Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
DC - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes DC CODE § 22-1001 - 1015

This D.C. statutory section comprises the anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  Whoever knowingly overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, cruelly chains, cruelly beats or mutilates, any animal, or knowingly causes such acts, or one who unnecessarily fails to provide proper food, drink, air, light, space, veterinary care, shelter, or protection from the weather, faces imprisonment up to180 days, or a fine of $250, or both.  Actions that result in serious bodily injury or death to the animal result in felony prosecution with imprisonment not exceeding 5 years or a fine of $25,000, or both.  "Animal" is defined by statute as all living and sentient creatures (human beings excepted).  This section also prohibits animal fighting as either a felony (i.e., wagering or conducting the fight) or a misdemeanor (knowingly being present).

DC - Cruelty - Subchapter V. Classroom Animals. DC CODE § 8-1851.01 to .02

These DC statutes allow animals of appropriate size and temperament be kept in classrooms for instructional purposes. The animals must be provided with sufficient food and water, and be cared for in a safe and humane manner. If the animals are no longer needed, they should be adopted out or given to a local humane organization for adoption.

DC - Cruelty, reporting - § 22-1002.01. Reporting requirements. DC ST § 22-1002.01

This District of Columbia statute requires that any law enforcement or child protective services employee who knows or has reason to suspect than an animal is experiencing cruelty, abandonment, or neglect shall provide a report of the abuse within the speciified time. The statute also states that any employee who observes an animal at the home of a person reasonably suspected of child, adult, or animal abuse should report it. The statute also specifies what information the report must include for completion.

DC - Disaster - Subchapter VI. Animal Emergency Preparedness. DC CODE § 8-1861.01

This DC law provides that the Mayor must establish an emergency preparedness plan for the protection, sheltering, and evacuation of domestic animals during and following a major disaster or emergency within 90 days of December 5, 2008.

DC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws and Dangerous Dog Provision DC CODE § 8-1801 - 1813; § 8-1821.01- .02; § 8-1831.01; 8-1841.01 - .09; 8-1901 - 1908

These District of Columbia statutes make up the dog laws for the District.  Included among the provisions are definitions, animal control and at large provisions, and vaccinations/licensing regulations.  With regard to dangerous dogs, the term "dangerous animal" means an animal that because of specific training or demonstrated behavior threatens the health or safety of the public.  The Mayor may impound any animal at large or any dangerous animal.  If a dog injures a person while at large, lack of knowledge of the dog's vicious propensity standing alone shall not absolve the owner from a finding of negligence.

DC - Dogs - § 22-1311. Allowing dogs to go at large. DC ST § 22-1311

The following District of Columbia statute prohibits dogs that the owner knows to be fierce or dangerous, to the danger or annoyance of the inhabitants, from running at large; it also prohibits female dogs in heat to run at large.

DC - Domestic Violence - Chapter 10. Proceedings Regarding Intrafamily Offenses. DC CODE § 16-1005

This D.C. law provides that if, after a hearing, the judicial officer finds that there is good cause to believe the respondent has committed or threatened to commit a criminal offense against the petitioner or against petitioner's animal or an animal in petitioner's household, the judicial officer may issue a protection order that directs the care, custody, or control of a domestic animal that belongs to petitioner or respondent or lives in his or her household.

DC - Exotic Pets - § 8-1808. Prohibited conduct. DC CODE § 8-1808

Among other things covered under the law, this D.C. law prohibits the importation into the District, possession, display, offering for sale, trading, bartering, exchanging, or adopting, or giving as a household pet any living member of the animal kingdom including those born or raised in captivity, except the following: domestic dogs (excluding hybrids with wolves, coyotes, or jackals), domestic cats (excluding hybrids with ocelots or margays), domesticated rodents and rabbits, captive-bred species of common cage birds, nonpoisonous snakes, fish, and turtles, traditionally kept in the home for pleasure rather than for commercial purposes, and racing pigeons (when kept in compliance with permit requirements).

DC - Horses - Chapter 20. Horse-Drawn Carriages. DC CODE § 8-2001 - 2013

This DC regulation makes it unlawful to operate a horse-drawn carriage trade without a license and an ID card. The regulations forbid certain types of bits and require that each horse wear a diaper. Horses may not be worked or driven for more than 8 hours a day. Horses must be rested, provided with food and water. A violation of the regulations may result in a fine of $300 (1st offense). A serious intentional injury to the horse by neglect or inhumane treatment shall be fined up to $2,500.

