Dogs: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
OH - Impound - Impounding Animals R.C. § 715.23

This Ohio statute empowers municipal corporations to regulate, restrain, or prohibit the running at large of cattle, horses, swine, sheep, goats, geese, chickens, or other fowl or animals (except as otherwise provided for dogs), impound and hold these animals, and authorize the sale of the animals for the penalty imposed.

OH - Ordinance - 955.221 County, township, and municipal corporation ordinances to control dogs R.C. § 955.221

This Ohio statute provides that a board of county commissioners, board of township trustees, or municipal corporation may adopt and enforce resolutions to control dogs that are not otherwise in conflict with any other provision of the Revised Code.  These ordinances or resolutions to control dogs include, but are not limited to, ordinances or resolutions concerned with the ownership, keeping, or harboring of dogs, the restraint of dogs, dogs as public nuisances, and dogs as a threat to public health, safety, and welfare, except that such ordinances or resolutions shall not prohibit the use of any dog which is lawfully engaged in hunting or training for the purpose of hunting while accompanied by a licensed hunter.

OK - Dangerous dog - § 44. Definitions 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 44

This Oklahoma statute provides the definitions related to dangerous dog laws in the state, including dangerous dog, potentially dangerous dog, severe injury, and owner, among others.

OK - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws 21 Okl. St. Ann. § 1717 - 1718; 4 Okl.St.Ann. § 41 - 47; 391 - 402; 499 - 499.10; 501 - 602; OK ST T. 29 § 7-304

These statutes comprise Oklahoma's dog laws.  Among the provisions include dog control laws, sterilization provisions for adopted animals, and the use of unclaimed animals in scientific research or experimentation.

OK - Dog bite - Oklahoma Dog Bite Laws 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 41 - 47

These statutes comprise Oklahoma's Dangerous Dog Laws.  The state imposes strict liability for dog bites; "the owner or owners of any dog shall be liable for damages to the full amount of any damages sustained when his dog, without provocation, bites or injures any person while such person is in or on a place where he has a lawful right to be."  Further, any person may lawfully kill a dog who is chasing that person's livestock.  An owner of a dog that has been adjudged "dangerous" must register the dog, enclose the dog except when out on a leash with muzzle, and post $50,000 in liability insurance.  An owner who does not follow the provisions not only faces the confiscation of his or her dog, but may also be subject to a one-year misdemeanor.

OK - Impound - § 394. Delivery of animals on demand--Municipal ordinances relating to impoundment and scientific research 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 394

This Oklahoma statute provides that, except as otherwise provided by municipal ordinance, it shall be the duty of the pound supervisor to deliver available impounded animals to licensed research facilities unless excepted by statute.  Only dogs that have been impounded for a minimum of  15 days for a unlicensed dogs and 30 days days for licensed dogs and those dogs that were not voluntarily impounded by their owners on condition that they not be used for scientific research may be given to institutions.

OK - Leash - § 2217. Public access and use of state parks--Prohibitions (dog leash) 74 Okl.St.Ann. § 2217 (formerly OK ST T. 74 § 1846.1 (Repealed); 74 Okl. St. Ann. § 2217)

This Oklahoma leash law provides that no person shall enter a state park with a dog, except those on leash, or permit any dog owned by him to enter a state park, recreational ground or state monument without a leash.  A dog in one of these areas that is found running loose or chasing game can be killed by any authorized member of the Department or any authorized employee of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, neither of whom is not liable for the killing.

OK - Licenses - § 22-115. Animals running at large--Regulation and taxation 11 Okl. St. Ann. § 22-115 to 115.1

This Oklahoma statute provides that the municipal governing body may regulate or prohibit animals from running at large.  The governing body may also regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and authorize the killing of dogs which are found at large in violation of any ordinance regulating the same.

OK - Ordinances - § 43. Counties over 200,000 population--Regulation and control of dogs running at large--Penalties 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 43 This Oklahoma statute provides that the board of county commissioners of any county with a population of two hundred thousand (200,000) or more may regulate or prohibit the running at large of dogs and may impound and dispose of such dogs.  The board of county commissioners may also regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and authorize the humane killing or disposal of dogs, found at large, contrary to any ordinance regulating the same. Any person, firm or corporation who violates any rule or regulation made by such board of county commissioners under the authority of this act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished as provided by the laws of this state.
OK - Property - § 1717. Dog as personal property OK ST T. 21 § 1717

Dogs are considered personal property in Oklahoma.

