Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
CO - Pet Shop - Article 80. Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act C. R. S. A. § 35-80-101 - 117 This Colorado Act regulates pet animal facilities (i.e., shelters, large kennels, and breeders). The Act covers licensing of the facilities and those activities deemed unlawful, such as selling a kitten or puppy under the age of 8 weeks and refusing a lawful inspection.
CO - Ordinances - Pet animal control and licensing C. R. S. A. § 30-15-101 This Colorado statute states that the board of county commissioners of any county may adopt a resolution for the control and licensing of dogs. These regulations may require licensing of dogs by owners, require that dogs and other pet animals be under control at all times and define "control," define "vicious dog" and "vicious animal," establish a dog pound, or other animal holding facility, provide for the impoundment of animals which are vicious, not under control, or otherwise not in conformity with the resolutions, and establish such other reasonable regulations and restrictions for the control of dogs and other pet animals.
CO - Ordinances - Animal control officers--Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power. C. R. S. A. § 30-15-105 This Colorado statute provides that personnel engaged in animal control may issue citations or summonses and complaints enforcing the county dog control resolution or any other county resolution concerning the control of pet animals or municipal ordinance. Officers assigned to this capacity may be referred to as "peace officers."
CO - Lien, veterinary - Part 1. Lien on Personal Property. C.R.S.A. § 38-20-102, 103 These Colorado laws concern liens on pet animals for persons who are entrusted with caring for the animals. Under 38-20-102, any feeder, veterinarian, or other person entrusted with the pet for feeding, keeping, boarding, or medical shall have a lien for the amount of costs incurred in the care of the animal. Any contracts (or copies thereof) made by the owner of the pet animal with the person caring for the animals may be filed with the county clerk where the owner resides (or where the contract was made for non-residents). The filing of this contract constitutes notice to the contents of the contract and the legal effect of the filing.
CO - Initiatives - Amendment 13 (livestock operations) Amendment 13. Uniform Regulation of Livestock Operations This 1998 Colorado ballot measure sought to create uniform livestock regulations based on the potential environmental impact that the operation causes (rather than the character of the farm). It specifically sought to target the non-point pollution caused by large-scale operation run-off. The measure further added a definition for "livestock." It failed at the polls with only 38.7% of the vote.
CO - Initiatives - Amendment 14, Regulation of Commercial Hog Facilities Amendment 14, 1998 This 1998 Colorado Ballot Measure created additional regulations for large-scale hog producers. The goal was to better curb the waste run-off from such facilities. It passed in the 1998 election with 64.2% of the vote.
CO - Impoundment - Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power. C. R. S. A. § 30-15-104 This Colorado statute immunizes the board of county commissioners or other local governing entity from liability associated with the impoundment of pet animals. Specifically, it states the board or anyone authorized to enforce a local ordinance shall not be held responsible for any accident or subsequent disease that may occur to the animal in connection with the administration of the resolution or ordinance.
CO - Impound - Colorado Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act C. R. S. A. § 35-80-106.3 This is an example of a state statute that creates minimum holding periods that shelters must hold found pets for before allowing the pets to be adopted or otherwise disposed of.
CO - Impound - Article 4. Disease Control C. R. S. A. § 25-4-610 This Colorado statute provides that it is unlawful for any owner of any dog, cat, other pet animal, or other mammal which has not been inoculated as required by the order of the county board of health or board of health of a health department to allow it to run at large. The health department or health officer may capture and impound any such dog, cat, other pet animal.
CO - Hunting - Willful Destruction of Wildlife C. R. S. A. § 33-6-117 Colorado has a unique statute specific to poaching for the purpose of acquiring parts or "trophies" from an animal with the intent of abandoning the carcass, or even soliciting someone else to do so. Taking or hunting big game, eagles, or endangered species with this intent results in a felony. The intent of the law is stated "to protect the wildlife from wanton, ruthless, or wasteful destruction or mutilation for their heads, hides, claws, teeth, antlers, horns, internal organs, or feathers."
