Dogs: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
DE - Pet Sales - CHAPTER 40. PET WARRANTIES 6 Del.C. § 4001 - 4011

This Delaware statutory section comprises the state's "pet warranty" laws.  Purchasers receive a statement of the dog's breed and any registration information when buying pets from a retail pet store under the law.  Sellers are required to disclose any known disease or illness at the time of sale.  Further, sellers must provide the following written statement when selling a registered pet:  "A pedigree or a registration does not assure proper breeding condition, health, quality or claims to lineage."  Buyers may receive a refund or replacement, or have veterinary expenses reimbursed by a seller where a dog becomes ill or dies within 20 days of purchase (or within two years for a congenital disorder).

DE - Property - § 3050F. Dogs deemed personal property; theft; penalty 16 Del.C. § 3050F

Dogs are considered personal property in Delaware.

DE - Rabies - Subchapter I. Rabies Control in Animal and Human Populations 3 Del.C. § 8201 - 8213

The purpose of this chapter is to control and suppress the spread of rabies among the domestic and wild animal populations of Delaware. Any person owning a dog 6 months of age or older in this State shall have that dog vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a cat 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the cat vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a ferret 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the ferret vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian.

DE - Spay, Neuter and Feral Cat - Subchapter II. Animal Population Control Program and Spay/Neuter Fund 16 Del.C. § 3010F - 3021F

This chapter represents Delaware's Animal Population Control Program. The section beings with findings from a 2002 study of how many dogs and cats were reclaimed, adopted out, or euthanized. It also has a definitional section that includes a definition for "feral cat." The chapter also describes its funding base and what parties are qualified to receive assistance under the Spay/Neuter Fund. Effective on June 29, 2006, it became mandatory for all cats and/or dogs of reproductive age to be spayed or neutered and inoculated for rabies prior to adoption from any private animal rescue groups and animal shelters.

DE - Tether, dog - Chapter 9. Dogs. 16 Del.C. § 3044F

This Delaware statute addresses the requirements for indoor and outdoor facilities housing dogs. It includes storage, drainage, waste disposal, ventilation, lighting, shelter, height, and surface requirements. Food, water, and use of tethers are also addressed. The tether shall be of a type commonly used for the size dog involved, made of material not normally susceptible to being severed by the dog through chewing or otherwise, and shall be attached to the dog by means of a well-fitted collar that will not cause trauma or injury to the dog. The tether shall be a minimum of 10 feet in length and allow the dog convenient access to the dog house and to food and water containers.

England - Dogs - The Docking of Working Dogs' Tails (England) Regulations 2007 2007 No. 1120

These Regulations exempt hunt, spaniel and terrier breeds from the tail docking prohibition under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, provided that certain conditions are met. Tail docking must be carried out by a veterinary surgeon, and not past 5 days old.

England - Dogs - The Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015 2015 No. 108 Regulations making it compulsory for dog owners to ensure their dog is microchipped, and that their contact details are kept up to date on a database.
England - Greyhounds - The Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 2010 No. 543 These Regulations cover license requirements, including renewal, suspension and cancellation; and license conditions for the racing of greyhounds in England. Conditions include the attendance of a veterinary surgeon at every race, kennels at races, microchipping and race injury records.
England and Wales - Dogs - The Dangerous Dogs Exemption Schemes (England and Wales) Order 2015 2015 No. 138 An order providing exemptions from the immediate destruction of a dangerous dog, by way of a Contingent Destruction Order. Following a conviction under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, the Court must either order the immediate destruction of the dog, or the contingent destruction of a dog if satisfied that the dog is not a danger to public safety. Contains conditions that must be met in relation to the dog, and requirements that the person in charge of the dog must comply with.
FL - Assistance Animal - Florida's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws West's F. S. A. § 413.08 - 081; West's F. S. A. § 316.1301, 1303; West's F. S. A. § 760.08

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

FL - Dangerous Dog - CHAPTER 767. DAMAGE BY DOGS. West's F. S. A. § 767.14 This Florida statute provides that nothing in the dangerous dog act limits the ability of local governments from enacting restrictions on dangerous dogs more severe than the state law, as long as the regulations are not breed-specific.
FL - Dogs - Florida Dog /Dangerous Dog Laws West's F. S. A. § 509.233; § 767.01 - 16; § 705.19; § 823.041; § 823.15; § 877.14

These Florida statutes outline the state's dog provisions, which mainly cover dangerous dog/dog bite laws.  The owner of any dog that bites any person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, is liable for damages suffered by persons bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of the dog or the owners' knowledge of such viciousness.  However, any negligence on the part of the person bitten that is a proximate cause of the biting incident reduces the liability of the owner of the dog by the percentage that the bitten person's negligence contributed to the biting incident.  If a dog that has previously been declared dangerous attacks or bites a person or a domestic animal without provocation, the owner is guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree.  The dog will be impounded for a period of ten days during which time the owner of the dog may request a hearing.