DC - Impoundment - § 8-1805. Impoundment DC CODE § 8-1805

This D.C. statute provides that the Mayor may impound any dangerous or at large animal.  Upon impounding an animal, the Mayor shall make a prompt and reasonable attempt to locate and notify the owner of the impounded animal.  An impounded animal wearing tags shall be kept for 7 days while an animal not wearing tags may be adopted out or disposed of in 5 days.

DC - Municipalities - § 1-303.41. Regulations for the keeping, leashing, and running at large of dogs. DC ST § 1-303.41

The following District of Columbia statute allows the council to make and the mayor to enforce regulations regarding leashing dogs in DC.

DC - Trust for care of animal - Chapter 13. Uniform Trust Code. DC CODE § 19-1304.08

This statute represents the District of Columbia's pet trust law.  The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

DC - Wildlife Control - Chapter 22 Wildlife Protection DC CODE § 8-2201 - 2212

The following D.C. statutes provide the legal requirements for wildlife control service providers, which are defined as operators of businesses which involve the charging of a fee for services in wildlife control. Specifically, these statutes provide provisions about capturing target animals and non-target animals, as well as indicating how often a wildlife control service providers must check their traps.

DE - Assistance Animal - Delaware's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws 16 Del.C. § 3042F; 16 Del.C. § 3056F; 16 Del.C. § 9501 - 9506; 21 Del.C. § 4144; 6 Del.C. § 4501 - 4516; 31 Del.C. § 2117

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

DE - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes 11 Del.C. § 1325 - 1327;16 Del.C. § 3001F - 3008F; 11 Del.C. § 775

These Delaware sections comprise the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  Delaware's anti-cruelty section provides that cruelty to animals is when a person intentionally or recklessly subjects any animal (excluding fish, crustacea or molluska) to cruel mistreatment, cruel neglect, or kills or injures any animal belonging to another person.  Actively engaging in animal fighting activities is a class F felony while being a spectator at a fight is a class A misdemeanor.

DE - Dangerous - Delaware Dangerous Dog Laws 16 Del.C. §§ 3071F to 3081F

These Delaware statutes comprise the state's dangerous dog laws.  Among the provisions includes the mandatory seizure of dogs who have chased or pursued persons on bicycles twice in a twelve-month period or those that have killed or inflicted serious injury on people or other domestic animals.  However, no dog shall be considered dangerous or potentially dangerous if a person was, at the time the injury was sustained, committing criminal trespass or other tort upon premises occupied by the owner of the dog, or was teasing, tormenting, abusing or assaulting the dog, or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.  An owner who violates the provisions regarding ownership of dangerous dogs faces graduated fines based on the conduct at issue.

DE - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws 16 Del.C. § 3041F - 3059F; 16 Del.C. § 3071F - 3081F; 3 Del.C. § 8201 - 8213; 16 Del.C. §§ 3010F - 3021F; 6 Del.C. § 4001 - 4011; 7 Del.C. § 1701 - 1740

These statutes comprise Delaware's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning hunting field trials, and the dangerous dog subchapter.

DE - Endangered Species - CHAPTER 6. ENDANGERED SPECIES 7 Del.C. § 601 - 605

Delaware prohibits the importation, transportation, possession, or sale of any part, hide or an endangered species of fish or wildlife. Delaware also prohibits the intent to import, transport, or sell any part or hide of an endangered species. The only lawful way to take an endangered species is by a license or permit from the Division of Fish and Wildlife and violation of this statute is a class A environmental misdemeanor.

DE - Equine Activity Liability - § 8140. CHAPTER 81. PERSONAL ACTIONS. 10 Del.C. § 8140

This Delaware statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities.  Liability is not limited, however, when the equine professional knowingly used faulty tack, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage in the activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a dangerous latent condition which was known, commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant, or intentionally injures the participant.  Equine professionals and sponsors are also required to post warning signs alerting the participants to the limitation of liability by law.

DE - Exotic Pets - CHAPTER 72. POSSESSION OF MAMMALS OR REPTILES EXOTIC TO DELAWARE 3 Del.C. § 7201 - 7203

This Delaware law requires a permit to possess, sell, or import any non-native wild animal. No such permits will be granted for non-native venomous snakes.

