Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
IL - Ordinances - 5/24. Powers of municipalities and other political subdivisions to regulate dogs and other animals 510 I.L.C.S. 5/24 This Illinois statute provides that nothing in the Animal Control Act shall be held to limit the power of any municipality to prohibit animals from running at large, nor shall anything in this Act be construed to limit the power of any municipality to further control and regulate dogs, cats or other animals in such municipality or other political subdivision provided that no regulation or ordinance is specific to breed.
IL - Lost Property - Estrays and Lost Property Act 765 I.L.C.S. 1020/0.01 - 36 These Illinois' statutes comprise the state's Estrays and Lost Property Act.
IL - Lein - 40/50. Agisters 770 I.L.C.S. 40/50 Agisters and persons keeping, yarding, feeding or pasturing domestic animals, shall have a lien upon the animals agistered, kept, yarded or fed, for the proper charges due for the agisting, keeping, yarding or feeding thereof.
IL - Insurance - 5/143.10e. Home property insurance; dog breeds 215 I.L.C.S. 5/143.10e This law was amended in 2023 to prohibit homeowner insurance discrimination based on the breed of dog. The law states that, with respect to homeowner's insurance policies and renter's insurance policies issued, renewed, modified, altered, or amended on or after the effective date this act, no insurer shall refuse to issue or renew, cancel, charge or impose an increased premium or rate for a policy or contract, or exclude, limit, restrict, or reduce coverage under a policy or contract based solely upon harboring or owning any dog of a specific breed or mixture of breeds.
IL - Hunting - 5/48-3. Hunter or fisherman interference 720 I.L.C.S. 5/48-3 A person commits hunter or fisherman interference when he or she intentionally or knowingly obstructs or interferes with the lawful taking of wildlife or aquatic life by another person with the specific intent to prevent that lawful taking. This includes things such as blocking or impeding the person hunting, using objects or barriers, using artificial or natural stimuli to hinder the lawful taking, or even using a drone in a way that interferes with another person's lawful taking of wildlife or aquatic life. A first violation is a Class B misdemeanor with enhacements for subsequent offenses.
IL - Hunting - 5/2.33b. Computer-assisted remote hunting; prohibition 520 I.L.C.S. 5/2.33b This Illinois law provides that no person shall operate, provide, sell, use, or offer to operate, provide, sell, or use any computer software or service that allows a person not physically present at the hunt site to remotely control a weapon that could be used to take wildlife by remote operation. This also includes weapons or devices set up to fire through the use of the Internet or through a remote control device.
IL - Humane Slaughter - Humane Slaughter of Livestock Act 510 I.L.C.S. 75/0.01 - 8 This Illinois section comprises the state's humane slaughter laws. It begins with a statement of policy that calls for the humane slaughter of commercial animals. Animals must be slaughtered in a manner that renders them insensible to pain prior to hoisting or shackling. As a result, the use of a manually operated hammer, sledge or pole-ax or shackling as well as the hoisting or hanging any animal while such animal is conscious are prohibited. Any violation of this Act or of the rules and regulations promulgated by the Director is a petty offense.
IL - Horse Meat Act - Chapter 225. Professions and Occupations. 225 ILCS 635/1 - 18 This Act prohibits the slaughter of horses for human consumption as well as importing, exporting, selling, giving, or even possessing horse meat if a person knows or should know that it will be used for human consumption. Violation of this section of the Act is a Class C misdemeanor. The Act does contain several exceptions. Notably, it does not apply to any commonly accepted noncommercial, recreational, or sporting activities.
IL - Farming - The Animal Welfare Regulations, Raising Pigs and Keeping Them for Agricultural Purposes), 2015 Animal Welfare Regulations 2015 Attached are the Animal Welfare Regulations from 2015 on confined pigs, available in both English and Hebrew. These Israeli regulations ban the use of gestation crates without exception (isolation is allowed for up to a week for insemination, but in a compartment wide enough to allow the sow to turn around) and farrowing crates are allowed only up to 2 weeks after the sow gave birth.
