Dogs: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
AK - Assistance Animal - Alaska's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws A. S. § 09.65.150; 11.76.130; 11.76.133

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

AK - Bite - Killing dogs annoying or evincing tendency to bite animals or fowls. AS § 03.55.030

This Alaska statute provides that any dog that habitually annoys any wild deer, reindeer, sheep, cattle, horse, or other animal or bird either domestic or wild, or evinces a disposition which makes it likely that it will without provocation bite an animal or fowl, may be lawfully killed by any person when it is found at large. The owner or keeper of the dog, if known or reasonably identifiable, shall be notified and given reasonable opportunity to restrain the dog before it is lawful to kill it.

AK - Dogs - Title 3. Agriculture and Animals. Chapter 55. Dogs. AK ST § 03.55.010 - 070

These Alaska statutes give permission to kill dangerous dogs that are running at large or those that are chasing livestock.  It also defines a dangerous dog - "Any dog which when unprovoked has ever bitten or attacked a human being is considered vicious . . ."  Notably, "[a] ny person may lawfully kill any vicious or mad dog running at large."  This section also allows a village council of an unincorporated village to destroy loose dogs in the village or otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities.

AK - Ordinances - § 03.55.070. Power of village council to control dogs AS § 03.55.070

This Alaska statute enables a village council the power to destroy loose dogs in the village and otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities.  The council may impose and enforce the provisions of a dog control ordinance in the total area within 20 miles of the village.

AL - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws AL ST § 21-7-1 - 9; § 3-1-7; § 32-5A-220

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

AL - Dog Fighting - Activities relating to fighting of dogs prohibited; violations; confiscation; procedures for disposition of Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-29

This Alabama statute constitutes the state's dogfighting law.  Under the law, it is a class C felony for any person to own, possess, keep or train any dog with the intent that such dog shall be engaged in an exhibition of fighting with another dog; for amusement or gain, to cause any dog to fight with another dog, or cause any dogs to injure each other; or to permit any of the above acts.  The law also makes it a class C felony to knowingly be present or be a spectator at dogfights.

AL - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-1 - 29; Ala. Code 1975 § 3-6-1 - 4; Ala. Code 1975 § 3-7A-1 - 16; Ala. Code 1975 § 3-8-1; Ala. Code 1975 § 9-11-305 - 307

These statutes comprise Alabama's relevant dog laws. Included among the provisions are licensing requirements, dangerous dog provisions, and the chapter on rabies.

AL - Dog Bite/Dangerous Animal - Liability of Owners of Dogs Biting or Injuring Persons. Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-1 - 6; § 3-6-1 - 4; § 3-7A-9

These Alabama statutes outline the state's dog bite law.  The law first provides that, when any person owns or keeps a vicious or dangerous animal of any kind and, as a result of his or her careless management or allowing the dog to go at liberty, and another person, without fault is injured, such owner shall be liable in damages for such injury.  If any dog shall, without provocation, bite or injure any person who is at the time at a place where he or she has a legal right to be, the owner of such dog shall be liable in damages to the person so bitten or injured.  This apparent strict liability has a mitigation provision that states that the owner of such dog shall be entitled to plead and prove in mitigation of damages that he had no knowledge of any circumstances indicating such dog to be or to have been vicious or dangerous.  If an owner, however, is aware that his or her dog is rabid at the time of the bite, he or she shall be liable for twice the damages sustained.

AL - Fur - § 13A-11-241. Cruelty in first and second degrees (dog/cat fur provision) Ala. Code 1975 § 13A-11-241

In Alabama, a person commits the crime of cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree if he or she skins a domestic dog or cat or offers for sale or exchange or offers to buy or exchange the fur, hide, or pelt of a domestic dog or cat. Cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree is a Class C felony.