DE - Fur - Chapter 5. Specific Offenses 11 Del.C. § 1325A

In Delaware, a person is guilty of the unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 2nd degree if the person knowingly or recklessly sells, barters or offers for sale or barter, the fur or hair of a domestic dog or cat or any product made in whole or in part from the fur or hair of a domestic dog or cat. The unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 2nd degree is a class B misdemeanor. A person is guilty of the unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 1st degree if the person knowingly or recklessly sells, barters or offers for sale or barter, the flesh of a domestic dog or cat or any product made in whole or in part from the flesh of a domestic dog or cat. The unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the first degree is a class A misdemeanor.

DE - Hunting - Chapter 7. Regulations and Prohibitions Concerning Game and Fish. 7 Del.C. § 704

This Delaware statute provides that no person shall make use of any pitfall, deadfall, scaffold, cage, snare, trap, net, pen, baited hook, lure, urine or baited field or any other similar device for the purpose of injuring, capturing or killing birds or animals protected by the laws of this State, except as otherwise specified.  It further states that no person shall make use of any drug, poison, chemical or explosive for the purpose of injuring, capturing or killing birds or animals protected by the laws of this State.  Use of such devices and contrivances, when found unlawfully set or placed, are subject to confiscation.

DE - Hunting - Chapter 7. Regulations and Prohibitions Concerning Game and Fish. Subchapter I. General Provisions. § 724. Wilful 7 Del.C. § 724

This Delaware law reflects the state's hunter harassment provision. Under the law, no person shall wilfully obstruct or impede the participation of any individual in the lawful taking of fish, crabs, oysters, clams or frogs; the lawful hunting of game birds or animals; or the lawful trapping of any game animals. Violation is a class B environmental misdemeanor. Incidental interference is not unlawful.

DE - Hunting - § 739. Prohibitions respecting bald eagles; disturbing, damaging or destroying nests; eggs; penalties 7 Del.C. § 739

Delaware law makes it a Class A environmental misdemeanor to disturb or damage the nest or eggs of a bald eagle or to kill or possess a bald eagle. It is also prohibited to barter and trade in bald eagles or their parts.

DE - Hunting, Internet - § 704(h). Prohibited hunting and trapping devices and methods; confiscation of devices; primitive weapon season 7 Del.C. § 704(h)

Section (h) of this Delaware law on prohibited hunting methods prohibits "Internet hunting." Under the law, no person shall operate, provide, sell, use, or offer to operate, provide, sell, or use any computer software or service that allows a person not physically present at a hunt site to remotely control a weapon that could be used to take a live animal or bird by remote operation, including, but not limited to, weapons or devices set up to fire through the use of the Internet or through a remote control device.

DE - Ordinances - Local ordinances (dogs) 7 Del.C. § 1740 - § 1740. Repealed by 77 Laws 2010, ch. 428, § 5, eff. July 1, 2010

(Repealed). This Delaware statutes provides that nothing shall prevent a local municipality from enacting measures or a program for the control of dangerous or potentially dangerous dogs.   

DE - Pet Sales - CHAPTER 40. PET WARRANTIES 6 Del.C. § 4001 - 4011

This Delaware statutory section comprises the state's "pet warranty" laws.  Purchasers receive a statement of the dog's breed and any registration information when buying pets from a retail pet store under the law.  Sellers are required to disclose any known disease or illness at the time of sale.  Further, sellers must provide the following written statement when selling a registered pet:  "A pedigree or a registration does not assure proper breeding condition, health, quality or claims to lineage."  Buyers may receive a refund or replacement, or have veterinary expenses reimbursed by a seller where a dog becomes ill or dies within 20 days of purchase (or within two years for a congenital disorder).

DE - Property - § 910. Dogs deemed personal property; theft; penalty. 9 Del.C. § 910 - § 910. Redesignated 16 Del.C. § 3050F by 80 Laws 2016, ch. 248, § 5, eff. May 25, 2016

Dogs are considered personal property in Delaware.

DE - Rabies - Subchapter I. Rabies Control in Animal and Human Populations 3 Del.C. § 8201 - 8213

The purpose of this chapter is to control and suppress the spread of rabies among the domestic and wild animal populations of Delaware. Any person owning a dog 6 months of age or older in this State shall have that dog vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a cat 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the cat vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a ferret 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the ferret vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian.

