Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort ascending Summary
NV - Disaster - Chapter 414. Emergency Management. General Provisions. N. R. S. 414.095 and 414.097 In Nevada, an emergency management plan must address the needs of persons with pets or service animals during and after an emergency or disaster.
NV - Domestic Violence - Chapter 33. Injunctions. Orders for Protection Against Domestic Violence. N. R. S. 33.018, 33.030 In Nevada, a knowing, purposeful or reckless course of conduct intended to harass the other such as injuring or killing an animal, is included in their definition of Domestic Violence. A victim can then get a Protection Order and enjoin the adverse party from physically injuring, threatening to injure or taking possession of any animal that is owned or kept by the applicant or minor child, either directly or through an agent.
NV - Dog Ordinance - 244.359. Ordinance concerning control of animals N. R. S. 244.359 This Nevada statute provides that each board of county commissioners may enact and enforce an ordinance related to dogs including licensing, regulating or prohibiting the running at large and disposal of all kinds of animals, establishing a pound, designating an animal as inherently dangerous and requiring the owner of such an animal to obtain a policy of liability insurance, among other things.
NV - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 202. Crimes Against Public Health and Safety. N. R. S. 202.500 This Nevada statute defines a "dangerous dog," as a dog, that without provocation, on two separate occasions within 18 months, behaved menacingly to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend him or herself against substantial bodily harm, when the dog is either off the premises of its owner or keeper or not confined in a cage or pen. A dog then becomes "vicious" when, without being provoked, it killed or inflicted substantial bodily harm upon a human being. If substantial bodily harm results from an attack by a dog known to be vicious, its owner or keeper is guilty of a category D felony. Under the statute, a dog may not be declared dangerous if it attacks as a defensive act against a person who was committing or attempting to commit a crime or who provoked the dog.
NV - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws N. R. S. 193.021; N. R. S. 202.500; N. R. S. 206.150; N. R. S. 244.359; N. R. S. 269.225; N. R. S. 289.595; N. R. S. 503.631, 636; N. R. S. 568.370; N.R.S. 574.600 - 670; N.R.S. 575.020 These statutes comprise Nevada's dog laws. Among the provisions include a link to proper care requirements for companion animals, animal control ordinance provisions, and the dangerous dog law among others.
NV - Property - Chapter 193. General Provisions. N. R. S. 193.021 Dogs, domestic animals and birds are considered personal property in Nevada.
NV - Trusts - Chapter 163. Trusts. Creation and Validity of Trusts. 163.0075. Validity of trust providing for care of one or mor N. R. S. 163.0075 This Nevada statute allows for a trust created for the care of one or more animals that are alive at the time of the settlor's death (note the statute does not state "domestic" or "pet" animal). Such a trust terminates upon the death of all animals covered by the terms of the trust. It further provides that a settlor's expression of intent must be liberally construed in favor of the creation of such a trust.
NV - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N. R. S. 118.105; 426.097; 426.099; 426.510, 426.515; 426.695; 426.790;426.800; 426.805; 426.810; 426.820; 484B.290; 613.330; 651.075; 704.145; and 706.366 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NV - Housing - 116.318. Right of units’ owners to keep pet N. R. S. 116.318 This Nevada law enacted in 2019 states that the executive board of an association shall not and the governing documents of that association must not prohibit a unit's owner from keeping at least one pet within such physical portion of the common-interest community as that owner has a right to occupy and use exclusively.
NM - Dog Bite - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-6 This short New Mexico statute provides that state health department shall prescribe regulations for the reporting of animal bites, confinement and disposition of rabies-suspect animals, rabies quarantine and the disposition of dogs and cats exposed to rabies, in the interest of public health and safety.
NM - Licenses - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-15.1 This New Mexico statute provides that every municipality and each county may provide by ordinance for the mandatory licensure of dogs over the age of three months. License fees shall be fixed by the responsible municipality or county. Further, pursuant to this statute, every municipality and each county shall provide for the impoundment of rabies-suspect animals.
