Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
CR - Pets - (Decree 31626 on Pet Ownership) Reglamento para la Reproducción y Tenencia Responsable de Animales de Compañía Decree 31626-S (2004)

This Costa Rica law regulates the responsible ownership of pets (text provided in Spanish).

CR - Veterinary - General Law on the National Service of Animal Health (Law 8495) No. 8495

The law that organizes the Veterinary Official Service of Costa Rica (SENASA), the government institution that is responsible for animal welfare and many other aspects related to animal production and the protection of human and animal health.

CR - Welfare - BIENESTAR DE LOS ANIMALES (Law 7451 on Animal Welfare) Law 7451

(Text in Spanish). The law that regulates animal welfare in Costa Rica; its terms are based on the results of the OIE conference in Australia in 1994.

Criminal Code, Article 291 BIS and 291 TER 1984 Article 291 BIS establishes the penalties for cruelty or mistreatment against animals. Article 291 TER defines animal cruelty and mistreatment.
CT - Assistance Animals - Connecticut Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws C. G. S. A. § 46a-42; § 46a-44; § 46a-64; § 53-330a; § 22-345; § 22-364b; § 14-300; § 17a-22ee

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

CT - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws C. G. S. A. § 53-242 - 254; § 29-108a - 108i; § 53a-73a

This Connecticut section contains the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  Any person who overdrives, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, deprives of necessary sustenance, mutilates or cruelly beats or kills or unjustifiably injures any animal , or fails to give an animal in his or her custody proper care, among other things shall be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than one year or both; a subsequent offense is a Class D felony.  Any person who maliciously and intentionally maims, mutilates, tortures, wounds or kills an animal is also guilty of a Class D felony. Animal fighting is also prohibited under this section as a Class D felony.  Connecticut has a cruelty to poultry law that provides that any crate or other container used for the purpose of transporting, shipping or holding for sale any live poultry must be in a sanitary condition with sufficient ventilation and warmth to prevent unnecessary suffering.  Other provisions include laws against dyeing chicks and rabbits, docking horses' tails, and the use of animals, birds, or reptiles to solicit money.

CT - Cruelty - § 54-86n. Appointment of advocate in proceeding re the welfare or custody of a cat or dog. C.G.S.A. § 54-86n This 2016 law states that, in a cruelty or welfare proceedings, the court may order, upon its own initiative or upon request of a party or counsel for a party, that a separate advocate be appointed to represent the interests of justice. That advocate can monitor the case and supply the court with information about the welfare of the cat or dog. The Department of Agriculture shall maintain a list of attorneys with knowledge of animal issues and the legal system and a list of law schools that have students, or anticipate having students, with an interest in animal issues and the legal system. Such attorneys and law students shall be eligible to serve on a voluntary basis as advocates under this section.
CT - Cruelty, reporting - § 17a-100a. Reporting of neglected or cruelly treated animals. C.G.S.A. § 17a-100a, C.G.S.A. § 17a-100c

These Connecticut statutes require state employees who work with children and families to also report suspected animal harm, neglect, or cruelty. The statutes explain how the reporting should be completed and describes the implementation of training programs for employees to recognize animal abuse. The statutes also discuss the development of an annual report on acutal or suspected instances of animal neglect or cruelty within the state.  

CT - Disaster - Evacuation of Animals During Disasters - Chapter 517. C. G. S. A. § 28-1

In Connecticut, “civil preparedness” includes activities designed to minimize the effects upon the civilian population in the event of major disaster or emergency. Such measures include the nonmilitary evacuation of the civilian population, pets and service animals.