IL - Facility dog - 5/106B-10. Conditions for testimony by a victim who is a child or a moderately, 725 I.L.C.S. 5/106B-10 This Illinois law allows a "facility dog" - a dog that is a graduate of an assistance dog organization that is a member of Assistance Dogs International - to be present during the testimony of a victim who is a child or a moderately, severely, or profoundly intellectually disabled person or a person affected by a developmental disability. This occurs in the prosecution of criminal sexual assault, predatory criminal sexual assault of a child, aggravated criminal sexual assault, criminal sexual abuse, or aggravated criminal sexual abuse. When deciding whether to permit the child or person to testify with the assistance of a facility dog, the court shall take into consideration the age of the child or person, the rights of the parties to the litigation, and any other relevant factor that would facilitate the testimony by the child or the person.
IL - Exotic pets - Act 68. Herptiles-Herps Act 510 ILCS 68/1-1 to 510 ILCS 68/110–5 Under the Herptiles-Herps Act reptiles and amphibians are exempt from the definition of “aquatic life” under the Fish and Aquatic Life Code. All rules and enforcement actions under the Illinois Conservation Law and the dangerous animals statutes related to reptiles and amphibians are now covered exclusively by this Act.
IL - Exotic pets - 5/48-10. Dangerous animals 720 I.L.C.S. 5/48-10 This Illinois law states that no person shall have a right of property in, keep, harbor, care for, act as custodian of or maintain in his or her possession any dangerous animal or primate except at a properly maintained zoological park, federally licensed exhibit, circus, college or university, scientific institution, research laboratory, veterinary hospital, hound running area, or animal refuge in an escape-proof enclosure. A "dangerous animal" is defined as a lion, tiger, leopard, ocelot, jaguar, cheetah, margay, mountain lion, lynx, bobcat, jaguarundi, bear, hyena, wolf or coyote.This Section does not prohibit a person who had lawful possession of a primate before January 1, 2011, from continuing to possess that primate if the person registers the animal by providing written notification to the local animal control administrator on or before April 1, 2011. Violation is a Class C misdemeanor.
IL - Equine Liability Act - Equine Activity Liability Act 745 I.L.C.S. 47/1 - 47/999 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or professional, or any other person, is immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, there are exceptions to this rule; a person will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant. In addition, a person will also be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.
IL - Endangered Species - Act 10. Illinois Endangered Species Protection Act 520 I.L.C.S. 10/1 - 11 These Illinois statutes set out the definitions related to endangered species and include prohibitions on the taking, transporting, and buying or selling of listed species, among other things. Permits are issued for the enhancement of the survival of the species and limited permits are issued for incidental takings. Violation of the statute results in a Class A misdemeanor and forfeiture of both the species taken and instrumentalities used in the taking are provided.
IL - Elephant - 5/48-11. Unlawful use of an elephant in a traveling animal act 720 I.L.C.S. 5/48-11 This Illinois law states that a person commits unlawful use of an elephant in a traveling animal act when he or she knowingly allows for the participation of an African elephant (Loxodonta Africana) or Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) protected under the federal Endangered Species Act of 1973 in a traveling animal act. Violation is a Class A misdemeanor. This Section does not apply to an exhibition of elephants at a non-mobile, permanent institution, or other facility.
IL - Education - Act 112. Dissection Alternatives Act 105 ILCS 112/1 - 112/99 This comprises Illinois' Dissection Alternatives Act. The act requires the State Board of Education to make guidelines that give notice to parents and students on which courses ordinarily involve dissection of animals and whether or not alternative projects for learning are available. A school may excuse a student enrolled in a course in which students are ordinarily expected to perform, participate in, or observe dissection who objects for any reason to performing, participating in, or observing that dissection and instead allow the student to complete an alternative project. The act defines "student" as those pupils at a public or private elementary or secondary school in Illinois. No student is to be penalized or discriminated against for refusing to perform, participate in, or observe dissection.
IL - Ecoterrorism - 5/48-2. Animal research and production facilities protection 720 I.L.C.S. 5/48-2 This new law replaces the Illinois' Animal Research and Production Facilities Protection Act, which was repealed in 2013. Under the new law, it is unlawful for any person to release, steal, or injure an animal held at a facility; to damage or vandalize any property; to obtain access to an animal facility by false pretenses for the purpose of performing unauthorized acts; to enter into an animal facility with an intent to destroy, alter, duplicate, or obtain unauthorized possession of records; or to enter or remain on an animal facility with the intent to commit a prohibited act. Violation of any of these acts is a felony, with classification based on the amount of property damage.