OK - Research - Chapter 13. Use of Unclaimed Animals for Scientific Investigation and Education. 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 391 - 402

These Oklahoma statutes provide the rules for scientific or medical research facilities that use animals obtained from animal shelters or dog pounds.  Among the provisions are licensing procedures, inspection requirements, municipal ordinance requirements relating to duration that animals must first be impounded, and a provision specifying that anyone who fails to undertake the duties required by the act is subject to a misdemeanor.  Notably, a municipality must provide that an owner of an animal who voluntarily delivers it to a public pound has the right to specify that it not be used for scientific research; it shall be the duty of the pound superintendent to tag such animal properly and to make certain that such animal is not delivered to an institution for scientific purposes.  However, institution is immune from liability resulting from an improper delivery to such an institution.

OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.155. Impoundment of dogs for harming or chasing livestock; tests to determine fact; costs O. R. S. § 609.155

This Oregon statute provides that, in a county with a dog control program, upon finding a dog engaged in killing, wounding, injuring or chasing livestock or upon receipt from a complainant of evidence that a dog has been so engaged, the dog control officer or other law enforcement officer shall impound the dog.  Tests may then be conducted to determine whether there is evidence that the dog committed the offense and then a companion statute provides an opportunity for a hearing on the facts.

OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.156. Opportunity of dog owner to request hearing O. R. S. § 609.156

This Oregon statute provides that, prior to making a determination whether a dog has killed, wounded, injured or chased livestock, a county shall provide an opportunity for the dog owner to receive a hearing.  This shall be reasonably calculated to ensure that the owner apprise the dog owner of the specific behavior and incident alleged and the possible penalties, and to provide the dog owner with a fair opportunity for making the hearing request.

OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.158. Hearings; notice of determination to owner; reexamination O. R. S. § 609.158

This Oregon statute provides that a hearing may be conducted and a determination whether a dog has killed, wounded, injured or chased livestock may be made by the county governing body or any members thereof, the dog control board or any members thereof or a county hearings officer.

OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.162. Guidelines for imposing reasonable measures, civil penalties or other sanctions O. R. S. § 609.162

This Oregon statute provides that if a county determines under ORS 609.156 (2) or after a full and fair hearing that a dog has engaged in killing, wounding, injuring or chasing livestock, the county shall take action in accordance with the listed statutory guidelines.  Generally, if the dog has engaged in the chasing behavior previously, but has not killed livestock, the county will take reasonable measures to prevent another incident (pledge from owner, confine the dog, and a civil penalty(fine)).  If the dog has previously killed livestock, then the owner may be required to surrender the dog for adoption, remove the dog to an area deemed safe to livestock,  or require the dog be put to death.  If the dog killed livestock, and has previously killed livestock, the county shall require the dog be removed from a livestock area or be put to death.

OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.163. Enhanced penalties for habitual violators O. R. S. § 609.163

This Oregon statute provides enhanced civil penalties (fines) for owners of dogs previously convicted of chasing, injuring, or killing livestock.  The owners must have been previously assessed a penalty to receive the enhanced fine.

OR - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws O. R. S. § 87.172, O. R. S. § 433.340 - 405; O. R. S. § 609.010 - 994; O. R. S. § 498.102, 106, and 164; O.R.S. § 646A.07 - 077

These Oregon statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing and registration requirements, rabies control laws, and a comprehensive section on damage done by dogs, especially as it concerns the destruction of livestock.

OR - Fur - 167.390. Commerce in fur of domestic cats and dogs O. R. S. § 167.390

In Oregon, a person may not take, buy, sell, barter or otherwise exchange for commerce in fur purposes the raw fur or products that include the fur of a domestic cat or dog if the fur is obtained through a process that kills or maims the cat or dog. Violation is a Class A misdemeanor when the offense is committed with a culpable mental state as defined in ORS 161.085.

OR - Impound - 609.090. Impounding dogs running at large; disposition of chasing, menacing or biting dogs and other dogs; fees; O. R. S. § 609.090

This Oregon statute provides that when a dog is running at large contrary to state or municipal law, a police or dog control officer shall impound it.  Unless claimed by its owner, a dog will be held at least five days if it has a license tag.  A "reasonable effort" shall be made to notify the keeper of a dog before the dog is removed from impoundment.  This statute also states that, upon finding that the dog has menaced or chased a person when on premises other than the premises occupied exclusively by the keeper or has bitten a person, the dog control board or county governing body may order that the dog be killed in a humane manner.  Before ordering that the dog be killed, the board or governing body shall consider the factors described in ORS 609.093 and issue written findings on those factors.  A keeper of the dog may also file a petition to prevent the destruction.  If the dog is not killed, the board or governing body may impose reasonable restrictions on the keeping of the dog.