CT - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws C. G. S. A. § 14-226; § 22-327 - 367a; § 26-39 § 26-49; § 26-51; § 26-107

These Connecticut statutes comprise the state's dog law.  Among the provisions include licensing, kennel, and rabies regulations.  With regard to damage by dogs, the law provides a form of strict liability that states if any dog does any damage to either the body or property of any person, the owner or keeper shall be liable for such damage, except when such damage has been occasioned to the body or property of a person who, at the time such damage was sustained, was committing a trespass or other tort, or was teasing, tormenting or abusing such dog.  The law also contains a unique "dogs on highway" provision that provides that any person owning or having the custody of any dog which habitually goes out on any highway and growls, bites, or snaps at, or otherwise annoys, any person or domestic animal lawfully using such highway or chases or interferes with any motor vehicle so using such highway, shall be guilty of a class D misdemeanor.  Further, among the nuisance provisions, the law states that no person shall own or harbor a dog which is a nuisance by reason of vicious disposition or excessive barking or other disturbance. These laws also contain provisions on reporting neglected or cruelly treated animals.  Finally, Connecticut has an anti-ear cropping measures that prohibits cropping by anyone who is not a registered veterinary surgeon, and who performs the operation when the dog is under an anesthetic.

CT - Domestic Violence - § 46b-15. Relief from physical abuse by family C.G.S.A. § 46b-15

Under this Connecticut law, any family or household member who has been subjected to a continuous threat of present physical pain or physical injury by another family may apply to the Superior Court for an order of protection . Under subsection (b), The court may also make orders for the protection of any animal owned or kept by the applicant including, but not limited to, an order enjoining the respondent from injuring or threatening to injure such animal.

CT - Education - § 10-18d. Animal dissection. Students to be excused from participation or observation C. G. S. A. § 10-18d This Connecticut law states that a local or regional school district shall excuse any student from participating in, or observing, the dissection of any animal as part of classroom instruction, provided the parent or guardian of such student has requested, in writing, that such student be excused from such participation or observation. A student excused under this law shall be required to complete an alternate assignment to be determined by the local or regional school district.
CT - Endangered Species - CHAPTER 495. ENDANGERED SPECIES C. G. S. A. § 26-303 - 316

These statutes provide Connecticut's endangered species provisions.  Included are the findings and policy, definitions, acquisition and management of habitat, and penalties for taking of listed species.  The statute also has a provision specific to elephant ivory.

CT - Equine Activity Liability Statute - Chapter 925. Statutory Rights of Action and Defenses C. G. S. A. § 52-557p

This short Connecticut statute limits the liability of equine sponsors by providing that each person engaged in recreational equestrian activities assumes the risk for any injury arising out of the hazards inherent in equestrian sports.  However, if the the injury was proximately caused by the negligence of the person providing the horse or by the failure to guard or warn against a dangerous condition, use, structure or activity, liability if not limited by law. Another section (557s), enacted in 2014, states that, in any civil action brought against the owner or keeper of any horse, pony, donkey or mule to recover damages for any personal injury allegedly caused by such horse, pony, donkey or mule, such horse, pony, donkey or mule shall not be found to belong to a species that possesses a naturally mischievous or vicious propensity. As such, there is no cause of action for strict liability brought against the owner of any horse, pony, donkey or mule to recover damages for any personal injury alleged to be caused by the animal.

CT - Exotic Pets - § 26-40a. Possession of potentially dangerous animal; Chapter 490. Fisheries and Game C. G. S. A. § 26-1, § 26-40a; § 26-54, 55, 61

These Connecticut states reflect the state's laws on the keeping of wild animals. Under § 26-40a, no person shall possess a potentially dangerous animal, which includes wildlife such as the  lion, leopard, cheetah, jaguar, ocelot, jaguarundi cat, puma, lynx, bobcat, wolf, coyote, all species of bears, gorilla, chimpanzee and orangutan. The Department of Environmental Protection shall issue a bill to the owner or person in illegal possession of such potentially dangerous animal for all costs of seizure, care, maintenance, relocation or disposal of such animal. Additionally, any person who violates any provision of this section shall be assessed a civil penalty not to exceed $2000, and is guilty of a class A misdemeanor. Under § 26-55, no person shall import or introduce into the state, possess or let loose, any live fish, wild bird, wild mammal, reptile, amphibian or invertebrate unless such person has obtained a permit. Again, a violator is responsible for expenses from the seizure, maintenance, and relocation of the illegally imported animal. The penalty includes a civil fine up to $1000 and results in a class C misdemeanor.