IL - Domesticated Wild Animals Act - Chapter 510. Animals. 510 I.L.C.S. 60/0.01 - 60/3 All birds and wild animals in domestication, or kept in enclosures and reduced to possession, are declared to be objects of ownership and absolute title. When fur bearing animals are raised in captivity for breeding, such animals are considered domestic animals. The animals and the products made from them are agricultural products.
IL - Domestic Violence - Article 112A. Domestic Violence 725 ILCS 5/112A-14 This Illinois law allows a court to issue an order of protection if the court finds that petitioner has been abused by a family or household member. It also allows for the protection of animals in domestic violence situations. Under Section (b)(11.5), the court can "[g]rant the petitioner the exclusive care, custody, or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either the petitioner or the respondent or a minor child residing in the residence or household of either the petitioner or the respondent and order the respondent to stay away from the animal and forbid the respondent from taking, transferring, encumbering, concealing, harming, or otherwise disposing of the animal."
IL - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws 510 ILCS 5/1 - 35; 510 ILCS 92/1 - 999; 510 ILCS 72/1 - 180; 55 I.L.C.S. 5/5-1071 - 1071.1; 60 I.L.C.S. 1/30-110; 520 I.L.C.S. 20/15 and 20/19; 520 I.L.C.S. 5/2.34; 65 I.L.C.S. 5/11-20-9 These statutes comprise Illinois' dog laws. Among the provisions include the Animal Control Act, which regulates the licensing and control of dogs, the Diseased Animal Act, and the Humane Euthanasia in Animal Shelters Act.
IL - Dog Fighting - Chapter 720. Criminal Offenses 720 I.L.C.S. 5/48-1 The following statute comprises Illinois' dogfighting law. Under the law, it is a felony to promote or instigate a fight, or to train or sell a dog for dogfighting purposes. Further, no person may solicit a minor to violate this Section. Providing equipment or aiding in providing equipment for a fight is also a felony. Knowingly attending a dogfight is a Class 4 felony for a first violation. A second or subsequent violation of subsection (g) of this Section is a Class 3 felony.
IL - Dog Bite - Chapter 510. Animals 510 ILCS 5/13 This Illinois statute provides the health procedure for dog bites. When a state health administrator receives information that any person has been bitten by an animal, the administrator shall have such dog or other animal confined under the observation of a licensed veterinarian for a period of not less than 10 days. People with knowledge of dog bites are required to inform the administrator or his or her representative promptly. It is unlawful for the owner of the animal to euthanize, sell, give away, or otherwise dispose of any animal known to have bitten a person, until it is released by the administrator.
IL - Divorce - Act 5. Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act 750 I.L.C.S. 5/452; 750 ILCS 5/501 - 503 Effective January 1, 2018, the Illinois Legislature amended several provisions under Act 5, the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act. Under the Joint Simplified Dissolution Procedure, the amendments added the following requirement to the conditions that must be present to do a simplified dissolution: (k) The parties have executed a written agreement allocating ownership of and responsibility for any companion animals owned by the parties. As used in this Section, “companion animal” does not include a service animal as defined in Section 2.01c of the Humane Care for Animals Act." Under Part V, "Property, Support and Attorney Fees," three sections were amended. Section 5/501 deals with temporary relief and amendments in 2018 added subsection (f): "Companion animals. Either party may petition or move for the temporary allocation of sole or joint possession of and responsibility for a companion animal jointly owned by the parties. In issuing an order under this subsection, the court shall take into consideration the well-being of the companion animal." In Section 5/502 on amicable settlement agreements between parties, the following provision was added to subsection (a): "The parties may also enter into an agreement allocating the sole or joint ownership of or responsibility for a companion animal. As used in this Section, “companion animal” does not include a service animal as defined in Section 2.01c of the Humane Care for Animals Act. Any agreement pursuant to this Section must be in writing, except for good cause shown with the approval of the court, before proceeding to an oral prove up." Finally, under § 503 on "Disposition of property and debts," amendments added this subsection: "(n) If the court finds that a companion animal of the parties is a marital asset, it shall allocate the sole or joint ownership of and responsibility for a companion animal of the parties. In issuing an order under this subsection, the court shall take into consideration the well-being of the companion animal. As used in this Section, “companion animal” does not include a service animal as defined in Section 2.01c of the Humane Care for Animals Act."
