Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
FL - Impound - Abandonment of animals by owner; procedure for handling West's F. S. A. § 705.19

This Florida statute provides that any animal placed in the custody of a licensed veterinarian or bona fide boarding kennel that is abandoned by its owner or for a period of more than 10 days after written notice is given to the owner may be turned over to the custody of the nearest humane society or dog pound in the area for disposal as such custodian may deem proper.  This provisions immunizes such facilities from liability resulting from this action.

FL - Initiatives - Florida Amendment Article X Section 19 (pregnant pigs) Florida Amendment Article X Section 19 (2002) (note: adopted as Section 21) This ballot proposal addresses the inhumane treatment of animals, specifically, pregnant pigs. To prevent cruelty to animals and as recommended by The Humane Society of the United States, no person shall confine a pig during pregnancy in a cage, crate or other enclosure, or tether a pregnant pig, on a farm so that the pig is prevented from turning around freely, except for veterinary purposes and during the prebirthing period; provides definitions, penalties, and an effective date. This measure passed in the November 2002 election with 54% of the vote.
FL - Liens - 713.65. Liens for care and maintenance of animals West's F.S.A. § 713.50, 65, 655

These Florida laws concern liens for the care and maintenance of animals. The first section declares that the liens mentioned in the chapter include the described personal property under the circumstances mentioned in each section. Section 713.65 then describes that a lien exists in favor of all persons for the "feeding or caring for the horse or other animal of another, including all keepers of livery, sale or feed or feed stables, for feeding or taking care of any horse or other animal put in their charge; upon such horse or other animal." Based on the broad language of "other animal," a lien exists for the care and feeding of all owned animals.

FL - Liens, veterinary - 713.655. Liens for professional services of veterinarians West's F. S. A. § 713.655

This section comprises Florida's veterinary lien law. A lien exists in favor of any veterinarian who renders professional services to an animal at the request of the owner of the animal, the owner's agent, or a bailee, lessee, or custodian of the animal, for the unpaid portion of the fees for such professional services. The lien remains valid and enforceable for a period of 1 year from the date the professional services were rendered, and such lien is to be enforced in the manner provided for the enforcement of other liens on personal property in this state.

FL - Lost Property - Lost or Abandoned Property West's F. S. A. § 705.101 - 19

These Florida statutes comprise the state's lost property statutes.

FL - Ordinances - Interpretation of Dog Ordinances under Dangerous Dogs West's F. S. A. § 767.07

This Florida statute provides that the statutory section relating to state regulation of dangerous dogs is supplemental to all other state laws affecting dogs and shall not be construed to modify those laws or to prevent municipalities from prohibiting, licensing, or regulating the running at large of dogs within their respective limits by law or ordinance.

FL - Restaurant - 509.233. Public food service establishment requirements; local exemption for dogs West's F. S. A. § 509.233

Florida was one of the first states to enact a law on dogs in restaurants in 2006. The law allows a local unit of government to adopt an ordinance that acts as an exemption to the state's Food and Drug Administration Food Code. Once the local exemption is passed, a restaurant can apply for a permit to allow dogs in the outdoor dining spaces. Certain things must be included in the ordinance such as a requirement that staff wash after touching pets, a rule that patrons keep dogs on leashes and under control, a prohibition against dogs on chairs, tables, or other furnishings, signs that list the rules for employees and patrons, and a clean-up station in the outdoor dining area. There are also reporting requirements by the local governments to the State of Florida under the law. The city or county must also have a system in place to document and respond to complaints.