CT - Feral Cats - § 22-339d. Municipal control of feral cats C.G.S.A. § 22-339d

This Connecticut statute permits municipalities to adopt ordinances requiring registration of feral cat "keepers," defined as anyone who harbors or regularly feeds a feral cat.   If a municipality enacts such an ordinance, the ordinance must require the keeper to sterilize the cat and have it vaccinated against rabies.  The statute also enables municipalities to adopt ordinances holding cat owners and keepers responsible if their cats cause significant property damage or severe health violations.

CT - Fisheries & Wildlife - Chapter 490. Fisheries and Game. § 26-1. Definitions C. G. S. A. § 26-1

Definitions for the Connecticut Statute for Fisheries and Wildlife

CT - Horse - § 22-415. Inhumane transportation of equines. Penalty. Regulations C.G.S.A. § 22-415 This Connecticut law makes it unlawful to carry any equine in an unnecessarily cruel or inhumane manner, or in a way and manner which might endanger the equine or knowingly and wilfully authorizes or permits such equine to be subjected to unnecessary torture, suffering or cruelty of any kind. Violation results in a fine of not less than one hundred dollars or more than five hundred dollars. [Also see the administrative regulations at https://www.animallaw.info/administrative/connecticut-equines-transportation-equines].
CT - Horse Meat - § 21a-22. Sale of equine meat in public eating places C. G. S. A. § 21a-22

This Connecticut law states that a public eating place shall not sell or offer equine meat without without indicating such contents of each item in print. Any person, or the responsible agent of any firm or corporation, who violates any provision of this section shall be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than 1 year or both.

CT - Hunting - Chapter 952. Penal Code: Offenses C. G. S. A. § 53a-183a

This statute comprises Connecticut's hunter harassment law. A person violates this section by intentionally or knowingly doing such things as driving or disturbing wildlife for the purpose of disrupting the lawful taking of wildlife; blocking, impeding, or otherwise harassing a person who is lawfully taking wildlife; using natural or artificial visual, aural, olfactory or physical stimuli to affect wildlife behavior; erecting barriers; interjecting oneself in the line of fire; or remaining on private lands without permission with the intent to violate this section. Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be guilty of a class C misdemeanor.

CT - Hunting - § 26-80b. Sale or use of computer software or service to remotely hunt C. G. S. A. § 26-80b This Connecticut law states that no person shall operate, provide, sell, use or offer to operate, provide, sell or use any computer software or service that allows a person, when not physically present, to remotely control a firearm or weapon to hunt a live animal or bird. Violation is a class A misdemeanor.
CT - Hunting of bald eagle prohibited - Chapter 490. Fisheries and Game C. G. S. A. § 26-93

Connecticut law prohibits the harassment and killing of bald eagles. Violation of the statute can result in a fine of not more than $100 or up to thirty days in jail, or both. .

CT - Leash - Control of dogs in proximity to guide dogs. C. G. S. A. § 22-364b

This Connecticut law provides that the owner or keeper of a dog shall restrain and control such dog on a leash when such dog is not on the property of its owner or keeper and is in proximity to a blind, deaf or mobility impaired person accompanied by his or her guide dog.  Any person who violates the provisions of this section shall have committed an infraction. If an owner or keeper of a dog violates the provisions of this section and, as a result of such violation, such dog attacks and injures the guide dog, such owner or keeper shall be liable for any damage done to such guide dog, including veterinary care, replacement of the dog, and attorney fees.

