Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
TN - Liens, Veterinary - § 63-12-134. Liens and incumbrances. T. C. A. § 63-12-134

This statute specifically allow vets to hold an animal until a bill is paid for treatment, board or care of an animal.

TN - Licenses - § 68-8-107. Seizure; adoption; destruction. T. C. A. § 68-8-107

This Tennessee statute mandates that any dog found running at large may be seized by any peace officer and placed in an animal shelter in counties or cities where an animal shelter or pound is available. If the dog or cat is wearing a rabies vaccination tag or other identification, all reasonable effort shall be made to locate and notify the owners who shall be required to appear within five (5) days and redeem the animal by paying a pound fee as set by the city or county legislative body.

TN - Initiative - Tennessee Hunting Rights Amendment (2010) Tennessee Hunting Rights Amendment (2010) (passed) The proposed amendment on the 2010 ballot provides for the personal right to hunt and fish subject to state laws, regulations, and existing property rights. The measure also states that "traditional manners and means" may be used to take non-threatened species. It passed with an overwhelming majority of the vote.
TN - Impound - Rabies. § 68-8-109. Observation; confinement or quarantine. T. C. A. § 68-8-109

This Tennessee statute provides that if any animal has bitten any person, is suspected of having bitten any person or is for any reason suspected of being infected with rabies, the animal may be required to be placed under an observation period either by confinement or by quarantine for a period of time deemed necessary by the commissioner or rules of the department.

TN - Hunting, Internet - Part 5. Computer-Assisted Hunting from Remote Locations T. C. A. § 70-4-501 - 504

This set of Tennessee laws prohibits computer-assisted remote hunting or providing or operating facilities for computer-assisted remote hunting if the wildlife being hunted is located in this state. Computer-assisted remote hunting is defined as "the use of a computer or any other device, equipment or software, to control remotely the aiming and discharge of a rifle, shotgun, handgun, bow and arrow, cross-bow or any other implement to hunt wildlife."

TN - Hunting - Part 3. Hunter Protection Act. T. C. A. § 70-4-301 - 303

This section represents Tennessee's "Hunter Protection Act." The law makes it a Class C misdemeanor to interfere with the lawful taking of a wild animal by another with the intent to prevent the taking; disturb or engage in an activity that will tend to disturb a wild animal, with the intent to prevent the lawful taking; disturb a person engaged in lawful hunting with the intent to prevent the taking; enter or remain on land with intent to violate this section; fail to obey a peace officer's orders to desist from conduct in violation of this section; or use a drone with the intent to conduct video surveillance of private citizens who are lawfully hunting or fishing without obtaining the written consent of the persons being surveilled. A person affected by conduct in violation of this section may seek an injunction or recover damages, including punitive damages.

TN - Expert - § 29-26-115. Burden of proof; expert witnesses T. C. A. § 29-26-115

This Tennessee statute provides the requirements for the claimant’s burden of proof under malpractice actions, including, inter alia , the proof that the defendant’s actions fell below the recognized standard of acceptable professional practice in the community, proximate cause, and proof by a preponderance of the evidence that defendant’s actions were negligent.

TN - Exotic Pet - Part 4. Exotic Animals. T. C. A. §§ 70-4-401 - 418

This Tennessee chapter relates to the private possession of wildlife. It is unlawful for any person to possess, transport, import, export, buy, sell, barter, propagate or transfer any wildlife, whether indigenous to this state or not, except as provided by this part and rules and regulations promulgated by the Tennessee wildlife resources commission pursuant to this part. Additionally, no person shall possess Class I (all species inherently dangerous to humans such as wolves, bears, lions and poisonous snakes) or Class II (native species that are  not listed in other classes) wildlife without having documentary evidence showing the name and address of the supplier of such wildlife and date of acquisition. In order to obtain a permit to possess Class I wildlife, a person must be 21, have at least 2 years of experience handling such animals (or take an approved written exam), have a full-time resident caretaker, and must have a plan for the quick and safe recapture of the wildlife, among other provisions. The annual permits and fees for personal possession of  Class I wildlife are $150/animal or $1,000/facility.

TN - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 20. Equine Activities--Liability T. C. A. § 44-20-101 to 105

This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or equine professional, or any other person, including corporations and partnerships, are immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities.   However, there are exceptions to this rule:   a person, corporation, or partnership will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant.   In addition, a person will be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.

