Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
CO - Impoundment - Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power. C. R. S. A. § 30-15-104

This Colorado statute immunizes the board of county commissioners or other local governing entity from liability associated with the impoundment of pet animals.  Specifically, it states the board or anyone authorized to enforce a local ordinance shall not be held responsible for any accident or subsequent disease that may occur to the animal in connection with the administration of the resolution or ordinance.

CO - Ordinances - Animal control officers--Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power. C. R. S. A. § 30-15-105 This Colorado statute provides that personnel engaged in animal control may issue citations or summonses and complaints enforcing the county dog control resolution or any other county resolution concerning the control of pet animals or municipal ordinance. Officers assigned to this capacity may be referred to as "peace officers."
CO - Endangered Species - Article 2. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation C. R. S. A. § 33-2-101 - 108

These Colorado statutes provide the State's intent to protect endangered, threatened, or rare species and defines the terms associated with the statute.  It also has a provision specific to the reintroduction of the bonytail and black-footed ferret.  Under the management program, Colorado law provides for the acquisition of habitat for species listed as well as other protective measures.

CO - Wildlife - Article 6. Law Enforcement and Penalties--Wildlife. C. R. S. A. § 33-6-101 to 142

These Colorado statutes represent Part 1 of the state's wildlife code. Among the provisions include violations for improperly taking wildlife, hunting provisions, and a law prohibiting computer-assisted remote hunting.

CO - Wildlife, nongame - Wildlife; Illegal Possession C. R. S. A. § 33-6-109 Colorado law prohibits the taking, hunting, or possession of animals deemed property of the state or wildlife taken in violation of state, federal, or non-U.S. law (including bald and golden eagles), resulting in a misdemeanor with up to one year in jail and fines. Further, there is an additional penalty for the taking of "big game" species. It is also illegal to have in one's possession any nonnative or exotic species.
CO - Wildlife trade - Illegal sale of wildlife; penalties C. R. S. A. § 33-6-113 Colorado statute addressing illegal sale of wildlife, including bears.
CO - Hunting - Willful Destruction of Wildlife C. R. S. A. § 33-6-117

Colorado has a unique statute specific to poaching for the purpose of acquiring parts or "trophies" from an animal with the intent of abandoning the carcass, or even soliciting someone else to do so.  Taking or hunting big game, eagles, or endangered species with this intent results in a felony.  The intent of the law is stated "to protect the wildlife from wanton, ruthless, or wasteful destruction or mutilation for their heads, hides, claws, teeth, antlers, horns, internal organs, or feathers."

CO - Humane Slaughter - Article 33. Custom Processing of Meat Animals. C. R. S. A. § 35-33-101 to 407

This Colorado section includes both the meat processing laws and the humane slaughter provisions.  It covers livestock, which are defined as cattle, calves, sheep, swine, horses, mules, goats, and any other animal which may be used in and for the preparation of meat or meat products.  No processor shall shackle, hoist, or otherwise bring livestock into position for slaughter or shall slaughter livestock except by humane methods as defined by regulation; the use of a manually operated hammer, sledge, or poleax is not permitted.  Additionally, poultry shall be slaughtered in accordance with "good commercial practices" and in a manner that will result in thorough bleeding.  Any person who violates any provision is subject to a civil penalty of not more than $750 per violation for each day of violation and commits a class 2 misdemeanor.

CO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws C. R. S. A. § 35-43-126; § 13-21-124; § 24-80-910.5; § 25-4-601 to 615; § 30-15-101 to 105; § 33-3-106; § 33-4-101.3; § 33-6-128; § 35-42.5-101; § 35-50-112

These Colorado statutes represent the state's dog laws. There are provisions regarding civil actions against dog owners for dog bites, rabies control, animal control and licensing, and pertinent wildlife regulations, such as a general ban on harassing wildlife and destroying dens or nests. However, there is an exception making it permissible to take wildlife when it is causing excessive damage to property.