NM - Ordinances - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-12 This New Mexico statute provides that each municipality and each county shall make provision by ordinance for the seizure and disposition of dogs and cats running at large and not kept or claimed by any person on their premises provided that it does not conflict with state law.
NM - Endangered Species - Chapter 17. Game and Fish and Outdoor Recreation. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 17-2-37 to 17-2-46 These statutes comprise the New Mexico Wildlife Conservation Act. Included in the provisions are definitions related to the statute, legislative policies, and regulations for listing or delisting species. Violation of the Act constitutes a misdemeanor and can incur a penalty from $50 - 1,000 depending on the categorization of the species taken.
NJ - Disaster - Article 6. Emergency Powers of Governor N. J. S. A. App. A:9-43.1 - 2 In New Jersey, the State Office of Emergency Management, and each county and municipality, is directed to adopt a emergency operations plans that include provisions to support the needs of animals and individuals with an animal under their care, including a service animal, in a major disaster or emergency.
NJ - Pet Sales - Pet Purchase Protection Act N. J. S. A. 56:8-92 to 56:8-97 This New Jersey Act protects pet purchasers who receive "defective" companion animals. A purchaser of a defective pet must have his or her pet examined by a veterinarian within 14 days of purchase to receive a refund or exchange. Alternatively, a buyer may retain the pet and be reimbursed for veterinary bills up to two times the cost of the dog or cat.
NJ - Leasing - 56:8-211. Leasing or contracting for the transfer of ownership of a dog or cat prohibited N. J. S. A. 56:8-211 This New Jersey law, enacted in 2019, makes it an unlawful practice to enter into (1) a contract for a cat or dog in which the transfer of ownership of the animal is contingent on the making of payments over a period of time subsequent to the transfer of possession of the animal, unless these payments are on an unsecured loan for the purchase of the animal; or (2) a lease agreement that provides for or offers the option of transferring ownership of a cat or dog at the end of the lease term. A pet dealer who violates this law can be fined up to $10,000 for a first offense and up to $30,000 for second or subsequent offenses.
NJ - Horse Slaughter - 4:22-25.5. Prohibition upon slaughter of horses for human consumption; punishment N. J. S. A. 4:22-25.5 This New Jersey law enacted in 2012 makes it a disorderly persons offense to knowingly slaughter a horse for human consumption. Additionally, it makes the knowing sale or barter of horseflesh for human consumption a disorderly persons offense. Violation incurs a fine of not less than $100 and a term of imprisonment of not less than 30 days.
NJ - Dog Bite - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by N. J. S. A. 4:19-16 This New Jersey statute provides that the owner of any dog that bites a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.
NJ - Humane Societies - 40:48-5.1. Contracts with humane societies where no pound established; advertisement unnecessary N. J. S. A. 40:48-5.1 This law relates to municipalities that do not have public pounds for the keeping of stray dogs or cats.Those municipalities may contract with nonproift humane societies or similar associations that have been operating for one or more years for the keeping and redemption of those animals.
NJ - Domestic Violence - Chapter 25. Domestic Violence N. J. S. A. 2C:25-26, 27,28, 29 On January 17, 2012, Governor Christie signed the Domestic Violence Pet Protection Law . The law authorizes courts to include pets in domestic violence restraining orders. The court is allowed to enter an order " . . . directing the possession of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either party or a minor child residing in the household. Where a person has abused or threatened to abuse such animal, there shall be a presumption that possession of the animal shall be awarded to the non-abusive party." This is listed in N. J. S. A. 2C:25-29(b)(19). Other sections are provided for definitions and background to section 29.
NJ - Lien, horse stable - 2A:44-51. Right of lien; retention of property when amount due unpaid N. J. S. A. 2A:44-51 - 52 This New Jersey law relates to liens on those who keep horses. The law states that every keeper of a livery stable or boarding and exchange stable shall have a lien on all animals left in livery, for board, sale or exchange (and upon all carriages, wagons, sleighs and harness left for storage, sale or exchange) for the amount due for the board and keep of such animal. The keeper has the right, without process of law, to retain the same until the amount of such indebtedness is discharged. Note that the law states “keeper of a livery stable” shall include, but need not be limited to, a proprietor of a stable, a trainer, a veterinarian, a farrier, or any other person who has a financial relationship with the owner of the horse.