FL - Fur - Sale of garments or items of clothing containing dog or cat fur prohibited; West's F. S. A. § 828.1231

Makes it illegal for a person to knowingly sell or offer to sell a garment which contains dog or cat fur, or a dog or cat pelt.  Defines the first violation of this provision as a misdemeanor of the first degree, and any subsequent violations as felonies of the third degree.  Allows any law enforcement agency or humane officer to enforce this provision and to seek a civil penalty up to $5,000 for each violation.

FL - Ordinances - Interpretation of Dog Ordinances under Dangerous Dogs West's F. S. A. § 767.07

This Florida statute provides that the statutory section relating to state regulation of dangerous dogs is supplemental to all other state laws affecting dogs and shall not be construed to modify those laws or to prevent municipalities from prohibiting, licensing, or regulating the running at large of dogs within their respective limits by law or ordinance.

FL - Restaurant - 509.233. Public food service establishment requirements; local exemption for dogs West's F. S. A. § 509.233

Florida was one of the first states to enact a law on dogs in restaurants in 2006. The law allows a local unit of government to adopt an ordinance that acts as an exemption to the state's Food and Drug Administration Food Code. Once the local exemption is passed, a restaurant can apply for a permit to allow dogs in the outdoor dining spaces. Certain things must be included in the ordinance such as a requirement that staff wash after touching pets, a rule that patrons keep dogs on leashes and under control, a prohibition against dogs on chairs, tables, or other furnishings, signs that list the rules for employees and patrons, and a clean-up station in the outdoor dining area. There are also reporting requirements by the local governments to the State of Florida under the law. The city or county must also have a system in place to document and respond to complaints.

FL - Sterilization - Chapter 823. Public Nuisances West's F. S. A. § 823.15

This Florida law declares that it is the public policy of the state that every feasible means be used to reduce the incidence of birth of unneeded and unwanted puppies and kittens.  In furtherance of this policy, provision shall be made for the sterilization of all dogs and cats sold or released for adoption from any public or private animal shelter or animal control agency by either providing sterilization by a licensed veterinarian before relinquishing custody of the animal or entering into a written agreement with the adopter or purchaser guaranteeing that sterilization will be performed within 30 days or prior to sexual maturity. All costs of sterilization pursuant to this section shall be paid by the prospective adopter unless otherwise provided for by ordinance of the local governing body or provided for by the humane society governing body.

Florida - Initiatives - Amendment 13, Ban on Wagering on Dog Races Amendment 13 A proposed revision relating to ending dog racing; creating new sections in Article X and Article XII of the State Constitution to prohibit the racing of, and wagering on, greyhounds and other dogs after a specified date.
GA - Assistance Animal - Georgia's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Ga. Code Ann., § 30-4-2 to 4; Ga. Code Ann., § 40-6-94; Ga. Code Ann., § 16-12-120; Ga. Code Ann., § 16-11-107.1

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

GA - Bite - § 51-2-6. Dogs, liability of owner or keeper for injuries to livestock Ga. Code Ann., § 51-2-6 to 7

This Georgia statute represents the state's relevant dog bite strict liability law.  While the law imposes strict liability for injury to a person, the dog (or other animal) must first be considered "vicious" or "dangerous," which can be as simple as showing the animal was required to be leashed per city ordinance.  Second, the animal must be at large by the careless management of the owner.  Finally, the person injured must not have provoked the animal into attacking him or her.

GA - Dangerous Dog Ordinances - Chapter 8. Dogs Ga. Code Ann., § 4-8-29

This Georgia statute states the standards and requirements for the control of dangerous dogs and vicious dogs; this statute also proscribes penalties for violations of these standards and requirements. For instance, a violation of this article is a misdemeanor of high and aggravated nature; repeated violations of this article is a felony.