AL - Impound - Destruction of impounded dogs and cats Ala. Code 1975 § 3-7A-8 This Alabama statute provides that all dogs, cats, and ferrets which have been impounded for lack of rabies immunization, after due notice has been given to the owner as provided in Section 3-7A-7, may be humanely destroyed and disposed of when not redeemed by the owner within seven days.  The owner may redeem the animal before destruction by paying the associated costs of vaccination (if no proof of prior vaccination) and impoundment.
AL - Impound - Maintenance of pound; notice of impoundment; adoption of animals. Ala. Code 1975 § 3-7A-7 This Alabama statute provides that it is the duty of each and every county in the state to provide a suitable county pound and impounding officer for the impoundment of dogs, cats, adn ferrets found running at large in violation of the provisions of this chapter.  When dogs and cats are impounded and if the owner thereof is known, such owner shall be given direct notice of the impoundment of said animal or animals belonging to him; or the impounding officer may make said animal or animals available for adoption after a period of not less than seven days.
AL - Leash - When dogs permitted in areas; liability of owners of dogs at large in areas (wildlife management areas) Ala. Code 1975 § 9-11-305 - 307

This Alabama statute provides that no dog shall be permitted except on leash within any wildlife management area except in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the Commissioner of Conservation and Natural Resources.  The owner of any dog at large within any wildlife management area shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

AL - Sterilization - Chapter 9. Sterilization of Dogs and Cats. Ala. Code 1975 § 3-9-1 - 4

These statutes require animal shelters, animal control agencies, and humane societies to sterilize dogs and cats acquired from other animal shelters, animal control agencies, and humane societies.  For purposes of this statute, the term "sterilization" refers to the surgical removal of the reproductive organs of a dog or cat in order to render the animal unable to reproduce.  Adoptive animals must be sterilized by a licensed veterinarian before the animal is released to the new owner, or the new owner must enter into a written agreement with the facility certifying that sterilization will be performed by a licensed veterinarian within 30 days after acquisition of the animal or within 30 days of the sexual maturity of the animal. 

AR - Assistance Animal - Arkansas Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws AR ST § 20-14-301 to 308

The following statute comprises the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog law.

AR - Breed - Wolf-Hybrid - Wolf-Hybrid Vaccination A.C.A. § 20-19-406

This Arkansas statute outlines the procedure for vaccination of wolf-hybrid dogs, including procedures for handling bites by these canines.

AR - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws AR ST §§ 20-19-101 to 408; § 2-40-110; § 2-39-110; § 15-41-113; § 15-42-303; § 5-54-126

These Arkansas statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions including licensing laws, rabies control, and mandatory sterilization laws.  Also contained is the state's Wolf-Hybrid statutory section.

AR - Exotic Pets - Subchapter 4. Ownership and Breeding of Wolves and Wolf-Dog Hybrids A.C.A. § 20-19-401 - 408

This chapter of Arkansas laws concerns the regulation of wolves and wolf-dog hybrids kept as companion animals. Under the law, a "wolf-dog hybrid” means any animal which is publicly acknowledged by its owner as being the offspring of a wolf and domestic dog; however, no animal may be judged to be a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid based strictly on its appearance. The specific rabies vaccination requirements for wolf-dog hybrids are detailed as well as confinement requirements (i.e, specific fence dimensions). If a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid bites a person or injures or destroys another animal while out of its confined area, the person responsible for the adequate confinement of the animal upon conviction shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.

AR - Ordinances - Regulation by suburban improvement district (dogs/cats). A.C.A. § 14-16-701

This Arkansas statute provides that, upon the written request of the governing body of a suburban improvement district (as defined by statute), a county may by ordinance control and regulate dogs and cats within all or any part of the suburban improvement district.  This statute does not elaborate on the confines of such ordinances, so it is assumed the subject matter is constrained only through preemption.

AR - Ordinances - § 14-54-1102. Dogs running astray. A.C.A. § 14-54-1102

This Arkansas statute provides that municipal corporations have the power to prevent the running at large of dogs and the injuries and annoyances associated with them.  Further, this statute allows municipalities to authorize the destruction or impoundment of dogs if found in violation of ordinance.  However, prior  to destroying the dog, the municipality shall give the dog's owner at least five (5) days' notice of the date of the proposed destruction of the dog by certified mail if the dog carries the owner's address.

AR - Pet Sales - Chapter 97. Retail Pet Stores. AR ST §§ 4-97-101 to 109

This statutory section comprises the Arkansas Retail Pet Store Consumer Protection Act of 1991.  The purpose of the act is to ensure that purchasers receive consumer animals that are physically and temperamentally sound, healthy, and fit as companions.  The Act also provides a means by which the acquisition and care of those animals can be monitored.

