order.  Any offending dog may be impounded.

NH - Licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. NH ST § 466:30-a

This New Hampshire law provides that it is unlawful for any dog to run at large.  "At large" is defined as "off the premises of the owner or keeper and not under the control of any person by means of personal presence and attention as will reasonably control the conduct of such dog, unless accompanied by the owner or custodian."  Any authorized person may seize such at large dogs.

NH - Ordinances - 466:30-b Referendum (muzzling and restraining dogs) NH ST § 466:30-b

This New Hampshire statute outlines the required referendum format if a town seeks to adopt an ordinance that prohibits the running at large of dogs.  Towns that do not adopt this statutory format may regulate the running at large of dogs by enacting ordinances that comply with other statutes.

NJ - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws NJ ST 2A:42-109; 10:5-5; 10:5-29.1 - 10; 39:4-37.1; 48:3-33; App. A:9-43.2; 2C:29-3.1; 48:3-33; 18A:46-13.3

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NJ - Dog Bite - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJ ST 4:19-16

This New Jersey statute provides that the owner of any dog that bites a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.

NJ - Dog - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJ ST 4:19-15.1 to 4:19-15.33

These New Jersey statutes comprise the laws for licensing, impounding, appointment of animal control officers, and kennel/pet shop regulations.  It also includes a provision that prohibits impounded animals from being sold or donated for experimentation, as well as pet sterilization provisions..

NJ - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws NJ ST 2A:42-101 to 2A:42-113; 2C:29-3.1; 4:19-1 to 4:19-43; 4:19A-1 - 17; 4:21B-1 - 3; 4:22A-1 to 13; 23:4-25, 26, 46; 26:4-78 - 95; 40:48-1

These statutes comprise New Jersey's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws regarding domesticated animals in housing projects, rabies control laws, licensing requirements, and dangerous dog laws.

NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJ ST 4:19-26

This New Jersey statute provides that, if a dog is declared vicious or potentially dangerous, the owner of the dog shall be liable to the municipality in which the dog is impounded for the costs and expenses of impounding and destroying the dog. The municipality may establish by ordinance a schedule of these costs and expenses.

NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJ ST 4:19-9

This New Jersey statute provides that a person may humanely destroy a dog in self defense, or which is found chasing, worrying, wounding or destroying any sheep, lamb, poultry or domestic animal.

NJ - License - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJ ST 4:19-31

This New Jersey statute provides that every municipality may, by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for a potentially dangerous dog license and each renewal thereof, which sum shall not be less than $150 nor more than $700. In the absence of any local ordinance, the fee for all potentially dangerous dog licenses shall be $150.

NJ - Licenses - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJ ST 4:19-15.11

This New Jersey statute provides that dog license fees collected under this chapter shall be used by municipalities for the following purposes only; for collecting, keeping and disposing of dogs liable to seizure under this act or under local dog control ordinances; for local prevention and control of rabies; for providing antirabic treatment under the direction of the local board of health for any person known or suspected to have been exposed to rabies, for payment of damage to or losses of poultry and domestic animals, except dogs and cats, caused by a dog or dogs and for administering the provisions of this act.

NJ - Licenses - 4Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJ ST 4:19-1

This New Jersey statute provides the regulations for dog taxes except in taxing districts where the running at large of dogs is regulated by ordinance.

NJ - Ordinance - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJ ST 4:19-15.12

This New Jersey statute provides that a municipality may by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for a dog license and each renewal thereof, which sum shall be not less than $1.50 nor more than $21.00.  The statute also also provides upper and lower limits for three-year licenses.

NJ - Ordinances - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJ ST 4:19-36

This New Jersey statute provides that the provisions of the dangerous dog act shall supersede any law, ordinance, or regulation concerning vicious or potentially dangerous dogs, any specific breed of dog, or any other type of dog inconsistent with this act enacted by any municipality, county, or county or local board of health.

NJ - Pet Sales - Pet Purchase Protection Act NJ ST 56:8-92 to 56:8-97

This New Jersey Act protects pet purchasers who receive "defective" companion animals.  A purchaser of a defective pet must have his or her pet examined by a veterinarian within 14 days of purchase to receive a refund or exchange.  Alternatively, a buyer may retain the pet and be reimbursed for veterinary bills up to two times the cost of the dog or cat.