CT - Lien, care - § 49-70. Lien on animals for their keep. Transfer of abandoned animals C.G.S.A. § 49-70

This Connecticut law provides that when a special agreement has been made between the owner of any animals and a person keeping/taking care of such animals for a price, those animals are subject to a lien in favor of the person keeping the animals. The person keeping those animals may detain the animals until the debt is paid. If the debt is not paid with 30 days after it becomes due, the keeper may sell the animals at public auction after he or she gives written notice to the owner of the time and place at least six days before the sale. Additionally, a commercial boarding kennel or veterinary hospital may transfer abandoned animals to a nonprofit animal rescue or adoption organization. An animal is considered abandoned if the owner or keeper of such animal fails to retrieve the animal within five days of the date on which such owner or keeper was scheduled to retrieve the animal. Written notice notice sent certified, return-receipt requested must first be sent to the owner with a ten-day waiting period before the transfer can occur.

CT - Lost Property - Chapter 859. Lost and Unclaimed Property. C. G. S. A. § 50-1 to 14

This statutory section comprises Connecticut's lost property statutes.

CT - Municipalities - Power to Regulate C. G. S. A. § 7-148 This Connecticut statute allows municipalities to prohibit dogs running at large and to prevet animal cruelty; this statute also prohibts municipalities from adopting breed specific legislation.
CT - Pet Trust - Chapter 802C. Trusts C. G. S. A. § 45a-489a

Connecticut enacted its "pet trust" law in 2009. Under the law, a testamentary or inter vivos trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal or animals alive during the settlor's or testator's lifetime. The trust terminates when the last surviving animal named in the trust dies. The trust must designate a "trust protector" who acts on behalf of the animals named in the trust.

CT - Racing - Chapter 226. Gaming Policy, Regulation and Revenue CT ST §§ 12-557-12-586 A person or business organization must have a license in order to conduct a races. The Commissioner of Consumer Protection is the one who grants the licenses. Each town must hold an election approving racing and pari-mutuel wagering in order for a license to be issued. The Commissioner may order random urine testing of race dogs. The Commissioner is also allowed to conduct investigations and hearings in order to carry out the provisions of this statute and is responsible for adopting regulations.
CT - Reindeer - 26-57a. Regulations for the establishment of in-state captive herds of cervids. C.G.S.A. § 26-57a This Connecticut law relates to the regulation of in-state captive herds of cervids, including reindeer. Under the law, not later than November 1, 2012, the Commissioner of Agriculture shall implement a pilot program for the issuance of two permits that allow not more than two Connecticut businesses to maintain not more than five reindeer each.
CT - Research animals - § 10a-150e. Offering for adoption of cat or dog used for conducting research or testing C.G.S.A. § 10a-150e

This Connecticut law (effective 2016) states that an institute of higher education must offer for adoption by an animal adoption or animal rescue organization any cat or dog that that was subject to research or testing after the completion of any such research or testing and the dog or cat is no longer needed.

CT - Spay and Neuter - Chapter 436A. Animal Population Control C. G. S. A. § 22-380a to 380m

This set of Connecticut laws provides the state's dog and cat sterilization laws. Under the section, no pound is allowed to sell or give away any unspayed or unneutered dog or cat to any person unless such pound receives $45 from the person buying or adopting such dog or cat. These funds are paid quarterly by the municipality into the animal population control account established under section 22-380g. At the time of receipt of such payment, the pound shall provide a voucher, for the purpose of sterilization and vaccination benefits to the person buying or adopting such dog or cat. The chapter also provides the procedure for a veterinarian to participate in the program and the method by which he or she would be paid. Further, the law states that a town clerk may collect an additional $6 for each license issued pursuant to section 22-338 for an unspayed or unneutered dog.