TN - Endangered Species - Nongame and Endangered or Threatened Wildlife Species Conservation Act of 1974 T. C. A. § 70-8-101 to 112

These Tennessee statutes comprise the Tennessee Nongame and Endangered or Threatened Wildlife Species Conservation Act of 1974 and includes the legislative intent, definitions, and factors relevant to endangered species investigations.  By statute, it is unlawful for any person to take, attempt to take, possess, transport, export, process, sell or offer for sale or ship nongame wildlife, or for any common or contract carrier knowingly to transport or receive for shipment nongame wildlife.  Violation constitutes a Class B misdemeanor and incurs warrantless searches and seizure of the wildlife taken and the instrumentalities used in the taking.

TN - Ecoterrorism - Part 8. Farm Animal and Research Facilities Protection T. C. A. § 39-14-801 - 806

This chapter comprises the Tennessee Farm Animal and Research Facilities Protection Act. A person commits an offense if, without consent, the person exercises control over an animal facility, an animal from an animal facility, or other property from an animal facility with the intent to deprive the owner of the facility, animal, or property and to disrupt the enterprise conducted at the animal facility. Other offenses include destruction of property, including freeing of animals located there, or entering an animal facility with the intent to disrupt or damage the enterprise or its property. A violation is a Class C felony if the person exercises control over the facility or the damage is $500 or more. A violation is a Class B misdemeanor if the damage is less than $500 or the person illegally enters the facility with intent to damage it. Any person who has been damaged by reason of a violation of this part may recover all actual and consequential damages, punitive damages, and court costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, from the person causing the damage.

TN - Domestic Violence - Part 6 Domestic Abuse T. C. A. § 36-3-601 - 606

Under Tennessee's Domestic Abuse Act, the definitional section states that "abuse" includes  inflicting, or attempting to inflict, physical injury on any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by an adult or minor. Section 606(9) allows the court to direct the care, custody, or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either party or a minor residing in the household. Further, in no instance shall the animal be placed in the care, custody, or control of the respondent, but shall instead be placed in the care, custody or control of the petitioner or in an appropriate animal foster situation.

TN - Dog, dangerous, felon - § 39-17-1363. Violent felony conviction; custody or control of dogs; application T. C. A. § 39-17-1363 Under this Tennessee law, it is an offense for any person convicted of a violent felony to knowingly own, possess, have custody or control of a potentially vicious dog or a vicious dog for a period of ten years after such person has been released from custody following completion of sentence. Additionally, it is an offense for any convicted violent felon to own or have custody of a dog that is not microchipped or spayed/neutered. This section shall only apply if a person's conviction for a violent felony occurs on or after July 1, 2010.
TN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws T. C. A. §§ 44-8-408 - 412; §§ 44-17-101 - 505; T. C. A. § 5-1-120, § 6-54-135, § 39-14-205, § 39-14-213, § 44-14-104, § 70-4-103, § 70-4-112; § 70-4-118, § 70-4-122, § 70-2-214

These Tennessee statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements for companion animal dealers, laws concerning damage done by dogs, and the Tennessee Spay/Neuter Law.

TN - Disaster - Part 8. Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act of 2007 T. C. A. § 58-2-801 - 813

The Tennessee Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act applies to registered volunteer health practitioners who provide health services for a host entity during an emergency. Volunteer health practitioners are not liable for their acts or omissions in providing health services. “Health services” means treatment, care, advice, guidance, or provision of supplies related to the health or death of an animal or to animal populations.

TN - Dangerous dog - § 44-17-120. Death or serious injury; destruction of dogs T. C. A. § 44-17-120

This Tennessee statute provides that any dog which attacks a human and causes death or serious injury may be destroyed upon the order of the circuit court where the attack occurred.  The owner shall be given notice that if he or she does not appear before the court within five days and show cause why the dog should not be destroyed, then the order shall issue and the dog shall be destroyed.  This statute also allows certain counties to make ordinances to petition a general sessions court to provide for the disposition of dangerous dogs and/or dogs causing death or serious injury to humans or other animals.

TN - Dangerous Animals - § 39-17-101. Dangerous snakes or reptiles; handling T. C. A. § 39-17-101

This Tennessee law makes it an offense for a person to display, exhibit, handle, or use a poisonous or dangerous snake or reptile in a manner that endangers the life or health of any person. Violation is a Class C misdemeanor.