FL - Sharks - 379.2426. Possession of separated shark fins on the water prohibited; penalties West's F.S.A. § 379.2426 This Florida law prohibits a person from possessing in or on the waters a shark fin that has been separated from a shark or land a separated shark fin unless possession is authorized by a commission rule or such fin has been lawfully obtained on land, prepared by taxidermy, and is possessed for the purposes of display. A first-time violation is a misdemeanor of the second degree, which includes a fine of up to $4,500 and suspension of license privileges for 180 days. Subsequent violations result in enhanced penalties.
FL - Sterilization - Chapter 823. Public Nuisances West's F. S. A. § 823.15

This Florida law declares that it is the public policy of the state that every feasible means be used to reduce the incidence of birth of unneeded and unwanted puppies and kittens.  In furtherance of this policy, provision shall be made for the sterilization of all dogs and cats sold or released for adoption from any public or private animal shelter or animal control agency by either providing sterilization by a licensed veterinarian before relinquishing custody of the animal or entering into a written agreement with the adopter or purchaser guaranteeing that sterilization will be performed within 30 days or prior to sexual maturity. All costs of sterilization pursuant to this section shall be paid by the prospective adopter unless otherwise provided for by ordinance of the local governing body or provided for by the humane society governing body.

FL - Trust, animal - Chapter 736. Florida Trust Code West's F. S. A. § 736.0408

This Florida statute provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates on the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, on the death of the last surviving animal.

FL - Vehicle - 316.0825. Vehicle approaching an animal West's F. S. A. § 316.0825 Every person operating a motor vehicle shall use reasonable care when approaching or passing a person who is riding or leading an animal upon a roadway or the shoulder thereof. A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction.
FL - Veterinary - Veterinary Medical Practice. West's F. S. A. § 474.201 - 221

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

FL - Wildlife - Chapter 379. Fish and Wildlife Conservation. West's F. S. A. § 379.231 - 504

These Florida laws concern the keeping and taking of captive wildlife. Places where wildlife is held in captivity are subject to inspection by the officers of the state commission at any time. The commission shall promulgate rules defining Class I, Class II, and Class III types of wildlife. A companion statutory section provides that, in order to assure humane treatment of captive wildlife, no person, firm, corporation or association shall be in possession of captive wildlife for public display unless a permit has been obtained. The cost of the permit depends on whether the species fall into Class I, II, or III).

Florida - Initiatives - Amendment 13, Ban on Wagering on Dog Races Amendment 13 A proposed revision relating to ending dog racing; creating new sections in Article X and Article XII of the State Constitution to prohibit the racing of, and wagering on, greyhounds and other dogs after a specified date.
GA - Alligators - Article 7. Feeding of Wild Alligators Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-170

This Georgia law makes it illegal to willfully feed or bait any wild alligator not in captivity. Violation is a misdemeanor with a fine of up to $200 or confinement up to 30 days, or both.

GA - Assistance Animal - Georgia's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Ga. Code Ann., § 30-4-2 to 4; Ga. Code Ann., § 40-6-94; Ga. Code Ann., § 16-12-120; Ga. Code Ann., § 16-11-107.1

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

GA - Bite - § 51-2-6. Dogs, liability of owner or keeper for injuries to livestock Ga. Code Ann., § 51-2-6 to 7

This Georgia statute represents the state's relevant dog bite strict liability law.  While the law imposes strict liability for injury to a person, the dog (or other animal) must first be considered "vicious" or "dangerous," which can be as simple as showing the animal was required to be leashed per city ordinance.  Second, the animal must be at large by the careless management of the owner.  Finally, the person injured must not have provoked the animal into attacking him or her.

GA - Cruelty - Chapter 11. Animal Protection Ga. Code Ann., § 4-11-1 to 18

The Georgia Animal Protection Act was passed in 2000 and provides for jail up to one year for general cruelty convictions and up to five years for an aggravated cruelty conviction.  The judge is also allowed to order psychological counseling.  The law also encompasses licensing provisions for kennels and impoundment provisions.