CT - Transport, poultry - § 53-249. Cruelty to poultry C. G. S. A. § 53-249

This statute makes it illegal to transport poultry in any manner that is not sanitary, warm, and ventilated. Poultry must receive "reasonable care" to "prevent unnecessary suffering." Violation of this provision is a class D misdemeanor

CT - Vehicle - Title 14. Motor Vehicles. Use of the Highway by Vehicles. Gasoline C.G.S.A. § 14-226 Any person who knowingly operates a motor vehicle and causes injury or death to a dog shall stop and render assistance and shall immediately report such injury or death to the dog's owner or the owner's representative. If unable to ascertain and locate such owner or representative, the injury or death shall be reported to a police officer. Violation of any provision of this section shall be an infraction.
CT - Vehicle - § 14-272b. Transport of dogs in pick-up trucks. Restrictions C. G. S. A. § 14-272b

This Connecticut law prohibits any person from transporting a dog in the open bed of a pick-up truck unless the dog is secured in a cage or other container to prevent it from jumping out of the truck.

CT - Vehicle - § 52-557u. Entering the passenger motor vehicle of another to remove child or animal from vehicle C. G. S. A. § 52-557u This Connecticut law, effective in 2018, gives an affirmative defense to civil or criminal penalties for any person who enters a passenger motor vehicle of another, including entry by force, to remove a child or animal from the passenger motor vehicle provided certain criteria are met. The person must have a reasonable belief that such entry is necessary to remove the child or animal from imminent danger of serious bodily harm and use no more force than necessary under the circumstances. Additionally, the person must report the entry to law enforcement/public safety within a reasonable period of time after entry and must also take reasonable steps to ensure the health and safety of the child or animal after removing from the vehicle.
CT - Veterinary - Chapter 384. Veterinary Medicine C. G. S. A. § 20-196 - 206

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

CUIDADO DE LOS ANIMALES 207 Animal Protection Law

New comprehensive Animal Welfare Law for Spain - in spanish only.

DC - Animal Control - Subchapter III. Release of Animals. DC CODE § 8-1831.01

This D.C. law states that no animal shall be released from custody of animal protection except for the purposes of adoption, redemption by the owner of the animal, or other suitable placement in the best interest of the animal. No animals shall be knowingly released from any entity charged with animal protection for the purposes of research, experimentation, testing, or medical instruction or demonstration. Violation is a misdemeanor.

DC - Assistance Animals - Chapter 20A. Pet Ownership Restriction in Assisted Housing. DC Code § 8-2031 - § 8-2035; DC CODE § 7-1002, 1006, 1009; DC CODE § 8-1804

The owner or operator of locally assisted housing accommodations for elderly or disabled people may not prevent a tenant from keeping common household pets. However, an owner or operator may require the removal of pets whose conduct or condition constitutes a threat or nuisance to the health or safety of the other occupants. A violation is a civil infraction that may result in a fine of up to $300.

DC - Breeder - Subchapter II. Commercial Licensing Requirement. DC CODE § 8-1821.01 - .02

These D.C. laws require that the Mayor establish licensure requirements for commercial animal breeders in the District of Columbia. The rules must contain requirements as to licensing fees, standards of care, and facility inspection. For the purposes of this section, the term “commercial animal breeder” means any person, firm, organization, or corporation engaged in the operation of breeding and raising more than 25 animals per year for sale or in return for consideration.

DC - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes DC CODE § 22-1001 - 1015

This D.C. statutory section comprises the anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  Whoever knowingly overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, cruelly chains, cruelly beats or mutilates, any animal, or knowingly causes such acts, or one who unnecessarily fails to provide proper food, drink, air, light, space, veterinary care, shelter, or protection from the weather, faces imprisonment up to180 days, or a fine of $250, or both.  Actions that result in serious bodily injury or death to the animal result in felony prosecution with imprisonment not exceeding 5 years or a fine of $25,000, or both.  "Animal" is defined by statute as all living and sentient creatures (human beings excepted).  This section also prohibits animal fighting as either a felony (i.e., wagering or conducting the fight) or a misdemeanor (knowingly being present).

DC - Cruelty - Subchapter V. Classroom Animals. DC CODE § 8-1851.01 to .02

These DC statutes allow animals of appropriate size and temperament be kept in classrooms for instructional purposes. The animals must be provided with sufficient food and water, and be cared for in a safe and humane manner. If the animals are no longer needed, they should be adopted out or given to a local humane organization for adoption.