NJ - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N. J. S. A. 2A:42-101 to 2A:42-113; 2C:29-3.1; 4:19-1 to 4:19-43; 4:19A-1 - 17; 4:21B-1 - 3; 4:22A-1 to 13; 23:4-25, 26, 46; 26:4-78 - 95; 40:48-1; 54:4-83 These statutes comprise New Jersey's dog laws. Among the provisions include laws regarding domesticated animals in housing projects, rabies control laws, licensing requirements, and dangerous dog laws.
NJ - Wildlife - 23:4-62.2. Bounties or premium for killing prohibition N. J. S. A. 23:4-62.2 This New Jersey statute states that no county or municipality shall hereafter pay any premium or bounty for the killing of any fox or woodchuck.
NJ - Hunting - 23:4-24.5. Computer-assisted remote hunting prohibited; definitions; exception for certain hunters N. J. S. A. 23:4-24.5 This New Jersey law prohibits computer-assisted remote hunting or providing or operating facilities for computer-assisted remote hunting in the State.
NJ - Research - 18A:3B-85. Use of cats or dogs for educational, research, or scientific purposes; assessment N. J. S. A. 18A:3B-85 The “Homes for Animal Heroes Act" adopted in 2020 states that an institution of higher education that uses cats or dogs for educational, research, or scientific purposes, or a research institution that contracts with an institution of higher education for the use of cats or dogs for educational, research, or scientific purposes, shall require the assessment of the health of a cat or dog and determine whether it is suitable for adoption after the completion of any testing or research involving the cat or dog. If the institution determines that the cat or dog is suitable for adoption, the institution shall offer the cat or dog to an animal rescue organization or private individual for adoption.
Model National Animal Welfare Act model law

This model law was drafted to provide a starting point for the drafting of national animal welfare law.  It includes sections related to companion animals, animal cruelty, owner responsibilities, animal experimentation, and food animal provisions, among others.

MS - Dog Theft - Chapter 17. Crimes Against Property Miss. Code. Ann. § 97-17-51 This Mississippi Statute provides that a person commits a felonious offense by stealing, taking and carrying away any dog that is the property of another. If the person who commits the offense is indicted and convicted for stealing the dog, he or she shall be punished by a fine not more than $500, imprisonment not more than 6 months, or both, or imprisoned in the penitentiary not less than 1 year nor more than 2 years.
MS - Facility, courtroom dog - § 99-43-101. Child witness standards of protection Miss. Code Ann. § 99-43-101 Under Mississippi law, in any proceeding in which a child testifies, a child shall have the right to be enforced by the court on its own motion by an attorney in the proceeding to permit a properly trained facility animal or comfort item or both to be present inside the courtroom or hearing room.
MS - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes Miss. Code Ann. § 97-41-1 - 23; Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-59 This section constitutes Mississippi's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions, which were recently amended in 2011. The pertinent anti-cruelty law, Sec. 97-41-1, states that any person who intentionally or with criminal negligence overrides, overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, unjustifiably injures, deprives of necessary sustenance, food, or drink, cruelly beats, or needlessly mutilates any living creature is guilty of a misdemeanor. The cat and dog cruelty provision, 97-41-16, was significantly amended in 2011. This section, known as the "Mississippi Dog and Cat Pet Protection Law of 2011," makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally or with criminal negligence wound, deprive of adequate food, water, or shelter, or carry or confine in a cruel manner, any domesticated cat or dog. Aggravated cruelty occurs when a person with malice intentionally tortures, mutilates, maims, burns, starves or disfigures any domesticated dog or cat.
MS - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 3. Crimes Against the Person. Miss. Code Ann. § 97-3-45 This Mississippi law makes an owner liable for manslaughter if he or she wilfully allows a mischievous animal to go at large, or it goes at large because the owner fails to exercise ordinary care, and the animal, while at large or not confined, kills any human being who took reasonable precautions to avoid the animal.