GA - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws Ga. Code Ann., § 16-12-4, § 16-6-6

This comprises Georgia's anti-cruelty provisions.  Under the statute, "animal" does not include any fish or any pest that might be exterminated or removed.  A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals when he or she causes death or unjustifiable physical pain or suffering to any animal by an act, an omission, or willful neglect. Any person convicted of a violation of this subsection shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, but subsequent convictions incur enhanced penalties.  A person commits the offense of aggravated cruelty to animals when he or she knowingly and maliciously causes death or physical harm to an animal by rendering a part of such animal's body useless or by seriously disfiguring such animal.

GA - Dangerous Dog Ordinances - Chapter 8. Dogs Ga. Code Ann., § 4-8-29

This Georgia statute states the standards and requirements for the control of dangerous dogs and vicious dogs; this statute also proscribes penalties for violations of these standards and requirements. For instance, a violation of this article is a misdemeanor of high and aggravated nature; repeated violations of this article is a felony.

GA - Deer Hunting - § 27-5-12. Unlawful to kill or wound farmed deer or wild animal held Ga. Code Ann., § 27-5-12

Under this Georgia statute, it is unlawful to shoot, kill, or wound any wild animal held under a wild animal license or permit or any farmed deer for enjoyment, gain, amusement, or sport.

GA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Ga. Code Ann., § 4-8-1 - 45; Ga. Code Ann., § 4-14-1 - 4-15-1; Ga. Code Ann., § 26-2-160; Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-16 - 18; § 27-3-49; Ga. Code Ann., § 16-11-107 - 107.1; Ga. Code Ann., § 50-3-88

These Georgia statutes comprise the state's dog laws and the "Responsible Dog Ownership Law.".  Among the provisions of the Responsible Dog Ownership Law include a requirement for registration of dangerous dogs as well as the necessity of such owner to carry at least $50,000 in liability insurance.  Owners of these dogs who do not comply with these and other provisions may have their dogs confiscated and destroyed. Any person who violates this article is guilty of a misdemeanor.

GA - Dogfighting - Article 2. Gambling and Related Offenses. Ga. Code Ann., § 16-12-37

Georgia's dogfighting statute states that any person who owns, possesses, trains, transports, or sells any dog with the intent that such dog shall be engaged in fighting with another dog, wagers money or anything of value on the result of such dogfighting, knowingly permits dogfighting on his or her premises, knowingly promotes or advertises an exhibition of fighting commits the offense of dogfighting .  Violation of the law is a felony, with a mandatory  fine of $5,000.00 or a mandatory fine of $5,000.00 in addition to imprisonment for not less than one year nor more than five years. On a second or subsequent conviction, such person shall be punished by imprisonment of not less than one nor more than ten years, a fine of not less than $15,000.00, or both such fine and imprisonment. Any person who is knowingly present only as a spectator at any place for the fighting of dogs shall, upon a first conviction thereof, be guilty of a misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature.  

GA - Ecoterrorism - Article 2. Georgia Farm Animal, Crop, and Research Facilities Protection Act Ga. Code Ann., § 4-11-30 to 35

This article is known as the Georgia Farm Animal, Crop, and Research Facilities Protection Act. A person commits an offense if, without the consent of the owner, the person acquires or otherwise exercises control over an animal facility, an animal from an animal facility, or other property from an animal facility with the intent to deprive the owner of such facility, animal, or property and to disrupt or damage the enterprise conducted at the animal facility. Other prohibited actions also include gaining entry where a person knows entry is forbidden. In the definition of "consent," the act states that the term does not include assent that is induced by force, threat, false pretenses or fraud. It also excludes assent given by a person that the actor knows is not authorized by the owner, or given by a person who the actor knows is unable to make reasonable decisions (e.g., because of youth, intoxication, or mental disease or defect). Violations that involve exercising control over a facility are felonies; those that involve illegal entry or damage less than $500 are misdemeanors.

GA - Endangered - Article 5. Protection of Endangered Wildlife Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-130 to 133

These statutes provide for the definition of "protected" species and outline the duties of the board responsible for enforcing Georgia's endangered species law.  Included in the Board's duties are inventorying and designating listed species and promulgating regulations.  Violation of these regulations results in a misdemeanor.