DC - Cruelty, reporting - § 22-1002.01. Reporting requirements. DC ST § 22-1002.01

This District of Columbia statute requires that any law enforcement or child protective services employee who knows or has reason to suspect than an animal is experiencing cruelty, abandonment, or neglect shall provide a report of the abuse within the speciified time. The statute also states that any employee who observes an animal at the home of a person reasonably suspected of child, adult, or animal abuse should report it. The statute also specifies what information the report must include for completion.

DC - Disaster - Subchapter VI. Animal Emergency Preparedness. DC CODE § 8-1861.01

This DC law provides that the Mayor must establish an emergency preparedness plan for the protection, sheltering, and evacuation of domestic animals during and following a major disaster or emergency within 90 days of December 5, 2008.

DC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws and Dangerous Dog Provision DC CODE § 8-1801 - 1814; § 8-1821.01- .02; § 8-1831.01; 8-1841.01 - .09; 8-1901 - 1908

These District of Columbia statutes make up the dog laws for the District.  Included among the provisions are definitions, animal control and at large provisions, and vaccinations/licensing regulations.  With regard to dangerous dogs, the term "dangerous animal" means an animal that because of specific training or demonstrated behavior threatens the health or safety of the public.  The Mayor may impound any animal at large or any dangerous animal.  If a dog injures a person while at large, lack of knowledge of the dog's vicious propensity standing alone shall not absolve the owner from a finding of negligence.

DC - Dogs - § 22-1311. Allowing dogs to go at large. DC ST § 22-1311

The following District of Columbia statute prohibits dogs that the owner knows to be fierce or dangerous, to the danger or annoyance of the inhabitants, from running at large; it also prohibits female dogs in heat to run at large.

DC - Domestic Violence - Chapter 10. Proceedings Regarding Intrafamily Offenses. DC CODE § 16-1005

This D.C. law provides that if, after a hearing, the judicial officer finds that there is good cause to believe the respondent has committed or threatened to commit a criminal offense against the petitioner or against petitioner's animal or an animal in petitioner's household, the judicial officer may issue a protection order that directs the care, custody, or control of a domestic animal that belongs to petitioner or respondent or lives in his or her household.

DC - Exotic Pets - § 8-1808. Prohibited conduct. DC CODE § 8-1808 This DC law outlines things an owner or custodian is prohibited from doing with regard to his or her animal. Among them is that an owner or custodian shall not allow his or her animal to go at large. An owner or custodian shall not leave his or her animal outdoors without human accompaniment or adequate shelter for more than 15 minutes during periods of extreme weather, unless the age, condition, and type of each animal allows the animal to withstand extreme weather (excluding cats). The law also states that a person shall not separate a puppy or a kitten from its mother until the puppy or kitten is at least 6 weeks of age. Certain animals are prohibited from being possessed or sold in the District, which are outlined in subsection (j).
DC - Horses - Chapter 20. Horse-Drawn Carriages. DC CODE § 8-2001 - 2013

This DC regulation makes it unlawful to operate a horse-drawn carriage trade without a license and an ID card. The regulations forbid certain types of bits and require that each horse wear a diaper. Horses may not be worked or driven for more than 8 hours a day. Horses must be rested, provided with food and water. A violation of the regulations may result in a fine of $300 (1st offense). A serious intentional injury to the horse by neglect or inhumane treatment shall be fined up to $2,500.

DC - Impoundment - § 8-1805. Impoundment DC CODE § 8-1805 Under this law, the Mayor shall make a prompt and reasonable attempt to locate and notify the owner of the impounded animal, including scanning the animal for a microchip. The Mayor shall deem abandoned any animal impounded and not redeemed by its owner within 7 days of impoundment if such animal is wearing identification. Any animal impounded not wearing identification shall be deemed abandoned if not redeemed by its owner within 5 days of impoundment. An animal deemed abandoned shall become the property of the District of Columbia and may be adopted or disposed of in a humane manner.

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