CO - Farming - Article 50.5. Confinement of Calves Raised for Veal and Pregnant Sows C. R. S. A. § 35-50.5-101 to 103 This 2008 Colorado statute applies to the confinement of calves raised for veal and pigs during pregnancy. This statute provides that calves raised for veal and sows during pregnancy must be able to lie down, stand up, and turn around without touching the sides of their enclosure.
CO - Pet Shop - Article 80. Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act C. R. S. A. § 35-80-101 - 117 This Colorado Act regulates pet animal facilities (i.e., shelters, large kennels, and breeders). The Act covers licensing of the facilities and those activities deemed unlawful, such as selling a kitten or puppy under the age of 8 weeks and refusing a lawful inspection.
CO - Impound - Colorado Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act C. R. S. A. § 35-80-106.3

This is an example of a state statute that creates minimum holding periods that shelters must hold found pets for before allowing the pets to be adopted or otherwise disposed of.

CO - Exotic - Article 81. Hybrid Animals C. R. S. A. § 35-81-101 to 102

This Colorado statute authorized the commissioner of the department of agriculture to appoint and convene an advisory group to study the behavior of hybrid canids (wolf hybrids) and felines, including a review of any incidents involving property damage and personal injury caused by such animals. The department was to present its findings and proposals for legislation in January of 1998.

CT - Research animals - § 10a-150e. Offering for adoption of cat or dog used for conducting research or testing C.G.S.A. § 10a-150e

This Connecticut law (effective 2016) states that an institute of higher education must offer for adoption by an animal adoption or animal rescue organization any cat or dog that that was subject to research or testing after the completion of any such research or testing and the dog or cat is no longer needed.

CT - Vehicle - Title 14. Motor Vehicles. Use of the Highway by Vehicles. Gasoline C.G.S.A. § 14-226 Any person who knowingly operates a motor vehicle and causes injury or death to a dog shall stop and render assistance and shall immediately report such injury or death to the dog's owner or the owner's representative. If unable to ascertain and locate such owner or representative, the injury or death shall be reported to a police officer. Violation of any provision of this section shall be an infraction.
CT - Cruelty, reporting - § 17a-100a. Reporting of neglected or cruelly treated animals. C.G.S.A. § 17a-100a, C.G.S.A. § 17a-100c

These Connecticut statutes require state employees who work with children and families to also report suspected animal harm, neglect, or cruelty. The statutes explain how the reporting should be completed and describes the implementation of training programs for employees to recognize animal abuse. The statutes also discuss the development of an annual report on acutal or suspected instances of animal neglect or cruelty within the state.  

CT - Feral Cats - § 22-339d. Municipal control of feral cats C.G.S.A. § 22-339d

This Connecticut statute permits municipalities to adopt ordinances requiring registration of feral cat "keepers," defined as anyone who harbors or regularly feeds a feral cat.   If a municipality enacts such an ordinance, the ordinance must require the keeper to sterilize the cat and have it vaccinated against rabies.  The statute also enables municipalities to adopt ordinances holding cat owners and keepers responsible if their cats cause significant property damage or severe health violations.

CT - Horse - § 22-415. Inhumane transportation of equines. Penalty. Regulations C.G.S.A. § 22-415 This Connecticut law makes it unlawful to carry any equine in an unnecessarily cruel or inhumane manner, or in a way and manner which might endanger the equine or knowingly and wilfully authorizes or permits such equine to be subjected to unnecessary torture, suffering or cruelty of any kind. Violation results in a fine of not less than one hundred dollars or more than five hundred dollars. [Also see the administrative regulations at https://www.animallaw.info/administrative/connecticut-equines-transportation-equines].
CT - Reindeer - 26-57a. Regulations for the establishment of in-state captive herds of cervids. C.G.S.A. § 26-57a This Connecticut law relates to the regulation of in-state captive herds of cervids, including reindeer. Under the law, not later than November 1, 2012, the Commissioner of Agriculture shall implement a pilot program for the issuance of two permits that allow not more than two Connecticut businesses to maintain not more than five reindeer each.
CT - Domestic Violence - § 46b-15. Relief from physical abuse by family C.G.S.A. § 46b-15