OR - Licenses - 609.060. Notice by publication of election result; dogs running at large prohibited; violations O. R. S. § 609.060

This Oregon statute provides that if a governing body of a county by ordinance, or a measure approved by the electors in an election prohibits dogs from running at large, the county shall give notice, by publication in a newspaper having a general circulation in the county. If after 60 days from the notice, a keeper violates the running at large ordinance, he or she commits a Class B violation.

OR - Ordinances - 609.015. Application of state law O. R. S. § 609.015

This Oregon statute provides that ORS 609.030 and 609.040 to 609.110 apply in every county except as otherwise provided by county charter or ordinance. ORS 609.030 and 609.040 to 609.110 do not limit the powers of cities and counties to adopt ordinances and regulations relating to the control of dogs.  A county dog licensing and control program shall not apply within the limits of a city that has its own dog licensing and control program.

OR - Ordinances - Application of ORS 609.156, 609.162 and 609.168 (to dog ordinances) O. R. S. § 609.135

This Oregon statute provides that ORS 609.156, 609.162 and 609.168 (related to hearings, penalties, and reexamination for dogs found to be chasing, worrying, or injuring livestock) apply in every county having a dog control program.  It also extends other state dog provisions to counties.

OR - Pet Dealers - 609.520. Inspection of records; procedure for obtaining animal held by dealer; failure to turn over animal; i O. R. S. § 609.520

This Oregon statute sets out the right of a person to inspect a pet dealer's business for the purpose of finding a lost companion animal.  The statute also outlines acceptable methods to prove ownership and the procedure for resolving a dispute of ownership.

OR - Property - 609.020. Dogs declared personal property O.R.S. § 609.020

Dogs are considered personal property in Oregon.

PA - Dangerous - § 459-507-A. Construction of article (dangerous dogs) 3 P.S. § 459-507-A

This Pennsylvania statute provides the construction of the dangerous dog chapter in the state.  It outlines the exceptions under the dangerous dog law as well as the enforcement procedure for one who is attacked by such dog.  It also specifically states that any provisions of local ordinances relating to dangerous dogs are hereby abrogated.  Further, a local ordinance otherwise dealing with dogs may not prohibit or otherwise limit a specific breed of dog.

PA - Dog - § 550. General immunity from noise 3 P.S. § 550

This Pennsylvania statute provides that a ll owners and operators of dog training and special retriever training areas licensed by the Pennsylvania Game Commission shall be exempt and immune from any civil action or criminal prosecution in any manner relating to noise provided they were and remain in compliance with any applicable noise control laws or ordinances at the time the permit for establishment of the training area was authorized.

PA - Dog Law - Chapter 8. Dogs (consolidated dog laws) 3 P.S. § 459-101 - 1205; 3 P.S. § 501, 531 - 532, 550 - 551; 34 Pa.C.S.A. § 2381 - 2386; 34 Pa.C.S.A. § 2941 - 2945

These statutes represent Pennsylvania's Dog Law, and contain provisions related to licensing, rabies quarantines, kennels, and the dangerous dog chapter.  The significant features of the law include a statewide control requirement for dogs (Section 305) and provisions for "dangerous dogs" (Section 501 et. seq.).  Under the latter, any person may kill any dog which he sees in the act of pursuing or wounding or killing any domestic animal, including household pets, or pursuing, wounding or attacking human beings, whether or not such a dog bears a required license tag.  There is no liability on such persons in damages or otherwise for such killing.

PA - Kennels - § 551. Nuisances and injunction 3 P.S. § 551

This Pennsylvania statute provides that the owners or operators of licensed dog training areas shall not be subject to any action for nuisance, and no court in this Commonwealth shall enjoin the use or operation of training areas on the basis of noise or noise pollution, provided that the owners were and remain in compliance with any applicable noise control laws or ordinances at the time the permit for establishment of the training areas was authorized.

PA - Ordinances - § 23144. To tax and destroy dogs 53 P.S. § 23144

This briefly worded Pennsylvania statute presumably gives municipalities the authority "[t]o regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and to destroy dogs found at large contrary to any ordinance."

PA - Ordinances - § 459-1201. Applicability to cities of the first class, second class, second class A and third class 3 P.S. § 459-1201

This Pennsylvania statute provides that cities of the first and second class are not affected by state dog licensing programs; existing city-level programs remain in effect.  With cities of the third class, certain provisions of the state article on dog licensing shall not apply if the city has established a licensing program by ordinance.