TN - Cruelty, reporting - Part 4. Cross Reporting of Animal Cruelty T. C. A. § 38-1-401 - 403

This Tennesee statute requires employees of child or adult protective service agencies to report animal cruelty, abuse, or neglect that they know or reasonably supect to have occurred in their county. The statute also describes the amount of time that an employee may have to make a report and ensures the confidentiality of the employee. The statute also makes clear that it does not impose a duty on the employee to investigate known or reasonably suspected animal cruelty, abuse, or neglect.

TN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes T. C. A. § 39-14-201 to 218; T. C. A. § 40-39-101 - 104

These Tennessee anti-cruelty provisions define "animal" as a domesticated living creature or a wild creature previously captured.  A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals (a Class A misdemeanor)  if he or she intentionally or knowingly tortures, maims or grossly overworks an animal; fails unreasonably to provide necessary food, water, care or shelter for an animal in the person's custody; abandons unreasonably an animal in the person's custody; transports or confines an animal in a cruel manner; or inflicts burns, cuts, lacerations, or other injuries or pain.  Animal fighting is also prohibited under this section, with dog fighting incurring a felony penalty and cockfighting resulting in a misdemeanor in most cases.  A person commits aggravated cruelty (a Class E felony) to animals when, with aggravated cruelty and with no justifiable purpose, he or she intentionally kills or intentionally causes serious physical injury to a companion animal.  Exclusions include animal farming, research, veterinary practices, hunting, trapping, "dispatching" rabid animals or wild animals on one's property, among other things.

TN - Breeder -Part 7. Commercial Breeder Act T. C. A. § 44-17-701 - 715 (expired June 30, 2014)

(Expired June 30, 2014). In 2009, Tennessee enacted its Commercial Breeder Act. The act defines a commercial breeder as means any person who possesses or maintains, under the person’s immediate control, twenty (20) or more unsterilized adult female dogs or cats in this state for the purpose of selling the offspring as companion animals. Commercial breeders must maintain and display licenses to operate in accordance with the act. Further, the act requires commercial breeders to keep on file at all times the number of dogs and cats in their possession and how many were sold during the reporting period. Inspections may occur under the act, but are not mandatory.

TN - Bovine - Chapter 21. Liability of Bovine Owners T. C. A. § 44-21-101 - 104

This chapter operates similarly to equine activity liability laws and provides that a bovine owner shall not be liable for any injury, loss, damage, or death of a person resulting from the inherent risks of bovine activities. The section also requires the posting of warning signs alerting visitors to bovine activities that the owner or operator is not liable.

TN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws T. C. A. § 39-14-208, 212, 216; § 44-17-403, 404; § 55-8-180; § 62-7-112; § 66-7-104, 106; § 66-28-505

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

The Equine Identification (England) Regulations 2018 The Equine Identification (England) Regulations 2018 Owners have two years to ensure all equines born before 30th June 2009 are chipped. Some wild and semi-wild equids are exempt. Non-compliant owners risk being fined.
Tennessee Code: Article V: Cruelty to Animals Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 1668-1672 (1858)

Tennessee's laws concerning cruelty to animals from 1858.  The laws cover what qualifies as cruelty to animals to the punishment to be given a slave that is cruel to animals.

Tennessee Code 1858: Article VI: Killing Game, Poisoning Fish, Fire Hunting Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 1673-1676 (1858)

Tennessee laws from 1858 concerning the hunting of game, poisoning of fish, and the use of fire to hunt. The law establishes the punishment for the above mentioned offenses.

Taiwan - Wildlife - Taiwan Wildlife Conservation Act Taiwan Wildlife Conservation Act An act which aims to conserve wildlife, protect species diversity and maintain the balance of natural ecosystems
Taiwan - Cruelty - Taiwan Animal Protection Law Taiwan Animal Protection Law

This law sets out the umbrella of animal issues for Taiwan. Much of it is so general that additional regulations are going to be required.

Switzerland - Cruelty - Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection of March 9, 1978 Swiss APA 1978

The following is one of two pieces of Swiss legislation concerning animal welfare. It is highly comprehensive and covers all aspects of animal welfare including but not limited to scientific research, farming, treatment of pets, national and international animal sales. This Act clearly states that no one shall unjustifiably expose animals to pain, suffering, physical injury or fear.