Under this Connecticut law, any family or household member who has been subjected to a continuous threat of present physical pain or physical injury by another family may apply to the Superior Court for an order of protection . Under subsection (b), The court may also make orders for the protection of any animal owned or kept by the applicant including, but not limited to, an order enjoining the respondent from injuring or threatening to injure such animal.

CT - Lien, care - § 49-70. Lien on animals for their keep. Transfer of abandoned animals C.G.S.A. § 49-70

This Connecticut law provides that when a special agreement has been made between the owner of any animals and a person keeping/taking care of such animals for a price, those animals are subject to a lien in favor of the person keeping the animals. The person keeping those animals may detain the animals until the debt is paid. If the debt is not paid with 30 days after it becomes due, the keeper may sell the animals at public auction after he or she gives written notice to the owner of the time and place at least six days before the sale. Additionally, a commercial boarding kennel or veterinary hospital may transfer abandoned animals to a nonprofit animal rescue or adoption organization. An animal is considered abandoned if the owner or keeper of such animal fails to retrieve the animal within five days of the date on which such owner or keeper was scheduled to retrieve the animal. Written notice notice sent certified, return-receipt requested must first be sent to the owner with a ten-day waiting period before the transfer can occur.

CT - Facility - § 51-10d. Judicial Branch Internet web site. Notice and information re animal-assisted therapy C.G.S.A. § 51-10d This Connecticut law enacted in 2017 states that the Judicial Branch shall maintain on its Internet web site (1) notice that the court may exercise its discretion to permit a dog to provide comfort and support to a testifying witness, (2) a hyperlink to the Internet web site of an organization that provides information regarding animal-assisted therapy resources, and (3) if applicable, a hyperlink to information regarding such resources on the Internet web site of the Division of Criminal Justice.
CT - Cruelty - § 54-86n. Appointment of advocate in proceeding re the welfare or custody of a cat or dog. C.G.S.A. § 54-86n This 2016 law states that, in a cruelty or welfare proceedings, the court may order, upon its own initiative or upon request of a party or counsel for a party, that a separate advocate be appointed to represent the interests of justice. That advocate can monitor the case and supply the court with information about the welfare of the cat or dog. The Department of Agriculture shall maintain a list of attorneys with knowledge of animal issues and the legal system and a list of law schools that have students, or anticipate having students, with an interest in animal issues and the legal system. Such attorneys and law students shall be eligible to serve on a voluntary basis as advocates under this section.
CO - Vehicle, animal - § 13-21-108.4. Persons rendering emergency assistance from a locked vehicle C.R.S.A. § 13-21-108.4, C.R.S.A. § 18-1-706.5 This Colorado law allows the rescue of animals and "at-risk persons" from locked vehicles under certain conditions. "Animal" defined as cat or dog and specifically excludes livestock. A person is immune from civil or criminal liability for property damage resulting from forcible entry into locked vehicle if all of the following occurs: (1) an animal is present and the person has a reasonable belief that the animal is in imminent danger of death or suffering serious bodily injury; (2) the person determines the vehicle is locked and forcible entry is necessary; (3) the person makes reasonable effort to locate the owner as outlined in the law; (4) the person contacts law enforcement/911/emergency responders prior to forcibly entering vehicle; and he or she remains with vehicle until law enforcement/responders arrive.
CO - Police Training - Dog Protection Act C.R.S.A. § 29-5-112 This Colorado statute requires local law enforcement to undergo training in order to prevent the shooting of dogs by local law enforcement officers in the line of duty. Specifically, this statute aims to assist in training officers to differentiate between threatening and non-threatening dog behaviors, as well as to employ non-lethal means whenever possible.
CO - Lien, veterinary - Part 1. Lien on Personal Property. C.R.S.A. § 38-20-102, 103 These Colorado laws concern liens on pet animals for persons who are entrusted with caring for the animals. Under 38-20-102, any feeder, veterinarian, or other person entrusted with the pet for feeding, keeping, boarding, or medical shall have a lien for the amount of costs incurred in the care of the animal. Any contracts (or copies thereof) made by the owner of the pet animal with the person caring for the animals may be filed with the county clerk where the owner resides (or where the contract was made for non-residents). The filing of this contract constitutes notice to the contents of the contract and the legal effect of the filing.
CA - Hunting, Internet - § 3003. Internet hunting and associated activities. Cal. Fish & Game Code §3003