GA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Ga. Code Ann., § 4-8-1 - 45; Ga. Code Ann., § 4-14-1 - 4-15-1; Ga. Code Ann., § 26-2-160; Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-16 - 18; § 27-3-49; Ga. Code Ann., § 16-11-107 - 107.1; Ga. Code Ann., § 50-3-88

These Georgia statutes comprise the state's dog laws and the "Responsible Dog Ownership Law.".  Among the provisions of the Responsible Dog Ownership Law include a requirement for registration of dangerous dogs as well as the necessity of such owner to carry at least $50,000 in liability insurance.  Owners of these dogs who do not comply with these and other provisions may have their dogs confiscated and destroyed. Any person who violates this article is guilty of a misdemeanor.

GA - Dogfighting - Article 2. Gambling and Related Offenses. Ga. Code Ann., § 16-12-37

Georgia's dogfighting statute states that any person who owns, possesses, trains, transports, or sells any dog with the intent that such dog shall be engaged in fighting with another dog, wagers money or anything of value on the result of such dogfighting, knowingly permits dogfighting on his or her premises, knowingly promotes or advertises an exhibition of fighting commits the offense of dogfighting .  Violation of the law is a felony, with a mandatory  fine of $5,000.00 or a mandatory fine of $5,000.00 in addition to imprisonment for not less than one year nor more than five years. On a second or subsequent conviction, such person shall be punished by imprisonment of not less than one nor more than ten years, a fine of not less than $15,000.00, or both such fine and imprisonment. Any person who is knowingly present only as a spectator at any place for the fighting of dogs shall, upon a first conviction thereof, be guilty of a misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature.  

GA - Ordinances - Jurisdiction and duties of local governments Ga. Code Ann., § 4-8-22

This Georgia statute provides authority for local governing units to enforce this article. This statute further establishes that the local government shall designate an individual as a dog control officer to aid in the administration and enforcement of the provisions of this article; the dog control officer does not have the authority to make arrests unless the person is a law enforcement officer. Additionally, this article also allows local governments to make arrangements with each other for consolidation of dog control services.

GA - Rabies - Chapter 19. Control of Rabies Ga. Code Ann., § 31-19-1 to 10

This GA statute pertains to the control of rabies. Any person bitten by an animal suspected of being rabid must notify the county board of health. The owner of any animal which has bitten any person or animal, or exhibits signs of rabies, must notify the county board of health. The owner must also confine the animal. A violation is a misdemeanor.

HI - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws H R S § 711-1109.4; § 711-1109.5; § 143-4; § 347-13 - 20; H R S § 142-5.5

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

HI - Dog - General Dog Provisions H R S § 143-1 - 20; H R S § 183D-65

This Hawaii statute provides the pertinent regulations for dogs in the state.  Included in its provisions are licensing, impoundment, seizure of loose or unlicensed dogs, and stray animals.  Of particular note is a provision that makes it unlawful for any officer to knowingly sell or give any impounded dog to any person, firm, corporation, association, medical college, or university for the purpose of animal experimentation.

HI - Dog Bite - Chapter 142. Animals, Brands, and Fences. H R S § 142-74, 75

This Hawaii statute provides that the owner of any dog that has bitten a human being shall have the duty to take such reasonable steps as are necessary to prevent the recurrence of such incident.  Whenever  a dog has bitten a human being on at least two separate occasions (with no applicable exceptions), any person may bring an action against the owner of the dog.  Each county may enact and enforce ordinances regulating persons who own, harbor, or keep any dog that has bitten, injured, or maimed a person.  No ordinance enacted under this subsection shall be held invalid on the ground that it covers any subject or matter embraced within any statute or rule of the State; provided that the ordinance shall not affect the civil liability of a person owning the offending dog. 

HI - Dog Bite - CHAPTER 663. TORT ACTIONS. H R S § 663-9 - § 663-9.1

This statute represents Hawaii's relevant dog bite law.  Under the statute, an owner or harborer of an animal is strictly liable for personal or property damage to any person, regardless of the animal owner's or harborer's lack of scienter of the vicious or dangerous propensities of the animal.