PA - Ordinances - § 66530. Regulation of dogs 53 P.S. § 66530 - 66531 This Pennsylvania statute provides that the board of supervisors may by ordinance prohibit and regulate the running at large of dogs.
PA - Pet Sales - § 201-9.3. Dog purchaser protection 73 P.S. § 201-9.3

This Pennsylvania statute comprises the state's Dog Purchaser Protection law.  The law mandates disclosure of a dog's health history by a seller (defined as pet shop operator or other individual who sells dogs to the public and who owns or operates a kennel or pet shop licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture or the United States Department of Agriculture).  If, within ten days after the date of purchase, a dog purchased from a seller is determined, through physical examination, diagnostic tests or necropsy by a veterinarian, to be clinically ill or dies from any contagious or infectious illness or any parasitic illness which renders it unfit for purchase or results in its death, the purchaser may exercise one of the described statutory elections.

PA - Rabies - § 459-301. Quarantines 3 P.S. § 459-301

This Pennsylvania statute outlines the procedures and regulations relative to the state rabies quarantine procedure for dogs.  It also provides that any police officer or state dog warden may humanely kill any dog running at large in a rabies quarantined area without any liability for damages for such killing.

PA - Sterilization - § 459-910-A. Construction of article (sterilization of dogs & cats) 3 P.S. § 459-910-A

This Pennsylvania statute relates to statutory mandatory sterilization of impounded dogs and cats.  It provides that a municipal ordinance, which meets or exceeds the state sterilization requirements, shall not be affected by this article.

PR - Ordinances - § 4054 Municipal faculties in general PR ST T. 21 § 4054

This Puerto Rico statute provides that each municipality has the general power to order, regulate and resolve whatever is necessary and convenient to attend to its local needs and for its greater prosperity and development.  Among these powers is the power to regulate whatever concerns stray domestic animals, including euthanasia and disposal in interest of the public health, establishing rules and conditions under which they can be rescued by their owners, the muzzling and licensing of dogs, and the adoption and implementation of such precautionary measures that are necessary or convenient to protect the public health as it may be affected by domestic stray animals.

RI - Dangerous Dog - § 4-13.1-9. Penalties for violation--Licensing ordinances and fees Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13.1-9

This Rhode Island statute provides that a vicious dog may be confiscated by a dog officer and destroyed in an expeditious and humane manner after the expiration of a five day waiting period if an owner does not secure liability insurance, have his or her dog properly identified, or properly enclose/restrain the dog.  If any dog declared vicious under § 4-13.1-11, when unprovoked, kills, wounds, or worries or assists in killing or wounding any described animal, the owner shall pay a five hundred fifty dollar fine.  The dog officer is empowered to confiscate the dog.  The statute further provides that municipalities may enact vicious dog licensing ordinances and provide for impoundment of dogs that violate such ordinances.  It also outlines other actions owners of vicious dogs must take, including the posting of vicious dog signs and the maintenance of proper insurance.

RI - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-1 - 42; § 4-13.1 - 15; § 4-19-1 - 21

These statutes comprise Rhode Island's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, which are specified by county or town, vicious dog laws, and euthanasia provisions.

RI - Immunity - § 4-15-15. Veterinarian's emergency treatment of animals--Immunity from liability Gen.Laws 1956, § 4-15-15

This Rhode Island statute provides that any licensed veterinarian of this state has the right to treat any animal which has become injured upon any public highway of this state or upon any public or private property of this state which is transported to that veterinarian by any person.  If in the veterinarian's opinion the injuries sustained by the animal will result in death, the veterinarian has the right to apply euthanasia to eliminate any unnecessary suffering.  Further, any animal treated by the veterinarian not reclaimed within 72 hours may be relinquished to the appropriate animal control facility.  A veterinarian incurs no civil liability for actions taken in treating such animals.

RI - Impound - § 4-13-15. Collaring of dogs--Impoundment and disposition of uncollared dogs Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-15

This Rhode Island statute provides that every owner of a dog must collar his or her dog around its neck and distinctly marked with its owner's name and its registered number.  Interestingly, it states that "any person" may cause any dog not so collared to be impounded in the public pound of the town or city where the dog is found.  Further, if the dog is not claimed by its owner within a period of five days after the impoundment, the dog may be disposed of or destroyed.  This statute also provides additional specific provisions for the towns of Glocester, West Warwick, and Exeter.

RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-1. Regulatory ordinances--Enforcement and penalties Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-1

This Rhode Island statute first provides that city or town councils may make any ordinances concerning dogs in their cities or towns as they deem expedient, to be enforced by the destruction or disposition of the animal, or by pecuniary penalties.  It then outlines that specific ordinances that several cities are authorized to enact and what terms must be included.

RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-1.1. Towns of Portsmouth, West Warwick, and Middletown and city of Woonsocket--Vicious dog ordinance Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-1.1

This Rhode Island statute provides that the town councils of the towns of Portsmouth, West Warwick and Middletown may, by ordinance, provide that the owner or keeper of any dog that assaults any person shall be fined an amount not less than one hundred dollars ($100) nor more than two hundred dollars.  The investigation must prove that the dog was off the owner's property or that the assault was the result of owner negligence.  It further provides that, in the city of Woonsocket, an owner shall not be declared negligent if an injury is sustained by a person who was committing a trespass or other tort upon the owner's premises or was teasing, tormenting, provoking, abusing or assaulting the dog or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.

RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-15.1. Ordinances concerning unrestricted and vicious dogs prohibited--Leash laws Gen.Laws 1956, § 4-13-15.1 This Rhode Island statute provides that city or town councils may make any ordinances concerning dogs in their cities or towns as the councils deem expedient, pertaining to the conduct of dogs.  The statute outlines specifically what the ordinances may address, including regulations relating to unrestricted dogs, leash laws, confinement, and destruction of vicious dogs.  The statute also adds additional provisions relating to the towns of Westerly and Exeter.
RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-3. Prior ordinances preserved RI ST § 4-13-3 This Rhode Island statute provides that nothing in the state laws concerning dogs shall be construed as to repeal any ordinance concerning dogs, which has been passed by any town or city council.
RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-8. Disposition of license fees Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-8

This Rhode Island statute provides that towns and cities may adopt ordinances or regulations concerning the use of money received for dog licenses. 

RI - Rabies - § 4-13-29.1. Responsibility for local rabies control Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-29.1

This Rhode Island statute provides that towns and cities are required to provide for the control of rabies in cats, dogs, and ferrets within its boundaries.  The municipality may elect to adopt into ordinance provisions at least as stringent as this chapter.

RI - Spay/Neuter - Chapter 19. Animal Care. § 4-19-18. Penalties for violations Gen.Laws 1956, § 4-19-18

This Rhode Island statute provides that violations of § 4-19-16, relating to the mandatory spay/neuter agreement from a licensed releasing agency. Violations of the written agreement executed pursuant to § 4-19-16 by an adopting party are punishable by a fine of fifty dollars ($50.00) for the first offense, one hundred fifty dollars ($150) for the second offense and four hundred dollars ($400) for the third and subsequent offenses. Second and subsequent offenses may constitute grounds for seizure and forfeiture of the dog or cat.

SC - Bite - § 47-3-110. Liability for attacks by dogs, provoked attacks, trained law enforcement dogs. Code 1976 § 47-3-110

This South Carolina statute provides that if a person is bitten or otherwise attacked by a dog while the person is in a public place or is lawfully in a private place, including the property of the dog owner or person having the dog in the person's care or keeping, the dog owner or person having the dog in the person's care or keeping is liable for the damages suffered by the person bitten or otherwise attacked. If a person provokes a dog into attacking him then the owner of the dog is not liable.

SC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Code 1976 § 16-13-60; Code 1976 § 23-1-100; Code 1976 § 23-23-140; Code 1976 § 1-1-655; Code 1976 § 47-3-10 - 970; Code 1976 § 47-5-10 - 210; Code 1976 § 47-7-10 - 170; Code 1976 § 50-11-65, § 50-11-770, § 50-11-780, and § 51-3-145

These statutes comprise South Carolina's state dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws concerning damage done by dogs (especially to livestock), rabies control provisions, and registration requirements.

SC - Dogfighting - Chapter 27. Animal Fighting and Baiting Act. Code 1976 § 16-27-10 to 80

This South Carolina section comprises the state's Animal Fighting and Baiting Act.  Under the Act, any person who owns an animal for the purpose of fighting or baiting, is a party to any fighting or baiting of any animal, or obtains the use of any structure for the purpose of fighting or baiting any animal is guilty of a felony and upon conviction must be punished by a fine of $5000 or 5 years imprisonment or both.  The section also provides for seizure and forfeiture of animals used in fighting operations.

SC - Impound - § 47-3-750. Seizure and impoundment of dangerous animal. Code 1976 § 47-3-750

This South Carolina statute provides that if an animal control officer has probable cause to believe that a dangerous animal is being harbored or cared for in violation of Section 47-3-720 or 47-3-740 or 47-3-760(E), or Section 47-3-730, the agent or officer may petition the appropriate court to order the seizure and impoundment of the dangerous animal while the trial is pending.