GA - Equine Liability Act - Chapter 12. Injuries from Equine or Llama Activities. Ga. Code Ann., § 4-12-1 to 7 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or professional, or a llama sponsor or professional, or any other person, including corporations, are immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine or llama activities.   However, there are exceptions to this rule:   A person will be held liable for injuries if they display a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if they fail to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant.
GA - Exotic pets, wildlife - Chapter 5. Wild Animals Ga. Code Ann., § 27-5-1 to 12

These Georgia wildlife provisions embody the General Assembly's finding that it is in the public interest to ensure the public health, safety, and welfare by strictly regulating in this state the importation, transportation, sale, transfer, and possession of certain wild animals. Animals such as kangaroos, certain non-human primates, wolves, bears, big cats, hippopotamus, and crocodile, among others, are considered to be inherently dangerous to human beings and are subject to the license or permit and insurance requirements outlined in the laws. The section also details specifications for the humane handling, care, confinement and transportation of certain wild animals.

GA - Fur - Article 2. Trapping, Trappers, and Fur Dealers Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-60 to 73

Under these GA statutes, trappers and fur-dealers must be licensed. Trapping of fur-bearing animals is allowed during open trapping season. Traps must be inspected at least once every 24 hours. Trappers must dispatch fur-bearing animals caught in a trap and release domestic animals. It is legal to set traps to protect livestock and domestic animals from predators, but unlawful to trap upon the right of way of any public road or upon another’s land.  A violation of these statutes is a misdemeanor.

GA - Horse Meat - Article 4. Advertisement and Sale of Meat Generally. Ga. Code Ann., § 26-2-150 to 161

As stated in the legislative intent, the General Assembly declares that purchasers and consumers have a right to expect and demand honesty and fair practices in the sale of meat for human consumption. It is the purpose of this Code to ensure that honest, fair, and ethical practices are followed in the advertising and sale of meat for human consumption. With regard to horsemeat, the Code prohibits the slaughter a horse in this state for the purpose of selling or offering for sale for human consumption or for other than human consumption the horse meat derived from such slaughtered animal unless certain conditions are met. Further, no horse meat shall be sold or offered for sale in this state for human consumption unless at the place of sale there shall be posted in a conspicuous location a sign bearing the words “HORSE MEAT FOR SALE.”

GA - Horses - Chapter 13. Humane Care for Equines. Ga. Code Ann., § 4-13-1 to 10

This section comprises Georgia's Humane Care for Equines Act. The act states that it is unlawful for the owner of any equine to fail to provide adequate food and water to such equine; to fail to provide humane care for such equine; or to unnecessarily overload, overdrive, torment, or beat any equine or to cause the death of any equine in a cruel or inhumane manner. The Act also outlines procedures for the care impounded of equines as well as disposal procedures, which includes auction and euthanasia, when the owner cannot be found or refuses to enter into a consent order. Violation of this chapter results a misdemeanor.

GA - Hunting - Article 6. Interference with Lawful Taking. Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-150 to 152

These Georgia laws comprise the state's hunter harassment provisions. Under the section, it is unlawful for any person to interfere with the lawful taking of wildlife by another person by intentionally preventing or attempting to prevent such person from such lawful taking of wildlife; engage in activity tending to disturb wildlife for the purpose of intentionally preventing the lawful taking of such wildlife; or fail to obey an order of a law enforcement officer to desist from prohibited conduct. The section also allows the superior court of a county to enjoin prohibited conduct and imposes civil liability on violators.