This statute prohibits Internet hunting in the State of California. Under the law, it is unlawful to own or operate a shooting range or site for the purpose of online shooting or spearing of an animal. It is also unlawful to create, maintain, or utilize an Internet Web site, or other service or business in this state, for the purpose of online shooting or spearing of a bird or mammal.

CA - Historical - 1872: Cruelty to Animals Cal. Penal Code 597 (1872) Enacted February 14, 1872 (almost identical with Field's Draft, Section 699), and then read: "Every person who maliciously kills, maims, or wounds an animal, the property of another, or who maliciously and cruelly beats, tortures, or injures any animal, whether belonging to himself or another, is guilty of a misdemeanor."
CA - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty and Penal Code Sections Cal. Penal Code §§ 286.5; 596 - 600.5

These sections from the California Penal Code detail the crimes associated with animals, including anti-cruelty provisions, animal fighting statutes, unlawful killing methods, horse-specific laws, and a miscellaneous section containing provisions related to guide dogs, police dogs, bestiality, etc.

CA - Historical - General Laws of 1913: Title 14: Section 596-599f Cal. Penal Code §§ 597 - 599f (1913) The General Laws of California from 1913, title 14, covers Malicious Mischief which includes sections concerning: Cruelty to Animals, Poisoning of Cattle, killing of birds in cemeteries and killing of gulls or cranes. The Cruelty to Animal section describes laws concerning horses, abandoned animal, torture and maiming of animals, use of animals in fights, and arrest without warrants. In addition, the section covers evidence, stallions, and impounding without food and water. The section about the killing of birds in the cemetery concerns also killing and detaining of homing pigeons. The last section about killing of gulls and cranes also concerns the destruction of eggs and nests. In addition, the section covers killing of elk and prosecution for these offenses.
Canada - Federal Cruelty to Animals Canada R.S.C. 1985, c. C46 This section of the criminal code is the national anti-cruelty law for Canada.
NO - Aquaculture - Regulations concerning abattoirs and processing plants for aquaculture animals Chap. 1 - 5, Regulations concerning abattoirs and processing plants for aquaculture animals

The purpose of these regulations is to promote good health in aquaculture animals and ensure good fish welfare.

UK - Wildlife Trade - Ivory Act 2018 Chapter 30 This Act prohibits commercial activities concerning ivory in the UK and the import and re-export of ivory for commercial purposes to and from the UK. This includes: buying, selling and hiring ivory; offering or arranging to buy, sell or hire ivory; keeping ivory for sale or hire; exporting ivory from, and importing ivory to the United Kingdom for sale or hire. Minor exemptions include: pre-1918 items of outstanding artistic etc value and importance; pre-1975 musical instruments; and acquisition of items by qualifying museums.
MT - Animal Welfare - Animal Welfare Act Chapter 439, Act XXV

The purpose of this Act is to establish and consolidate the protection of animals kept for work, sport, companionship, and food. The term "animal" is defined under the Act as ‘all living members of the animal kingdom, other than human beings, and includes free-living larval and, or, reproducing larval forms, but does not include foetal or embryonic forms.’