DE - Spay, Neuter and Feral Cat - Subchapter II. Animal Population Control Program and Spay/Neuter Fund 16 Del.C. § 3010F - 3021F

This chapter represents Delaware's Animal Population Control Program. The section beings with findings from a 2002 study of how many dogs and cats were reclaimed, adopted out, or euthanized. It also has a definitional section that includes a definition for "feral cat." The chapter also describes its funding base and what parties are qualified to receive assistance under the Spay/Neuter Fund. Effective on June 29, 2006, it became mandatory for all cats and/or dogs of reproductive age to be spayed or neutered and inoculated for rabies prior to adoption from any private animal rescue groups and animal shelters.

DE - Tether, dog - Chapter 9. Dogs. 16 Del.C. § 3044F (§§ 901 to 919. Redesignated 16 Del.C. §§ 3041F to 3058F by 80 Laws 2016, ch. 248, § 5, eff. May 25, 2016)

This Delaware statute addresses the requirements for indoor and outdoor facilities housing dogs. It includes storage, drainage, waste disposal, ventilation, lighting, shelter, height, and surface requirements. Food, water, and use of tethers are also addressed.

DE - Trust for care of an animal - Chapter 35. Trusts 12 Del.C. § 3555

Delaware enacted its pet trust law in 2006. A trust for the care of one or more specific animals living at the settlor's death is valid. The trust terminates upon the death of all animals living at the settlor's death and covered by the terms of the trust.

DE - Veterinary - Chapter 33. Veterinarians. 24 Del.C. § 3300 - 3323

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

DE - Wildlife - Chapter 1. Protected Wildlife 7 Del.C. § 101 - 204

These statutes comprise Delaware's protected wildlife provisions. The section outlines the powers and duties of the Department of Fish and Wildlife as well as how funds derived from fishing and hunting licenses may be used. The code also explains the procedure private parties may take when protected wildlife injures crops.

Eastern Band Cherokee - Animal Control - Sec. 19.1, Animal Control Department Eastern Band Cherokee, Sec. 19-19.1

This section of the Eastern Band Cherokee Code describes the purpose of the Tribe's Animal Control Department. The Eastern Band Cherokee Animal Control Code includes Sections 19.1 through 19.7. Each section addresses a different topic within the Tribe's animal control, ranging from administrative purposes to restrictions and regulations.

Eastern Band of Cherokee - Natural resources - Sec. 14-10.10- Cutting timber, removing rock, trapping animals The Cherokee Code. Part II. Section 14. Article III. Sec. 14-10.10

This statute is intended to preserve natural resources and protect wild animals from any trapping conducted without the knowledge of a property owner or the Tribe. The language provides for both land owner through a tribal assignment or lease, as well as lands that are reserved and used exclusively by the Tribe. The language also restricts any person, firm, or corporation from engaging in this conduct without consent and knowledge from the land owner and/or the Tribe.

EG - Animal Development - Chapter 1 on Animal Development and Protection Subchapter II, arts. 108, 109, 117, 118, 119

This chapter of laws from Egypt contains five articles that concern the treatment of animals. Among the provisions is an article that allows the Minister of Agriculture to regulate the import and export of live animals and birds. Article 119 states: "It is forbidden to exercise cruelty to animals. The Minister of Agriculture shall, by decree, specify the cases to which this ban shall apply."

EU - Egg Labeling - Egg Labeling Directive Number 1028 - Council Regulation (EC) No 1028/2006 (EC) No 1028/2006

In June of 2006, the Commission passed a broad regulation on egg labeling—Number 1028—that served mainly to set out labeling requirements distinguishing between Class A eggs (eggs for direct human consumption) and Class B eggs (other eggs). It paved the way for more detailed egg labeling legislation, such as Regulation 557 of 2007, that had a more direct impact on hen welfare.

EU - Farming - 78/923/EEC: Council Decision of 19 June 1978 concerning the conclusion of the European Convention for the protect 78/923/EEC

This EU council decision approves the European Convention for the protection of animals kept for farming purposes on behalf of the European Economic Community. It has the aim of protecting animals kept for farming purposes, particularly in modem intensive production systems.