IL - Disaster - Illinois Emergency Management Agency Act. 3305/4. Definitions. 20 I.L.C.S. 3305/4 The Illinois' Illinois Emergency Management Agency Act defines Emergency Operations Plan as the written plan of the State and political subdivisions describing the organization, mission, and functions of the government and supporting services for responding to and recovering from disasters and shall include plans that take into account the needs of those individuals with household pets and service animals following a major disaster or emergency.
IL - Cruelty, reporting - 5/11.8. Cross-reporting 325 I.L.C.S. 5/11.8 This Illinois law states that Investigation Specialists, Intact Family Specialists, and Placement Specialists employed by the Department of Children and Family Services who reasonably believe that an animal observed by them when in their professional or official capacity is being abused or neglected in violation of the Humane Care for Animals Act must immediately make a written or oral report to the Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare.
IL - Cruelty Generally - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes (Humane Care for Animals Act) 510 I.L.C.S. 70/1 - 18; 720 I.L.C.S. 5/12-35 This comprehensive Humane Care of Animals Act from Illinois gives the requisite anti-cruelty provisions. "Animal" means every living creature, domestic or wild, but does not include man. Notably, the Act includes a provisions for psychological counseling for a person convicted of violating this section. An individual is guilty of a Class B misdemeanor for the first offense and a second or subsequent violation is a Class 4 felony with every day that a violation continues constituting a separate offense. The Act includes special provisions for juveniles and "companion animal hoarders" (510 ILCS 70/2.10). The cruelty provisions are listed at 510 ILCS 70/3.01, 3.02, and 3.03. The statute also prohibits the marketing and distribution of depictions of animal torture or cruelty for entertainment purposes (510 ILCS 70/3.03-1).
IL - Cruelty - Horse Mutilation Act 720 ILCS 5/48-5 This act text prevents the docking of horses' tails. Violation results in a Class A misdemeanor.
IL - Cruelty - CRUELTY TO ANIMALS REGULATIONS (ANIMAL PROTECTION) (GEESE FORCEFEEDING) CRUELTY TO ANIMALS REGULATIONS (ANIMAL PROTECTION) (GEESE FORCEFEEDING),

The purpose of these Regulations is to prevent the suffering of geese while being force-fed and fattened in order to produce goose liver (fois gras), and to halt the further expansion of the goose liver production's sector in Israel.

IL - Cruelty - CRUELTY TO ANIMALS LAW (ANIMAL PROTECTION) CRUELTY TO ANIMALS LAW (ANIMAL PROTECTION), 5754-1994

This law represents Isreal's anti-cruelty law. The law provides that no person shall torture, treat cruelly or in any way abuse any animal. It also states that no person shall incite one animal against another or organise a contest between animals. The cutting into live tissue of an animal for cosmetic purposes is also prohibited.

IL - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws 510 ILCS 70/2.01c, 2.01d, 4.03, 4.04, 7.15; 720 ILCS 5/48-8; 730 I.L.C.S. 5/3-12-16; 740 I.L.C.S. 13/1, 13/5, 13/10; 775 I.L.C.S. 30/1 - 6; 510 ILCS 5/15.1; 105 I.L.C.S. 5/14-6.02; 210 ILCS 125/32; 625 ILCS 60/5, 60/15; 775 ILCS 5/3-104.1 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
IE - Welfare - Animal Health and Welfare Act 2013 Animal Health and Welfare Act 2013 This Ireland act deals with the health and welfare of animals by providing a number of regulations that help to protect animals. The regulations cover areas such as disease control, animal cruelty, animal health levies, and disposal of animals. In addition, the act provides for sanctions that are placed on anyone that is in violation of the act.
IE - Cruelty - Protection of Animals, 1911 Protection of Animals Act, 1911 This Ireland law makes it illegal for a person to cause any animal “unnecessary suffering.” The act outlines all of the ways a person can be guilty of causing an animal harm including: beating, kicking, over-loading, torturing, and poisoning. If a person is found guilty under the act, the court has the power to take ownership of the animal and order the guilty party to pay any damages that resulted from the harm.