MS - Theft - § 97-17-61. Taking of animals or vehicles Miss. Code Ann. § 97-17-61 This Mississippi statute provides that any person who takes away any livestock animal, dog, or vehicle without the consent of the owner or his or her agent, where such taking and carrying away does not amount to larceny, shall be fined, imprisoned, or both upon conviction. This statute does not apply to anyone who takes property of another believing, in good faith, that he or she has a right to do so.
MS - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 11. Liability Exemption for Livestock Shows and Equine Activities Miss. Code Ann. § 95-11-1 to 95-11- 7 This Mississippi statute embodies the the intent of the Legislature to encourage equine and livestock activities by limiting the civil liability of those involved in such activities. Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine or livestock activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant. The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.
MS - Trust - § 91-8-408. Trust for care of animal Miss. Code Ann. § 91-8-408 This Mississippi statute allows a trust to be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one (1) animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection Miss. Code Ann. § 75-35-1 to 75-35-327

These Mississippi statutes regulate meat products, animal slaughter, inspection and branding. Animals to be slaughtered must examined and slaughtered humanely, which means being “rendered insensible to pain... before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast or cut.” Meat and meat products must be labeled “Mississippi inspected and passed.” Any violation of the provisions may result in imprisonment and/or a fine.

MS - Horses - Slaughter (Chapter 33. Meat, Meat-Food and Poultry Regulation and Inspection) Miss. Code Ann. § 75-33-3 Construes the phrase "unfit for human consumption" in the very broad Mississippi Meat Inspection Act of 1960 to apply to horse meat and meat-food products.
MS - Veterinarian License - Chapter 39. Veterinarians. Mississippi Veterinary Practice Act. Miss. Code Ann. § 73-39-77 This Mississippi statutes provides the terms under which a veterinarian can lose his or her license to practice veterinary medicine.
MS - Veterinary - Chapter 39. Veterinarians. Miss. Code Ann. § 73-39-51 to 73-39- 95 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
MS - Ecoterrorism - Animal Research or Exhibiting Facilities Protection Act Miss. Code Ann. § 69-29-301 to 69-29-315 This section comprises Mississippi's Animal Research or Exhibiting Facilities Protection Act. The act prohibits a person, without the effective consent of the owner, to acquire or otherwise exercise control over an animal facility with the intent to deprive the owner of the facility, animal or property and to disrupt or damage the enterprise conducted at the animal facility. A person is also prohibited from entering and remaining concealed at a facility with the intent to damage or disrupt the facility. Violation for damaging a facility is a fine of up to $10,000 and/or imprisonment for up to 3 years. Violation for illegal entry with an intent to damage or disrupt the facility results in a fine of up to $5,000 and/or imprisonment up to 1 year.
MS - Exotic pet - Chapter 8. Importation, Sale and Possession of Inherently Dangerous Wild Animals. Miss. Code Ann. § 49-8-1 to 49-8-19 This Mississippi chapter states that it is in the public interest to ensure the public health, safety and welfare by strictly regulating the importation, sale, transfer and possession of those wild animals inherently dangerous to humans. Several species are listed under this section as inherently dangerous to humans, including non-human primates, wolves, bears, hyenas, big cats, and hippopotamus, among others. It is unlawful for a person to import, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal classified inherently dangerous by law or regulation unless that person holds a permit. Those persons who were in possession of such animals on or before May 1, 1997 were able to continue possession provided that they complied with the permit process. Prior to the issuance of a permit, the applicant must have provided proof of liability insurance in the amount of $100,000.00 for each wild animal up to a maximum of $1,000,000.00.
MS - Hunting - § 49-7-68. Computer-assisted remote hunting Miss. Code Ann. § 49-7-68 This Mississippi law makes it a Class I offense a person to engage in computer-assisted remote hunting. It is also unlawful for a person to provide or operate a facility for computer-assisted remote hunting if the game animal or bird being hunted is located in this state.