EU - Farming - Commission Directive 2002/4/EC on the registration of establishments keeping laying hens Commission Directive 2002/4/EC

This EU commission directive concerns Council Directive 1999/74/EC on the registration of establishments keeping laying hens. It mandates that Member States establish a registration system for egg producers covered by Directive 199/74/EC.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 1999/74/EC laying down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens Council Directive 1999/74/EC

The Directive lays down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens. It does not apply to establishments with fewer than 350 laying hens or establishments rearing breeding laying hens. Such establishments are, however, subject to the requirements of Directive 98/58/EC.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 1999/74/EC of 19 July 1999 laying down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens Council Directive 1999/74/EC

This EU council directive lays down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens. In particular, it eliminates battery cages in the EU by 2012 for operations that meet the criteria (establishments with more than 350 laying hens) and creates a registration and reporting system for egg producers.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 2007/43/EC laying down minimum rules for the protection of chickens kept for meat production 2007/43/EC

Community measures regulate the management of holdings that rear chickens for meat production in order to improve animal welfare, particularly for chickens kept on intensive farms.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 2008/119/EC (Calves) 2008/119/EC

Even before passage of this important new directive setting down minimum standards for the protection of calves, the use of veal crates for rearing calves had already been illegal in the EU (since 2006). The new directive, however, passed on December 18, 2008, fleshed out older one, establishing new welfare minimums under which veal could be raised. According to the new directive, veal calves may, when very young, be kept in individual pens, but must be able to turn around and to see and touch other calves through perforated walls. Once they are more than eight weeks old, veal calves must be reared in groups. To guard against the nutrient-deficient diet veal calves have long been fed on factory farms—and continue to be fed on farms in the United States—European calves must, at least twice a day, be fed a diet that meets basic health requirements to ensure their bodies develop normally.

EU - Farming - COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 93/119/EC on the protection of animals at the COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 93/119/EC

This directive reflects the EU's concern for a need to establish common minimum standards for the protection of animals at the time of slaughter or killing in order to ensure rational development of production and to facilitate the completion of the internal market in animals and animal products. The directive also states that at the time of slaughter or killing animals should be spared any avoidable pain or suffering.

EU - Farming - Council Directive concerning the protection of animals kept for farming purposes 98/58/EC; Official Journal L 221 , 08/08/1998 P. 0023 - 0027

This Directive applies to animals (including fish, reptiles and amphibians) reared or kept for the production of food, wool, skin or fur or for other farming purposes. It does not apply to wild animals, animals intended for use in sporting or cultural events (shows), experimental or laboratory animals or invertebrate animals. The Member States must adopt provisions to ensure that the owners or keepers of animals look after the welfare of their animals and see that they are not caused any unnecessary pain, suffering or injury.

EU - Farming - Egg regulation, Number 557 (EC) Number 557/2007

In May 2007, the Commission passed an egg regulation, Number 557, building upon the prior one (Number 1028) and delineating detailed marketing standards for eggs.  The Regulation sets out rules, applicable to virtually all hen eggs sold in the EU,  for the quality and weight grading, packaging, marking, storage, transport and presentation for retail sale of eggs, to ensure that they are marketed on an evenhanded, competitive basis. Though the regulation’s focus is primarily on egg marketing rather than animal welfare, it includes certain provisions that bear upon animal welfare. For instance, the regulation sets out detailed requirements for hen living conditions that must be met before eggs can qualify as “free range,” including open-air runs of low hen density.

EU - Farming - Information Collection during Farm Inspections (2006/778/EC)

A decision concerning minimum requirements for the collection of information during inspections of calf, pig, and hen farms.  Passed in recognition of the fact that collection of data on animal welfare inspections is essential for the European Community to evaluate the impact of its policy in this field, the directive standardized farm inspection reporting procedures, and required annual reports from each member state outlining (a) the most serious instances of non-compliance with EU law, and (b) what was being done to diminish such non-compliance.

EU - Farming Council Regulation (EC) No 1099/2009 on the protection of animals at the time of killing Council Regulation (EC) No 1099/2009

This Regulation aims at enhancing protection of animals at the time of slaughter or killing by establishing standard operating procedures, training of personnel, the use of new equipment, etc. Moreover, the objective pursued by this Regulation is to provide a level playing field within the internal market for all operators.

EU - Fur - Regulation (EC) No 1523/2007 (dog and cat fur ban) Regulation (EC) No 1523/2007
The European Union (EU) bans trade in cat and dog fur, including imports and exports. It also introduces accompanying measures to ensure the effectiveness of this ban.

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