AZ - Assistance Animal - Arizona's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws A. R. S. § 11-1024, § 13-2910

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

AZ - Dog - Arizona Consolidated Dog Laws A. R. S. § 11-1001 - 1029; AZ ST § 28-2422 - 2422.02; AZ ST § 17-309

These Arizona statutes comprise the laws relating to dogs and animal bites.  Included are provisions related to registration, collaring, and vaccination of dogs.  With regard to dangerous dogs, Arizona law provides that a person with knowledge of a dog's vicious propensity must also keep the dog in an enclosed yard or confined area with a sign indicating the dog's vicious tendencies.

AZ - Dog Ordinances - Powers and duties of board of supervisors (dogs/animals) A. R. S. § 11-1005

This Arizona statute provides that each county board of supervisors may regulate dogs, including the designation of a county enforcement agent, contracting with any city or town to enforce the provisions of any ordinance enacted by such city or town for the control of dogs, and f or the unincorporated areas of the county, by ordinance, regulate, restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs and the excessive and unrestrained barking of dogs.  They may also establish either civil or criminal penalties for violations of the above ordinances and establish a rabies quarantine zone.

AZ - Leash Laws - Article 6. Animal Control. A. R. S. § 11-1012

This Arizona laws provides generally that no female dog in her breeding season or vicious dog may be allowed to go at large.  It further delineates the state's leash requirements for dogs, including during times of rabies quarantines, in state parks, and at public schools.  Exceptions under the law include the training of livestock dogs and hunting dogs, among others.

AZ - License and Vaccination Ordinances - Exemption of cities, towns and counties (dogs/animals) A. R. S. § 11-1018

This Arizona statute exempts cities or towns from the provisions of this article if they impose a license fee and vaccination on dogs by ordinance, provided that such ordinance is equal to or more stringent than the provisions of this article.  Further, t he provisions of this article shall not apply to counties which regulate the running at large of dogs in the unincorporated areas of the county by ordinance provided that such ordinance is equal to or more stringent than the provisions of this article.

AZ - Municipalities - Dog Regulations A.R.S. § 9-240 This Arizona statute allows common councils to regulate dogs running at large.
AZ - Ordinances - Article 2. Board of Trustees Government After Disincorporation. A. R. S. § 9-219 This Arizona statute provides that the board of trustees of a city may p ass ordinances not inconsistent or in conflict with the laws of this state.  More specifically, this statute provides that the board may restrain , under penalties, the running at large of cattle or other animals, and provide rules for impounding them, and provide for taxing dogs and penalties for the nonpayment of such taxes, or the killing of dogs running at large in the corporate limits.  However, before exercising these powers, the board shall cause a resolution of intention to be recorded in minutes and then published in some daily or weekly newspaper at least two
AZ - Ordinances - Lawful presence on private property defined (dogs) A. R. S. § 11-1026

This Arizona statute provides that a person is lawfully on a dog owner's property when he or she is there as an invitee or guest, or when in the performance of a duty imposed upon him by law of the state or United States, or by ordinances of a municipality in which such property is located.

AZ - Pet Sales - Title 44. Trade and Commerce. Chapter 11. Regulations Concerning Particular Businesses. Article 17. Pet Dealers A. R. S. 44-1799 - 1799.09

This Arizona statutory section comprises the state's pet shop laws.  The section requires that retail pet sellers provide purchasers a notice of rights that includes a statement of good health signed by a veterinarian.  Purchasers have fifteen days to return unhealthy or diseased dogs and receive a refund or compensation for reasonable veterinary expenses.

CA - Animal Control - Chapter 4. Animal Control West's Ann.Cal.Health & Safety Code §§ 121875 - 121945

Beyond being domestic pets, dogs provide many services to humans, such as tracking scents and guarding facilities. Below is a collection of California laws, collectively known as the Dog Act, that set out definitions, requirements, and penalties relating to guard dogs, tracking dogs, narcotics dogs, sentry dogs and the people who handle them.