UK- Wildlife - Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 Chapter 69 An Act prohibiting and limiting actions involving wild animals, and the primary piece of legislation for wildlife protection in the UK. Prohibitions include taking, injuring, killing and disturbing. It is also an offence to disturb places used for shelter and protection. Provides protections for wild bird nests and eggs, as well as for animal species. Proof of intention is required for an offence under the Act.
Brazil - Constitution (Portuguese) - Constituiclo Federal do Brazil - Protecclo dos Animais CHAPTER VI, ART. 225

Constituiclo Federal do Brazil - Protecclo dos Animais

Poarch Creek Band of Indians of Alabama. 8-6-31-Cruelty to Animals Chapter VI, Title 8, Section 8-6-31 Under Sec. 8-6-31, cruelty to animals is a Class A Misdemeanor. A person who, without justification, knowingly or negligently subjects an animal to mistreatment by actions defined in the statute commit the crime of cruelty to animals.
NO - Aquaculture - Regulations relating to Operation of Aquaculture establishments Chapters 1 - 5, Regulations relating to Operation of Aquaculture establishments

The purpose of these Regulations is to contribute to the sustainable development of the aquaculture industry and to its development as a profitable, competitive and viable coastal industry. The purpose is also to promote good health in aquaculture animals and ensure good fish welfare.

NO - Aquaculture - Regulation concerning Transportation of Aquaculture Animals Chapters 1 - 6 , Regulation concerning Transportation of Aquaculture Animals

The purpose of this regulation is to promote good aquatic animal health and ensure good fish welfare during transportation.

CO - Fur - § 12b. Prohibited methods of taking wildlife (Constitutional Provision) CO CONST Art. 18, § 12b

This Colorado constitutional provision provides that it is unlawful to take wildlife with any leghold trap, any instant kill body-gripping design trap, or by poison or snare in the state of Colorado subject to the listed exceptions.