Switzerland - Cruelty - Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance 1981

Regulations on Animal Welfare based on the Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection. This piece of legislation is comprehensive, including laws on animal husbandry, animal research, companion animals, breeding, transport and slaughter.

Switzerland - Cruelty - Federal Act and Ordinance on Animal Cruelty Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance 1981

The following is one of two pieces of Swiss legislation concerning animal welfare. It is highly comprehensive and covers all aspects of animal welfare including but not limited to scientific research, farming, treatment of pets, national and international animal sales. This Act clearly states that no one shall unjustifiably expose animals to pain, suffering, physical injury or fear. Regulations on Animal Welfare based on the Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection. This piece of legislation is comprehensive, including laws on animal husbandry, animal research, companion animals, breeding, transport and slaughter.

Switzerland - Cruelty - Animal Protection Ordinance Minimum Requirements Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance 1981 The measurements given in Appendix 1 refer to light areas free of any obstacle. They may be reduced only by rounding of the corners or by feeding and watering appliances positioned in the corners. The measurements given between the brackets are minimum values for existing installations which existed on July 1, 1981 already and, under Article 76, do not need to be adapted.
Sweden - Scientific Research - Swedish Animal Welfare Ordinance SFS 1988:539

This is one of two main pieces of animal welfare legislation in Sweden. It has been edited to contain mostly material relating to animal research.

Sweden - Cruelty - The Sweden Animal Welfare Act SFS 1998:56

The Swedish Animal Welfare Act applies to the care and treatment of domestic animals, and other animals if they are kept in captivity or are used for any of the purposes referred to in section 19 (generally, scientific uses).  It provides that animals shall be treated well and shall be protected from unnecessary suffering and disease, among other things.

Sri Lanka - Cruelty - Chapter 573 Cruelty to Animals (English) Ordinances Nos 13 of 1907, 19 of 1912, 43 of 1917, Y of 1919, 33 of 1921, 16 of 1927, 17 of 1970, 12 of 1945, 22 of 1955 This Ordinance, in English, details Sri Lanka's animal cruelty laws. It also provides provisions for starving animals, using disabled or ill animals for labor, killing animals with unnecessary cruelty, and permitting diseased animals to die in the street. This ordinance also gives the Minister the power to appoint infirmaries to treat and care for animals that are the victims of offenses committed under this ordinance; the owner of the animal is liable for the cost of caring for the infirmed animal. Any Magistrate, Superintendent, or Assistant Superintendent of Police, Judge of primary Court or the divisional Assistant Government Agent of a division may direct the immediate destruction of an animal who was a victim of an offense if in that person's opinion the animal's sufferings are such as to render such a direction proper. Offenders shall be fined or jailed depending on the seriousness of the offence.
South Africa - Protected Areas Act - National Environmental Management No. 57 of 2003: National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act, 2003. This act is to provide for the protection and conservation of ecologically viable areas representative of South Africa’s biological diversity and its natural landscapes and seascapes; for the establishment of a national register of all national, provincial and local protected areas; for the management of those areas in accordance with national norms and standards; for intergovernmental co-operation and public consultation in matters concerning protected areas; and for matters in connection therewith.
South Africa - Endangered Species - List of Endangered Species This is the published list of all the critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable and protected species under South Africa's National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004).
South Africa - Cruelty - Animal Protection NO. 71 OF 1962; ACT NO 24 OF 1935; NO. R. 468 1986; Acts relating to the prevention of cruelty to animals. Contains: Animal Protection Act - page 1 Performing Animal Protection Act (including guard dogs) – page 12 Regulations for Performing Animal Protection Act Regulations of Seizure of Animals by SPCA’s – page 14 Animal Matters Amendment Act, 1993 - page 16
South Africa - Biological Diversity - Regulations These South African regulations were made relating to listed threatened and protected species of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004. The purpose of these regulations is to further regulate the permit system set out in Chapter 7 of the Biodiversity Act insofar as that system applies to restricted activities involving specimens of listed threatened or protected species; to provide for the registration of captive breeding operations, commercial exhibition facilities, game farms, nurseries, scientific institutions, sanctuaries and rehabilitation facilities and wildlife traders; to provide for the regulation of the carrying out of a specific restricted activity, namely hunting; to provide for the prohibition of specific restricted activities involving specific listed threatened or protected species; to provide for the protection of wild populations of listed threatened species; and to provide for the composition and operating procedure of the Scientific Authority.
South Africa - Biodiversity - National Environmental Management No. 10 of 2004: National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004. The objectives of this Act are, within the framework of the National Environmental Management Act, to provide for the management and conservation of biological diversity within the Republic and of the components of such biological diversity; to provide for the use of indigenous biological resources in a sustainable manner; and to provide for the fair and equitable sharing among stakeholders of benefits arising from bioprosgecting involving indigenous biological resources. Other objecitves of this Act are to give effect to ratified international agreements relating to biodiversity which are binding on the Republic; to provide for co-operative governance in biodiversity management and conservation; and to provide for a South African National Biodiversity Institute to assist in achieving the objectives of this Act.
SD - Veterinary - Chapter 36-12. Veterinarians. S D C L § 36-12-1 - 29