CA - Assistance Animal - California Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 600.2, 600.5, West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 54 - 55.9; West's Ann.Cal.Educ.Code § 39839; West's Ann. Cal. Food & Agric. Code § 30850 - 30854; West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121680; Cal. Vehicle Code § 21963

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

CA - Cockfighting - § 597j. Persons who own, possess or keep or train any bird or other animal with intent that it be used or en CA PENAL § 597j

This section prohibits any person from owning, possessing, or keeping any cock with the intent that it shall be used in any exhibition of fighting.

CA - Dangerous - California Dangerous Dog Statutes West's Ann. Cal. Food & Agric. Code § 31601 - 31683; West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 3342 - 3342.5; West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121685; West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 398 - 399.5

This is the California statute for the rules and regulations regarding dangerous and/or vicious dogs. It defines what constitutes a dangerous and/or vicious dog, what is to be done with said dog(s), and provides a model provision for municipalities to follow.  The other set of provisions contains the relevant dog bite law.  California has strict liability for dog bites such that liability is imposed regardless of the former viciousness of the dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.

CA - Dog Fighting - § 597.5. Fighting dogs; felony; punishment; spectators; exceptions CA PENAL § 597.5

This California statute provides that it is a felony to own, possess, keep, or train any dog, with the intent that the dog shall be engaged in an exhibition of fighting with another dog, or to cause dogs to fight for the purpose of amusement or gain.  Knowingly being a spectator at such an event constitutes a misdemeanor.

CA - Dog, dangerous - § 31625. Seizure and impoundment pending hearing West's Ann.Cal.Food & Agric.Code § 31625

This California statute allows an animal control officer or law enforcement officer to seize and impound the dog pending hearing if there is probable cause to believe the dog poses an immediate threat to public safety.  The owner or keeper of the dog shall be liable to the city or county where the dog is impounded for the costs and expenses of keeping the dog, if the dog is later adjudicated potentially dangerous or vicious.

 

CA - Dog, tether - § 122335. Animal control”, “agricultural operation”, “person”, and “reasonable period” defined; prohibition a CA HLTH & S § 122335

This California law is the state's dog tethering provision. Under the law, no person shall tether, fasten, chain, tie, or restrain a dog, or cause a dog to be tethered, fastened, chained, tied, or restrained, to a dog house, tree, fence, or any other stationary object. A person may tether, fasten, chain, or tie a dog, but it must be no longer than is necessary for the person to complete a temporary task that requires the dog to be restrained for a reasonable period. A person who violates this chapter is guilty of an infraction or a misdemeanor. An animal control may issue a correction warning to a person who violates this chapter, requiring the owner to correct the violation, in lieu of an infraction or misdemeanor, unless the violation endangers the health or safety of the animal, the animal has been wounded as a result of the activity.

CA - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 398 - 399.5, § 487e et seq, § 597b, § 597s, and § 597z; West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121575 et seq, § 121875 et seq., 122045 - 122315; West's Ann.Cal.Food & Agric.Code § 30501 - 31683; West's Ann. Cal. Fish & G. C

These statutes represent California's dog laws.  Included are provisions on county control of dogs, licensing, killing and seizure of dogs, and laws regarding dangerous or vicious dogs.

CA - Euthanasia - § 597u. Animals; prohibited killing methods CA PENAL § 597u

This statute prohibits the use by any person of carbon monoxide gas or an intracardiac injection of a euthanasia agent on a conscious animal to kill an animal.

CA - Euthanasia - § 597v. Newborn dog or cat; methods of killing CA PENAL § 597v

The statute prohibits the killing of a newborn dog or cat whose eyes have not yet opened by any other method than by the use of chloroform vapor or by inoculation of barbiturates.

CA - Euthanasia - § 599d. Policy of state regarding adoptable and treatable animals CA PENAL § 599d

This law provides that it is the policy of the state that no adoptable animal shall be euthanized.

CA - Euthanasia - § 599e. Killing unfit animals after notice by officer; offense of refusal to kill; killing by officer; excepti CA PENAL § 599e

This statute requires an owner of an animal deemed to be unfit for employment to kill the animal within 12 hours, after being notified by any peace officer, or be subject to criminal penalties.