SC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Code 1976 § 16-13-60; Code 1976 § 23-1-100; Code 1976 § 23-23-140; Code 1976 § 1-1-655; Code 1976 § 47-3-10 - 990; Code 1976 § 47-5-10 - 210; Code 1976 § 47-7-10 - 170; Code 1976 § 50-11-65, § 50-11-770, § 50-11-780, and § 51-3-145; Code 1976 § 50-19-960 These statutes comprise South Carolina's state dog laws. Among the provisions include laws concerning damage done by dogs (especially to livestock), rabies control provisions, and registration requirements.
SC - Dogfighting - Chapter 27. Animal Fighting and Baiting Act. Code 1976 § 16-27-10 to 80 This South Carolina section comprises the state's Animal Fighting and Baiting Act. Under the Act, any person who owns an animal for the purpose of fighting or baiting, is a party to any fighting or baiting of any animal, or obtains the use of any structure for the purpose of fighting or baiting any animal is guilty of a felony and upon conviction must be punished by a fine of $5000 or 5 years imprisonment or both. The section also provides for seizure and forfeiture of animals used in fighting operations.
SC - Domestic Violence - Protection from Domestic Abuse Act Code 1976 § 20-4-60 South Carolina now allows a judge to issue a protective order that prohibits the harm or harassment against any pet animal owned, possessed, kept, or held by the petitioner; any family or household member designated in the order; or the respondent if the petitioner has a demonstrated interest in the pet animal.The law also allows the judge to issue a protective order that provides for temporary possession of the personal property, including pet animals, of the parties and order assistance from law enforcement officers in removing personal property of the petitioner if the respondent's eviction has not been ordered.
SC - Lien, boarding - § 29-15-60. Animal boarding facilities; liens upon animals for boarding expenses. Code 1976 § 29-15-60 This South Carolina law states that the owner of an animal boarding facility, at the end of an agreed upon term of boarding, shall have a lien upon any animal which is left for upkeep until the cost has been paid by the owner of the animal. The owner of the animal shall also be responsible for payment of the cost of care for the animal after notice of the lien. If the owner of the animal has not paid the cost after actual notice of the lien within ten days of such notice, the animal boarding facility owner may sell the animal after having advertised the time and place of the sale at least seven days before the sale is to be held.
SC - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal Laws Code 1976 § 31-21-70; Code 1976 § 2-7-35; Code 1976 § 47-3-910 - 990; Code 1976 § 43-33-10 - 70; Code 1976 § 56-5-3200 - 3220; Code 1976 § 43-26-80 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance/service animal laws.
SC - Veterinary - Chapter 69. Veterinarians. Code 1976 § 40-69-5 to 305 These are the state's veterinary practice laws amended in 2006. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
SC - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes Code 1976 § 47-1-10 - 225; Code 1976 § 16-15-120 This South Carolina subsection comprises the state's anti-cruelty laws. The term "animal" under this subchapter includes all living vertebrate creatures except homo sapiens (but see the exclusion section where fowl are specifically excluded). Animal cruelty occurs when a person knowingly or intentionally overloads, overdrives, overworks, ill-treats any animal, deprives any animal of necessary sustenance or shelter, inflicts unnecessary pain or suffering upon any animal, or by omission or commission knowingly or intentionally causes these things to be done. The statute also has a felony provision for the torture, tormenting, needless mutilation, cruel killing, or infliction of excessive or repeated unnecessary pain.
SC - Pet Sales - § 47-13-160. Fitness of registered companion dog or cat for sale; definitions; certifications; remedies. Code 1976 § 47-13-160 This South Carolina statute provides that no pet dealer, pet shop, or pet breeder shall sell a registered companion dog or cat without providing to the purchaser a statement certifying that the dog or cat has received an infectious disease inoculation. If at any time within fourteen days following the sale and delivery of a registered companion dog or cat to a purchaser, a licensed veterinarian certifies the animal to be unfit for purchase due to a noncongenital cause or condition or within six months certifies an animal to be unfit for purchase due to a congenital or hereditary cause or condition, a purchaser has the right to elect one of the following options described in the statute. This section is apparently limited to registered dogs or cats.
SC - Exotic pets - Chapter 2. Large Wild Cats, Non-Native Bears and Great Apes Code 1976 § 47-2-10 to 70 This South Carolina chapter, effective January 1, 2018, makes it unlawful for a person to possess, keep, purchase, have custody or control of, breed, or sell within this State a large wild cat, non-native bear, or great ape, including transactions conducted via the Internet. A person in possession of such animal before January 1, 2018 who is the legal possessor of the animal may keep possession if he or she complies with seven conditions listed under Section 47-2-30. Authorities may confiscate large wild cats, non-native bears, or great apes held in violation of this chapter. Cities or counties may also adopt more restrictive ordinances than this chapter. A person who violates this chapter must be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned for not more than 30 days for a first offense, and must be fined not more than $5,000 or imprisoned for not more than 90 days for a second offense. Exempted entities include certain non-profit animal protection organizations, university research labs holding Class R registration under the AWA, any person who possesses a valid USDA Class A, B, or C license in good standing, and circuses that are incorporated and hold a Class C license under the AWA that are temporarily in this State, among others.
SC - Ecoterrorism - Chapter 21. Farm Animal and Research Facilities Protection Act. Code 1976 § 47-21-10 to 90 The set of law comprises South Carolina's Farm Animal and Research Facilities Protection Act. A person commits an offense if, without the effective consent of the owner, the person exercises control over an animal facility or the property located there, or if that person damages the facility or its property. A person also commits an offense if he or she enters a facility without the effective consent of the owner and remains concealed with the intent to disrupt or damage the enterprise conducted at the animal facility. Violation for disruption or damage to a facility or its property is a misdemeanor with a fine of up to $10,000 and/or 3 years imprisonment. Violation for illegal entry is a misdemeanor with a fine up to $5,000 and/or 1 year imprisonment.

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