GA - Hunting - Chapter 3. Wildlife Generally Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-22 Georgia is unique as it prohibits the killing, possession, sale, and transporting of eagles and other migratory birds except for the transportation of feathers into the state of non-migratory birds for millinery purposes (the making of hats or headdresses).
GA - Hunting - § 27-3-12. Use of drugs, poisons, chemicals, smoke, gas, explosives Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-12

This Georgia law prohibits computer assisted remote hunting or providing or operating a facility that allows others to engage in computer assisted remote hunting if the wild animal or wildlife being hunted or shot is located in this state. The law also makes it unlawful to hunt hunt any wild animal, game animal, or game bird by means of drugs, poisons, chemicals, smoke, gas, explosives, recorded calls or sounds, or recorded and electronically imitated or amplified sounds or calls. Violation is a misdemeanor (high) with a fine of $1,000 to $5,000 and/or a term of imprisonment up to 12 months.

GA - Hunting - § 27-3-28. Possession of wildlife accidentally killed by motor vehicle Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-28 This Georgia states that except as otherwise provided in this Code, any person may lawfully possess native wildlife which have been accidentally killed by a motor vehicle. However, the person taking possession of a bear accidentally killed by a motor vehicle shall notify a law enforcement officer within 48 hours after taking possession of the bear; and this Code section shall not authorize any person to take possession of any animal of a species designated as a protected species under Article 5 of this chapter or under federal law.
GA - Hunting, Canned - Article 4. Shooting Preserves. Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-110 to 115

Under the Georgia canned hunting statute, it is unlawful for any person to release pen raised game birds, unless the person has first obtained a license. It it unlawful to hunt pen raised game birds, other than ringed-neck pheasants, on a shooting preserve except between October 1 and March 31, and except from one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. It is unlawful for any person to propagate, possess, or release on any shooting preserve any bird or animal except game raised pen birds unless the person has received prior written approval from the department. Licensees must maintain a complete record of all pen raised game birds propagated, released, or taken on the preserve.

GA - Initiatives - Georgia Amendment 2 (right to hunt) 2006 Georgia Amendment 2 This Georgia constitutional amendment was presented to voters on the 2006 ballot. The measure preserves the state's tradition of hunting and fishing for the public good. Amendment 2 passed by a margin of 81% to 19%.
GA - Liens, veterinary - Article 8. Liens. Part 9. Veterinarians and Boarders of Animals. Ga. Code Ann., § 44-14-490 to 494

This section of Georgia laws deals with veterinary liens. Every licensed veterinarian in Georgia has a lien on each animal or pet treated, boarded, or cared for by him or her while in his or her custody and under contract with the owner of the animal or pet for the payment of charges for the treatment, board, or care of the animal or pet. The veterinarian has the right to retain the animal or pet until the charges are paid. There is a ten-day hold period after demand for payment (made in person or by registered or certified mail) until the pet is deemed abandoned and may be disposed of by the veterinary facility.

GA - Ordinances - Jurisdiction and duties of local governments Ga. Code Ann., § 4-8-22

This Georgia statute provides authority for local governing units to enforce this article. This statute further establishes that the local government shall designate an individual as a dog control officer to aid in the administration and enforcement of the provisions of this article; the dog control officer does not have the authority to make arrests unless the person is a law enforcement officer. Additionally, this article also allows local governments to make arrangements with each other for consolidation of dog control services.

GA - Rabies - Chapter 19. Control of Rabies Ga. Code Ann., § 31-19-1 to 10

This GA statute pertains to the control of rabies. Any person bitten by an animal suspected of being rabid must notify the county board of health. The owner of any animal which has bitten any person or animal, or exhibits signs of rabies, must notify the county board of health. The owner must also confine the animal. A violation is a misdemeanor.

GA - Trust for the care of an animal; creation; termination - Chapter 12. Trusts Ga. Code Ann., § 53-12-28

This Georgia law enacted in 2010 provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal that is alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust shall terminate upon the death of such animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

GA - Veterinary - Veterinary Practice Code Ga. Code Ann., § 43-50-1 to 110

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners. The chapter was recently amended in 2018.

