Full Statute Name:  New Jersey Statutes Annotated. Title 2a. Administration of Civil and Criminal Justice. Subtitle 6. Specific Civil Actions. Chapter 44. Liens--Bonds of and Money Paid to Contractors on Public Works. Article 7. LiveryStables, and Boarding and Exchange Stable Keepers. 2A:44-51. Right of lien; retention of property when amount due unpaid

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Primary Citation:  N. J. S. A. 2A:44-51 Country of Origin:  United States Last Checked:  January, 2017 Alternate Citation:  NJ ST 2A:44-51 Date Adopted:  1997
Summary:

This New Jersey law relates to liens on those who keep horses. The law states that every keeper of a livery stable or boarding and exchange stable shall have a lien on all animals left in livery, for board, sale or exchange (and upon all carriages, wagons, sleighs and harness left for storage, sale or exchange) for the amount due for the board and keep of such animal. The keeper has the right, without process of law, to retain the same until the amount of such indebtedness is discharged. Note that the law states “keeper of a livery stable” shall include, but need not be limited to, a proprietor of a stable, a trainer, a veterinarian, a farrier, or any other person who has a financial relationship with the owner of the horse.

Statute Text: 


Every keeper of a livery stable or boarding and exchange stable, shall have a lien on all animals left with him in livery, for board, sale or exchange and upon all carriages, wagons, sleighs and harness left with him for storage, sale or exchange for the amount due such proprietor for the board and keep of such animal and also for such storage, and shall have the right, without process of law, to retain the same until the amount of such indebtedness is discharged.

As used in this section, “keeper of a livery stable” shall include, but need not be limited to, a proprietor of a stable, a trainer, a veterinarian, a farrier, or any other person who has a financial relationship with the owner of the horse.

Credits

Amended by L.1997, c. 2, § 1, eff. Jan. 24, 1997.

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