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

SD - Vehicle - SDCL § 41-1-12. Euthanasia of animal injured in motor vehicle accident SDCL § 41-1-12 - 13 Any person who has seriously injured a wildlife animal or who comes upon a wildlife animal that has been seriously injured in a motor vehicle accident may euthanize the animal if that person has the means, skill, and will to euthanize humanely.
SD - Vehicle - 41-1-5.7. Disposition of deer and antelope killed by motor vehicle S D C L § 41-1-5.7 This South Dakota statute states that if any deer or antelope is killed by a motor vehicle on a public highway, the person who desires to possess that animal shall notify a conservation officer. The conservation officer may give a dated and written authorization allowing possession of the animal at no fee. However, no part of an animal so obtained may be sold, bartered, or traded.
SD - Trust - 55-1-21. Trust for care of designated animal. S D C L § 55-1-21

South Dakota's pet trust law was enacted in 2006. Amendments to the law in 2018 provide that trusts for the care of a designated animal or animals are valid.

SD - Trap - 41-8-28. Trap robbing or injury as misdemeanor S D C L § 41-8-28

This South Dakota law provides that any person who steals, damages or destroys a trap of another, or who steals, damages, or destroys animals, animal carcasses, or the pelts thereof, held fast by such traps, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

SD - Predator Control - Chapter 40-36. Predatory Animal and Reptile Control. S D C L § 40-36-1 - 46

These South Dakota statutes pertain to predatory animal and reptile control. The Department of Game, Fish and Parks and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service work together to control coyotes, feral dogs, fox, prairie dogs, and other wild animals that are injurious to livestock, poultry, game, land, and the public health. Bounties may be paid for coyotes, if the bounty hunter has a license.

SD - Lost Property - Chapter 43-41. Lost and Found Property. SDCL § 43-41-1 - 11

These statutes comprise South Dakota's lost property provisions.

SD - Licenses - 40-34-5. Running at large prohibited by county--County license or tax on dogs S D C L § 40-34-5

This South Dakota statute provides that the board of county commissioners of each of the counties shall have the power to regulate, restrain or prohibit the running at large of dogs and to impose a license or tax on all dogs not licensed or taxed under municipal ordinance, owned or kept by any person within the county.

SD - Hunting - 41-1-8. Interference with lawful hunting, trapping, or fishing prohibited--Violation as misdemeanor S D C L § 41-1-8 to 10

This South Dakota law reflects the state's hunter harassment provision. The law prohibits a person from intentionally interfering with any person or group of persons lawfully engaged in the process of taking or attempting to take any game or fish. This includes actions specifically intended to harass and any activity intended to scare or disturb game with the specific intent of preventing their lawful taking. Violation is a Class 2 misdemeanor.

SD - Fur - Chapter 40-35. Domesticated Fur-Bearing Animals. S D C L § 40-35-1 to 6

These South Dakota statutes pertain to domesticated fur-bearing animals. These animals are subject to private ownership, and documentation is required to possess live fur-bearing animals. Products made from domestic furbearers are considered to be agricultural products and breeding such animals, or marketing the products, is an agricultural pursuit subject to the Department of Agriculture.

SD - Exotic Pets - Chapter 40-3. State Animal Industry Board (captive wildlife provisions) S D C L § 40-3-23 - 29; SDCL § 7-12-29

These South Dakota statutes establish the Animal Industry Board, which promulgate rules to allow nondomestic mammals that are safe to the public and to the free-roaming animals of the state to be imported or possessed. The Board regulates the breeding, raising, marketing, and transportation of any captive nondomestic mammals. The Board may also develop and implement programs to identify animals and premises involved to further animal health and food safety.

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