NM - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws NMSA 1978, § 28-7-3 to 28-7-5; § 28-11-1 to 28-11-6; § 77-1-15.1

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NM - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-10

This New Mexico statute provides that it is unlawful for any person to keep any animal known to be vicious and liable to attack or injure human beings unless such animal is securely kept to prevent injury to any person.  It is also unlawful to keep any unvaccinated dog or cat or any animal with any symptom of rabies or to fail or to refuse to destroy vicious animals or unvaccinated dogs or cats with symptoms of rabies.

NM - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws NMSA 1978, § 3-18-3; NMSA 1978, § 77-1-1 - 20

These statutes comprise New Mexico's dog laws.  Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, vaccination requirements, and provisions related to dangerous dogs.

NM - Dog Bite - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-6

This short New Mexico statute provides that state health department shall prescribe regulations for the reporting of animal bites, confinement and disposition of rabies-suspect animals, rabies quarantine and the disposition of dogs and cats exposed to rabies, in the interest of public health and safety.

NM - Impound - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-17

This New Mexico statute provides that the owner or operator of a veterinary clinic or hospital, a doctor of veterinary medicine, a kennel, grooming parlor or other animal care facility is not liable for disposing of abandoned animals after proper notice has been sent to the owner of record.

NM - Licenses - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-15.1

This New Mexico statute provides that every municipality and each county may provide by ordinance for the mandatory licensure of dogs over the age of three months. License fees shall be fixed by the responsible municipality or county.  Further, pursuant to this statute, every municipality and each county shall provide for the impoundment of rabies-suspect animals.

NM - Ordinances - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-12

This New Mexico statute provides that each municipality and each county shall make provision by ordinance for the seizure and disposition of dogs and cats running at large and not kept or claimed by any person on their premises provided that it does not conflict with state law.

NM - Property - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-1

Dogs, cats and domestic birds are considered personal property in New Mexico.

NV - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N. R. S. 118.105; 426.097; 426.099; 426.510; 426.515; 426.790; 426.805; 426.800; 426.810; 426.820; 484B.290; 613.330; 651.075; 704.145; and 706.366

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NV - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 202. Crimes Against Public Health and Safety. N. R. S. 202.500

This Nevada statute defines a "dangerous dog," as a dog, that without provocation, on two separate occasions within 18 months, behaved menacingly to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend him or herself against substantial bodily harm, when the dog is either off the premises of its owner or keeper or not confined in a cage or pen.  A dog then becomes "vicious" when, without being provoked, it killed or inflicted substantial bodily harm upon a human being.  If substantial bodily harm results from an attack by a dog known to be vicious, its owner or keeper is guilty of a category D felony.  Under the statute, a dog may not be declared dangerous if it attacks as a defensive act against a person who was committing or attempting to commit a crime or who provoked the dog.

NV - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws N. R. S. 193.021; N. R. S. 202.500; N. R. S. 206.150; N. R. S. 244.359; N. R. S. 269.225; N. R. S. 503.631; N. R. S. 568.370; N.R.S. 574.600 - 670; N.R.S. 575.020

These statutes comprise Nevada's dog laws.  Among the provisions include a link to proper care requirements for companion animals, animal control ordinance provisions, and the dangerous dog law among others.

NV - Dog Ordinance - 244.359. Ordinance concerning control of animals, license fee and designation of and requirement of liabili N. R. S. 244.359

This Nevada statute provides that each board of county commissioners may enact and enforce an ordinance related to dogs including licensing, regulating or prohibiting the running at large and disposal of all kinds of animals, establishing a pound, designating an animal as inherently dangerous and requiring the owner of such an animal to obtain a policy of liability insurance, among other things.

NV - Pet Sales - Title 50. Animals. Chapter 574. Cruelty to Animals: Prevention and Penalties N. R. S. 574.450 to 574.510

This Nevada statutory section comprises the state's pet sale laws.  The law protects purchasers of pets by ensuring minimum standards of care at retail pet stores and allows purchasers to return "defective" pets within ten days of purchase.

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