HI - Impound - Chapter 143. Animals: Licenses and Regulations. H R S § 143-8

This Hawaii statute provides that, except where licensing requirements are dispensed with, every officer shall seize any unlicensed dog found running at large or found outside a sufficient enclosure even if within the immediate presence of its owner.  The animal will then be confined at a pound for forty-eight hours whereupon it can be redeemed by the owner, sold, or humanely destroyed if not reclaimed.  Each county council shall have the power to fix the impoundment fee for dogs.   

IA - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws I. C. A. § 216C.1 - 11; 321.333

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

IA - Dog - Iowa Dangerous Dog/General Dog Laws I. C. A. § 351.1 - 43; I. C. A. § 162.20; § 481A.56

These Iowa statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  With regard to damage done by dogs and dog bites, the owner of a dog shall be liable to an injured party for all damages done by the dog, when the dog is caught in the action of worrying, maiming, or killing a domestic animal, or the dog is attacking or attempting to bite a person, except when the party damaged is doing an unlawful act, directly contributing to the injury.  Further, the law states that it shall be the duty of the owner of any dog, cat or other animal which has bitten or attacked a person or any person having knowledge of such bite or attack to report this act to a local health or law enforcement official.  The section also contains general rabies vaccination provisions and a prohibition on dogs running at large (results in impoundment).

IA - Dog as property - 351.25. Dog as property I. C. A. § 351.25

This Iowa statute distinguishes between licensed and unlicensed dogs.  Specifically, it provides that all dogs under six months of age, and all dogs over said age and wearing a collar with a valid rabies vaccination tag attached to the collar, shall be deemed property. Dogs not provided with a rabies vaccination tag shall not be deemed property.

IA - Dog License - 351.27. Right to kill tagged dog I. C. A. § 351.27

This Iowas statute makes it lawful for any person to kill a dog, wearing a collar with a rabies vaccination tag attached, when the dog is caught in the act of worrying, chasing, maiming, or killing any domestic animal or fowl, or when such dog is attacking or attempting to bite a person.

IA - Dog Licenses - 351.26. Right and duty to kill untagged dog I. C. A. § 351.26

This Iowa statute makes it lawful for any person to kill a dog that is required to wear a rabies vaccination tag and is found not wearing one.  Further, it is the duty  of all peace officers within their respective jurisdictions unless such jurisdiction has provided for the seizure and impoundment of dogs, to kill these untagged dogs.

IA - Impoundment - 351.37. Dogs running at large--impoundment--disposition I. C. A. § 351.37 This Iowa statute provides that a dog shall be impounded by a local board of health or law enforcement official if the dog is running at large and the dog is not wearing a valid rabies vaccination tag.  The statute requires that written notice be sent to the owner (if the owner's name can be reasonably determined from a tag or other source) who then has seven days to redeem the dog before it is euthanized.
IA - Ordinances - 331.381. Duties relating to services I. C. A. § 331.381

This Iowa statute states that the county board shall provide for the seizure, impoundment, and disposition of dogs in accordance with chapter 351.

IA - Ordinances - 351.36. Enforcement I. C. A. § 351.36

This Iowa statute provides that local health and law enforcement officials shall enforce state provisions relating to vaccination and impoundment of dogs.  It further states that such public officials shall not be responsible for any accident or disease of a dog resulting from the enforcement of the provisions of the sections.

IA - Ordinances - Chapter 351. Dogs and Other Animals. I. C. A. § 351.41

This Iowa state provides that the chapter relating to state dogs running at large laws does not limit the power of any city or county to prohibit dogs and other animals from running at large, whether or not they have been vaccinated for rabies, and does not limit the power of any city or county to provide additional measures for the restriction of dogs and other animals for the control of rabies and for other purposes.

IA - Pet Shop - Chapter 162. Care of Animals in Commercial Establishments. I. C. A. § 162.1 to 25
The purpose of this chapter is to insure that all dogs and cats handled by boarding kennels, commercial kennels, commercial breeders, dealers, and public auctions are provided with humane care and treatment by regulating the transportation, sale, purchase, housing, care, handling, and treatment of such animals.
ID - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws I.C. §§ 18-5811 - 5812B; I.C. §§ 56-701 - 708

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

ID - Dangerous - § 25-2806. Liability for livestock and poultry killed by dogs I.C. § 25-2806

This Idaho statute provides that any owner whose dog that kills, worries, or wounds any livestock and poultry is liable to the owner of the same for the damages and costs of suit, to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction.  Further, any person, on finding any dog, not on the premises of its owner or possessor, worrying, wounding, or killing any livestock or poultry may, at the time of so finding said dog, kill the same, without liability for damages.