IE - Cruelty - Protection of Animals (Amendment) Act, 1965 Protection of Animals (Amendment) Act, 1965 This Ireland law is an amendment to the Animal Protections Act of 1911. It provides for more specific regulations regarding the treatment of animals. This act specifically addresses: care of impounded animals, use of poisonous gas in rabbit holes, restrictions on spring traps, open trapping, injured animals, laying of poisons, issues relating specifically to dogs, use of anesthetics in operations of animals, and the regulation of sale of pet animals.
ID - Wildlife - Chapter 7. Captive Wildlife I.C. § 36-701 to 716 This section comprises Idaho's captive wildlife provisions. Under the law, no person shall engage in any propagation or hold in captivity any species of big game animal found wild in this state, unless the person has been issued a license or permit by the director. All other species of mammals, birds or reptiles that are found in the wild in this state and are not species of special concern or threatened and endangered species, may be held in captivity without permit so long as the possessor retains proof that such wildlife was lawfully obtained. The laws concerning commercial wildlife farms are also included in this section. Additionally, there is also a section on the transition of wolves from federal to state management (36-715).
ID - Veterinary - CHAPTER 21. VETERINARIANS. I.C. § 54-2101 - 2121 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
ID - Slaughter, animal - Chapter 58. Public Health and Safety I.C. § 18-5803 - 5808 These Idaho statutes make certain activities involved with animal slaughter criminal. For example, it is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine to put the carcass of any dead animal into any river, creek, pond or street. It is a misdemeanor to slaughter or sell any animal that has been confined for 20 hours without water or 48 hours without food. The statutes also make it a felony if a mischievous animal is allowed to run at large and the animal kills a person.
ID - Predators - Chapter 11. Protection of Animals and Birds I.C. § 36-1101 to 1120 This Idaho chapter deals with restrictions on the taking of wildlife, protection of wildlife, and control of predators. Migratory birds are protected under the chapter. The chapter also establishes the right of any person to control, trap, or remove any wild animal damaging private property, within limitations set forth. In particular, the chapter states that wolves may be disposed of by livestock or domestic animal owners, their employees, agents and animal damage control personnel when the same are molesting or attacking livestock or domestic animals and it shall not be necessary to obtain any permit from the department. The section also sets up procedures for damage caused by game animals such as deer and elk as well as predators like black bears, grizzly bears, and mountain lions.
ID - Predator - Chapter 58. Protection of Natural Resources (wolf declaration) I.C. § 67-5801 - 5807 The purpose of Chapter 58 is to provide an orderly, comprehensive plan for the protection of the natural resources of the state and for the suppression of dangers or threats. Section 5806 the Idaho legislature finds and declares that the state's citizens, businesses, hunting, tourism and agricultural industries, private property and wildlife, are immediately and continuously threatened and harmed by the sustained presence and growing population of Canadian gray wolves in the state of Idaho. The legislature states that "a disaster emergency is in existence as a result of the introduction of Canadian gray wolves, which have caused and continue to threaten vast devastation of Idaho's social culture, economy and natural resources."
ID - Pet Trusts - CHAPTER 7. TRUST ADMINISTRATION. I.C. § 15-7-601 This Idaho statute represents Idaho's relevant pet trust law. The law, while not termed a pet trust, provides that a person may create a "purpose trust." This trust does not require a beneficiary and may instead just name a person to enforce the trust.
ID - Ordinances - § 50-319. Animals at large--Regulation I.C. § 50-319 This Idaho law gives the authority to the mayor and city council to do things like regulate the running at large of domesticated animals, to impound animals running at large, and to manage pounds for such animals.
ID - Livestock - Chapter 19. Miscellaneous Offenses Relating to Livestock I.C. § 25-1901 to 1910 This Idaho chapter concerns miscellaneous offenses relating to livestock. One law provides that any person other than the owner, his servant or agent who skins or removes from the carcass, the skin, hide, or pelt of any neat cattle or sheep found dead or perished, is guilty of a misdemeanor. Other topics include the slaughter of unbranded livestock, removal of hides from carcasses, altering brands and marks, and stealing the "services" of a bull.
ID - Lien - § 45-805. Liens for services on or caring for property I.C. § 45-805 This Idaho law deals with liens livery or boarding or feed stable proprietors and others pasturing livestock who have a lien. If the liens are not paid within sixty days after the work is done, service rendered, or feed or pasturing supplied, the person in whose favor such special lien is created may proceed to sell the property at a licensed public livestock auction market, or if the lien is on equines, to sell the animals at a sale offered to the public, after giving ten days' notice to the owner or owners of the livestock and the state brand inspector. Requirements for proper notice are provided in the law.