CA - Forfeiture - § 599aa. Seizure of fighting animals and birds, paraphernalia, etc.; affidavit of officer; custody of seized p CA PENAL § 599aa

This section provides for the seizure and forfeiture of all birds, animals, paraphernalia, and any other property which is used in the fighting of birds or animals, the training of birds or animals to fight, or to inflict pain or cruelty on fighting animals.  The section outlines the procedures for seizure and forfeiture, including what is to be done with seized animals.

CA - Fur - § 598a. Killing dog or cat with intent of selling or giving away pelt; possession, sale or importation of pelt with i CA PENAL § 598a

This statute makes it a misdemeanor to kill any dog or cat with the sole intent of selling or giving away the pelt of the animal.  It also makes it a misdemeanor to possess, import into California, sell, buy, give away or accept any pelt of a dog or cat with the sole intent of selling or giving away the pelt of the dog or cat.

CA - Impound - Seizure and impoundment of dogs on private property West's Ann. Cal. Gov. Code § 53074

This California statute provides that animal control officer shall not seize or impound a dog on its owner's property for violation of a leash ordinance or issue citations for the violation of such ordinance when the dog has not strayed from the owner's private property.  However, if the dog has strayed from the property and later returned to it, an officer may issue a citation if the owner is present or impound the dog if the owner is not present.  In the latter circumstance, the officer must leave a notice of impoundment at the residence.

CA - Licenses - City dog license tags; compliance with division CA FOOD & AG § 30502

This California statute provides that any dog tag issued pursuant to ordinance by a city or county will be valid provided it complies with this division, provides for the wearing of the license tag upon the collar of the dog, and provides for the keeping of a record which shall establish the identity of the person that owns or harbors the dog.  

CA - Ordinances - Local regulations CA BUS & PROF § 7582.5

This California statute provides great deference to local municipalities by providing that regulations governing local municipalities shall not infringe upon the police powers of those local units to regulate dogs.  Specifically, it states that this chapter shall not prevent the local authorities in any city, county, or city and county, by ordinance and within the exercise of the police power of the city, county, or city and county from imposing reasonable additional requirements necessary to regulate and control protection dogs according to their local needs and not inconsistent with the provisions of this chapter.

CA - Ordinances - Regulation and control of dogs; maintenance of pound and rabies control programs; vaccination clinics; issuanc West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121690

This California statute provides that, in rabies areas, every owner of dogs older than four months shall get a new dog license at least once every two years as provided by ordinance of the responsible city, city and county, or county.  Also, every dog owner shall, at intervals of time not more often than once a year, vaccinate his or her dog against rabies.  Any dog in violation of this chapter and any additional provisions that may be prescribed by any local governing body shall be impounded, as provided by local ordinance.

CA - Pet Sales - Chapter 5. Sale of Dogs and Cats CA HLTH & S §§ 122045 - 122315

This section requires that dog breeders provide a written disclosure upon the sale of any dog with information such as the breeder’s name and address, the dog’s birth date, breed. sex, color, and vet record, and a signed statement from the breeder that the dog has no known diseases. Any breeder who knowingly sells a diseased dog faces a civil penalty. Breeders must provide dogs with sanitary housing, adequate food, water, exercise and veterinary care.

CA - Pet Shop - Sale of dogs under eight weeks of age; written approval by veterinarian prior to physical transfer; violations; CA PENAL § 597z

This new California law makes it a misdemeanor for any person to sell one or more dogs under eight weeks of age, unless, prior to any physical transfer of the dog or dogs from the seller to the purchaser, the dog or dogs are approved for sale, as evidenced by written documentation from a veterinarian licensed to practice in California.

CA - Pet Store - Chapter 9. Pet Store Animal Care Act CA HLTH & S § 122350 - 122361

This  law requires pet store operators to maintain the facility in good repair, provide proper care to animals, and clean grooming areas daily. Primary enclosures must be structurally sound, provide adequate space, be water-proof, and protect from injury. The law mandates that dogs and cats must be over eight weeks of age and weaned prior to sale. Pet store operators must ensure that veterinary records are documented in writing. Violations may be considered an infraction or a misdemeanor.

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