ID - Dangerous Dogs running at large - Chapter 28. Dogs. I.C. § 25-2805

This Idaho statute provides that any person who lets his or her dog run at large after a complaint has been made to the sheriff shall be guilty of an infraction punishable as provided in section 18-113A, Idaho Code.  Any person who lets his or her dog physically attack someone when not provoked shall be guilty of a misdemeanor in addition to any liability as provided in section 25-2806, Idaho Code.  For a second or subsequent violation of this subsection, the court may, in the interest of public safety, order the owner to have the vicious dog destroyed or may direct the appropriate authorities to destroy the dog.

ID - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws I.C. I.C. § 18-7039; § 25-2801 - 2812; § 36-1101

These Idaho statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws regarding dogs at large and vicious dogs, and immunity for acts done by law enforcement dogs.

ID - Dog License - Chapter 28. Dogs. I.C. § 25-2804

This Idaho statute provides that once a county board adopts a measure, sixty (60) days from the date of the board's meeting at which this measure is adopted, it shall be the duty of the sheriff of the county to seize and impound all unlicensed dogs at large, excluding those located in a municipality that has enacted a dog license law.  A dog impounded under this provision may be killed in a humane manner after 5 days after there has been a "reasonable effort" to locate the owner.

ID - Dog, property - Chapter 28. Dogs. I.C. § 25-2807

This Idaho statute states that dogs are considered property.  It further provides that no entity of state or local government may by ordinance or regulation prevent the owner of any dog from protecting it from loss by the use of an electronic locating collar.

ID - Facility Dog - § 19-3023 Child summoned as witness I.C. § 19-3023 This statutes provides that when a child is summoned in a criminal matter, a parent, counselor, friend, or a facility dog may stay in the courtroom during the child's testimony, unless the court finds that the defendant will be unduly prejudiced. When a child is summoned to witness in any non-criminal matter, a facility dog will be allowed to remain in courtroom during the child's testimony.
IL - Dog Bite - Chapter 510. Animals 510 ILCS 5/13

This Illinois statute provides the health procedure for dog bites.  When a state health administrator receives information that any person has been bitten by an animal, the administrator shall have such dog or other animal confined under the observation of a licensed veterinarian for a period of not less than 10 days.  People with knowledge of dog bites are required to inform the administrator or his or her representative promptly.  It is unlawful for the owner of the animal to euthanize, sell, give away, or otherwise dispose of any animal known to have bitten a person, until it is released by the administrator.

IL - Dog Fighting - Chapter 720. Criminal Offenses 720 I.L.C.S. 5/48-1

The following statute comprises Illinois' dogfighting law.  Under the law, it is a felony to promote or instigate a fight, or to train or sell a dog for dogfighting purposes.  Further, no person may solicit a minor to violate this Section. Providing equipment or aiding in providing equipment for a fight is also a felony.  Knowingly attending a dogfight is a Class 4 felony for a first violation. A second or subsequent violation of subsection (g) of this Section is a Class 3 felony.

IL - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws 510 ILCS 5/1 - 35; 510 ILCS 92/1 - 999; 510 ILCS 72/1 - 180; 740 I.L.C.S. 13/1 - 10; 55 I.L.C.S. 5/5-1071 - 1071.1; 60 I.L.C.S. 1/30-110; 520 I.L.C.S. 20/15 and 20/19; 520 I.L.C.S. 5/2.34; 105 I.L.C.S. 5/14-6.02; 65 I.L.C.S. 5/11-20-9

These statutes comprise Illinois' dog laws.  Among the provisions include the Animal Control Act, which regulates the licensing and control of dogs, the Diseased Animal Act, and the Humane Euthanasia in Animal Shelters Act.

IL - Ordinances - 5/24. Powers of municipalities and other political subdivisions to regulate dogs and other animals 510 I.L.C.S. 5/24

This Illinois statute provides that nothing in the Animal Control Act shall be held to limit the power of any municipality to prohibit animals from running at large, nor shall anything in this Act be construed to limit the power of any municipality to further control and regulate dogs, cats or other animals in such municipality or other political subdivision provided that no regulation or ordinance is specific to breed .

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