ID - Initiatives - HJR2 (right to hunt) HJR2 (2012) This proposed amendment would provide that the rights to hunt, fish and trap are a valued part of Idaho's heritage and would preserve these rights for the people of Idaho and manage these rights through the laws of the state. This amendment specifies that hunting, fishing and trapping shall be a preferred means of managing wildlife. This amendment does not create a right to trespass or affect rights to divert or appropriate water. This amendment also will not prevent the suspension or revocation of licenses issued by the state for hunting, fishing or trapping. The measure was passed by 73.4% of voters.
ID - Hunting - Chapter 15. Public Safety. I.C. § 36-1510 This section comprises Idaho's hunter harassment law. Under the law, no person shall intentionally interfere with the lawful taking or control of wildlife by another; intentionally harass, bait, drive or disturb any animal for the purpose of disrupting lawful pursuit; or damage or destroy in any way any lawful hunting blind with the intent to interfere. Idaho also expands these activities to include the harassment, intimidation, or threatening of any person who is or was lawfully engaged in the taking of fish or wildlife by such means as personal or written contact, telephone, e-mail, or a website.
ID - Fur - Chapter 30. Fur Farms I.C. § 25-3001 - 3007 In Idaho, fur farming is again defined as an agricultural pursuit, and the animals are considered to be livestock for purposes of Chapter 25. Idaho gives its Animal Industries Division the right to inspect fur farms at any time. Violation of any of the statutory provisions or associated regulations incurs a fine of not less than one hundred dollars ($100) nor more than five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each offense.
ID - Facility Dog - § 19-3023 Child summoned as witness I.C. § 19-3023 This statutes provides that when a child is summoned in a criminal matter, a parent, counselor, friend, or a facility dog may stay in the courtroom during the child's testimony, unless the court finds that the defendant will be unduly prejudiced. When a child is summoned to witness in any non-criminal matter, a facility dog will be allowed to remain in courtroom during the child's testimony.
ID - Exotic - Chapter 39. Importation or Possession of Deleterious Exotic Animals I.C. § 25-3901 - 3905 In Idaho, all apes and other nonhuman primates are classified as “deleterious exotic animals,” which are dangerous to the environment, livestock, agriculture, or wildlife of the state. According to Idaho’s legislature, it is in the public interest to strictly regulate the importation and possession of those animals.
ID - Equine Activity Liability - CHAPTER 18. EQUINE ACTIVITIES IMMUNITY ACT. I.C. § 6-1801 - 1802 This Idaho statute provides that an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional shall not be liable for any injury to or the death of a participant or equine engaged in an equine activity and no participant may maintain an action against an equine activity sponsor or professional. Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "equine," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional. Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.
ID - Endangered Species - Chapter 24. Species Conservation- Chapter 26. Fish and Game I.C. § 36-2401 - 2405, 36–1101 This Idaho law sets out the definitions related to state endangered species laws. It also establishes a delisting advisory team that is responsible for reviewing data related to state species proposed for delisting by the federal government. This team also submits management plans to the state fish and wildlife department.
ID - Ecoterrorism - Chapter 70. Trespass and Malicious Injuries to Property. I.C. § 18-7015, 7037, 7040, 7041, 7042 These laws comprise Idaho's animal enterprise interference/"ecoterrorism" laws. The state has a provision specific to trespass into enclosures for fur-bearing animals such as foxes. Additionally, § 18-7037 prohibits the unauthorized release of an animal, a bird, or an aquatic species which has been lawfully confined for agriculture, science, research, commerce, public propagation, protective custody, or education. This offense is a misdemeanor and the actor is liable for restitution that includes replacement costs, property damage, and even costs of repeating an experiment. Section § 18-7040 defines the crime of interference with agricultural research where a person knowingly damages property, obtains property with the intent of hinder the research; obtains access to the facility by misrepresentation to perform acts to damage or hinder the research; enters the facility with the intent to damage, alter, or duplicate data or records; or the release of an animal or injury to an animal at the facility. Violation is a felony with punishment of up to 20 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $10,000. The state also has a separate section on damage to aquaculture operations.

Pages