GA - Wildlife rehabilitation - Chapter 2. Licenses, Permits, and Stamps Generally Ga. Code Ann., § 27-2-22

This Georgia law makes it unlawful for any person to keep sick or injured wildlife without first obtain a wildlife rehabilitation permit from the state department.

GA - Wildlife, transportation - Article 3. Transportation Ga. Code Ann., § 27-3-90 to 94

This GA statute pertains to transporting wildlife. It is unlawful to transport any wildlife taken in this state without a license or permit. It is unlawful to transport wildlife by a carrier unless the person files with the carrier a written statement giving his name and address and the number of wildlife to be transported and specifying that he lawfully took the wildlife. It is unlawful to transport any wildlife (or parts) for propagation or scientific purposes without a valid scientific collecting permit.

Germany - Cruelty - German Animal Welfare Act Federal Law Gazette I, p. 1094

This is the primary piece of animal welfare legislation in Germany. It enforces the utilitarian principle that there must be good reason for one to cause an animal harm and identifies that it is the responsibility of human beings to protect the lives and well-being of their fellow creatures. For a discussion on the German Animal Welfare Act as compared to other European and United States animal welfare laws, see Detailed Discussion.

HI - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws H R S § 711-1109.4; § 711-1109.5; § 143-4; § 347-2.5 - 20; H R S § 142-5.5

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

HI - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws (Chapter 711) H R S § 711-1100 to 1110.5

Under this set of Hawaii laws, a person commits the misdemeanor offense of cruelty to animals if the person intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, cruelly beats or starves any animal, deprives a pet animal of necessary sustenance, mutilates, poisons, or kills without need any animal other than insects, vermin, or other pests, or engages in animal fighting enterprises.  Dog fighting constitutes a felony where the person owns or trains the dog to fight.  The section has enhanced penalties for cruelty to guide or service animals or interference with their duties.

HI - Disaster; Accomodations for Pets - Chapter 128. Civil Defense and Emergency Act. HRS § 128-10.5 - §§ 128-1 to 128-34. Repealed by Laws 2014, ch. 111, § 24, eff. July 1, 2014

Repealed by Laws 2014, ch. 111, § 24, eff. July 1, 2014. The repealed laws stated that the governor was to prescribe rules to establish criteria, requirements, conditions, and limitations for providing accommodations to shelter pet animals. The director of civil defense was to identify public and private shelters that are suitable to shelter pets.

HI - Dog - General Dog Provisions H R S § 143-1 - 20; H R S § 183D-65

This Hawaii statute provides the pertinent regulations for dogs in the state.  Included in its provisions are licensing, impoundment, seizure of loose or unlicensed dogs, and stray animals.  Of particular note is a provision that makes it unlawful for any officer to knowingly sell or give any impounded dog to any person, firm, corporation, association, medical college, or university for the purpose of animal experimentation.

HI - Dog Bite - Chapter 142. Animals, Brands, and Fences. H R S § 142-74, 75

This Hawaii statute provides that the owner of any dog that has bitten a human being shall have the duty to take such reasonable steps as are necessary to prevent the recurrence of such incident.  Whenever  a dog has bitten a human being on at least two separate occasions (with no applicable exceptions), any person may bring an action against the owner of the dog.  Each county may enact and enforce ordinances regulating persons who own, harbor, or keep any dog that has bitten, injured, or maimed a person.  No ordinance enacted under this subsection shall be held invalid on the ground that it covers any subject or matter embraced within any statute or rule of the State; provided that the ordinance shall not affect the civil liability of a person owning the offending dog. 

HI - Dog Bite - CHAPTER 663. TORT ACTIONS. H R S § 663-9 - § 663-9.1 This statute represents Hawaii's relevant dog bite law. Under the statute, an owner or harborer of an animal is strictly liable for personal or property damage to any person, regardless of the animal owner's or harborer's lack of scienter of the vicious or dangerous propensities of the animal.

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