MS - Hunting - Chapter 7. Hunting and Fishing. In General. Miss. Code Ann. § 49-7-147 This law reflects Mississippi's hunter harassment provision. Under the law, no person shall intentionally interfere with or attempt to prevent the lawful taking of wildlife by another, attempt to disturb wildlife, or attempt to affect wildlife behavior to prevent lawful taking. Further, a person may not harass another person who is engaged in the lawful taking of wildlife or in the preparation for such taking. Engaging in such conduct is a Class II violation.
MS - Endangered Species - Chapter 5. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act Miss. Code Ann. § 49-5-101 to 49-5-119 These Mississippi statutes provide the short title for the Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act, the definitions for the Act, the legislative findings, and the associated regulations of the Act. Violations under the Act may incur up to a $1,000 fine and/or one-year term of imprisonment as well as equipment confiscation.
MS - Hunting, birds - § 49-1-39. Killing animals or birds injurious to agriculture; Miss. Code Ann. § 49-1-39; Miss. Code Ann § 49-5-7 Mississippi amended its laws in 2000 to specifically disallow the killing of any bird protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and was further amended to prohibit the killing or molestation of any wild bird (other than a game bird and some excepted species). While the law was written with an evident bias toward agricultural protection, it does specifically mention the eagle as one of the species protected under federal law.
MS - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Miss. Code Ann. § 43-6-151 - 155; § 43-6-1 - 15; § 97-41-21, 23; § 63-3-1111; § 77-8-31 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
MS - Dog, police - § 41-59-35. Duration of EMT certificate; transport of injured police dog; Miss. Code Ann. § 41-59-35 This law covers certification of emergency medical technicians. In 2018, the law was amended to allow an EMT, EMT-A, EMR, or Paramedic to transport a police dog injured in the line of duty to a veterinary clinic, hospital emergency department or similar facility if there are no persons requiring medical attention or transport at that time. Under this subsection, “police dog” means a dog owned or used by a law enforcement department or agency in the course of the department or agency's work, including a search and rescue dog, service dog, accelerant detection canine, or other dog that is in use by a county, municipal, or state law enforcement agency.
MS - Dog Licenses - Chapter 53. Dogs and Rabies Control. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-53-11 This Mississippi statute provides that it is the lawful duty for any sheriff, conservation officer or peace officer of a county or municipality to kill any dog above the age of three (3) months found running at large on whose neck there is no such collar and tag or who are not inoculated according to state law. No action shall be maintained by the owner for such killing. However, the statute then goes on to say that it is the duty of such officer to first impound the dogs for five days and give a description of the dog to the sheriff.
MS - Leash, Impound - Chapter 19. Health, Safety, and Welfare Miss. Code Ann. § 21-19-9 This Mississippi law grants broad powers to local units of government for animal control, including the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs and penalties provided for the violation of such regulations and the expense of impounding and keeping and selling the same; to regulate and provide for the taxing of owners and harborers of dogs, and to destroy dogs running at large, unless such dogs have proper identification.
MS - Wildlife, Bounty - Chapter 5. Health, Safety and Public Welfare. In General. Miss. Code Ann. § 19-5-51 This Mississippi law provides that any board of supervisors may, by appropriate resolution offer a bounty not to exceed $5.00 for each nutria, beaver or bobcat destroyed, where the board determines that nutria, beaver or bobcats are in such quantities that the preservation of trees is at issue. The The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks will issue a $5 bounty upon the presentation of the tail of any beaver.
MS - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Miss. Code Ann. § 19-5-50; § 19-25-83; § 19-5-3; § 21-19-9; § 21-21-5; § 37-7-342; § 41-53-1 - 13; § 45-3-52; § 49-7-42; § 69-29-2; § 73-39-89; § 95-5-19 - 21

These Mississippi statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions relating to hunting with dogs, local dog ordinances, and liability of owners for damage done by dogs.

MS - Licenses - Chapter 5. Health, Safety and Public Welfare. In General Miss. Code Ann. § 19-5-50 This Mississippi statute provides that the governing authorities of any county bordering on the Gulf of Mexico and having within its boundaries two cities having in excess of forty thousand (40,000) population each and any county with a population in excess of two hundred thousand (200,000) shall have the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs. These governing bodies are also given the authority to regulate and tax dogs generally.

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