CO - Humane Slaughter - Article 33. Custom Processing of Meat Animals. C. R. S. A. § 35-33-101 to 407 This Colorado section includes both the meat processing laws and the humane slaughter provisions. It covers livestock, which are defined as cattle, calves, sheep, swine, horses, mules, goats, and any other animal which may be used in and for the preparation of meat or meat products. No processor shall shackle, hoist, or otherwise bring livestock into position for slaughter or shall slaughter livestock except by humane methods as defined by regulation; the use of a manually operated hammer, sledge, or poleax is not permitted. Additionally, poultry shall be slaughtered in accordance with "good commercial practices" and in a manner that will result in thorough bleeding.  Any person who violates any provision is subject to a civil penalty of not more than $750 per violation for each day of violation and commits a class 2 misdemeanor.
CO - Fur - § 12b. Prohibited methods of taking wildlife (Constitutional Provision) CO CONST Art. 18, § 12b This Colorado constitutional provision provides that it is unlawful to take wildlife with any leghold trap, any instant kill body-gripping design trap, or by poison or snare in the state of Colorado subject to the listed exceptions.
CO - Farming - Decreto 2113 de 2017 Decreto 2113 de 2017 “Adds a Chapter to Title 3, part 13, 2nd book of Decree 1071, 2015 (Sole Regulatory Decree of the Agricultural, Fisheries, and Rural Development Administrative Sector), titled “Animal welfare for production species in the agricultural sector,” which establishes the general provisions and requirements for livestock Animal Welfare in the agricultural sector. Among other things, it establishes that Decree 1071, 2015 is framed based on the five freedoms (freedom from hunger and thirst; freedom from discomfort; freedom from pain, injury, and disease; freedom to express normal and natural behavior) and defines production animals as “vertebrates and invertebrates used in commercial production.” Some of the general aspects include that surfaces (for walking, resting, etc.) must be adapted to the species in order to minimize the risks of injury or transmission of diseases or parasites to the animals. The environmental conditions must allow for comfortable rest and safe and comfortable movements, including changes in normal postures, as well as allow the animals to show natural behavior. Allowing animals to be in social groups encourages positive social behaviors and minimizes injury, disorder, or chronic fear. When painful procedures cannot be avoided, pain should be managed to the extent available methods allow. Animal handling should promote a positive relationship between humans and animals and not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress. Finally, the Colombian Agricultural Institute (ICA) is the enforcing authority in charge of imposing sanctions for violations of animal health and welfare regulations.
CO - Farming - Article 50.5. Confinement of Calves Raised for Veal and Pregnant Sows C. R. S. A. § 35-50.5-101 to 103 This 2008 Colorado statute applies to the confinement of calves raised for veal and pigs during pregnancy. This statute provides that calves raised for veal and sows during pregnancy must be able to lie down, stand up, and turn around without touching the sides of their enclosure.
CO - Facility dog - § 16-10-404. Use of a court facility dog--definitions C. R. S. A. § 16-10-404 This Colorado law enacted in 2019 states that a court may order order that a witness's testimony be offered while a court facility dog is in the courtroom during a criminal proceeding if the judge determines by a preponderance of the evidence that: (1) the presence of a court facility dog with the witness during the witness's testimony would reduce the witness's anxiety and enhance the ability of the court to receive full and accurate testimony; (2) the arrangements for an available court facility dog during the witness's testimony would not interfere with efficient criminal proceedings; and (3) no prejudice would result to any party due to the presence of a court facility dog with the witness. A "court facility dog" must be a graduate of an accredited internationally recognized assistance dog organization.
CO - Exotic - Article 81. Hybrid Animals C. R. S. A. § 35-81-101 to 102 This Colorado statute authorized the commissioner of the department of agriculture to appoint and convene an advisory group to study the behavior of hybrid canids (wolf hybrids) and felines, including a review of any incidents involving property damage and personal injury caused by such animals. The department was to present its findings and proposals for legislation in January of 1998.
CO - Equine Activity Liability Statute - Article 21. Damages. C. R. S. A. § 13-21-119 This Colorado statute embodies the intent of the general assembly to encourage equine activities and llama activities by limiting the civil liability of those involved in such activities. This section also contains specific provisions related to llama activities. Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine or llama sponsor provided faulty equipment or tack, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the activity, owned or otherwise possessed the land upon which an injury occurred where there was a known latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.
CO - Environment - Ley 1333, 2009 Ley 1333, 2009 Ley 1333, 2009, establishes the fines, sanctions, injunctions, and corresponding procedures for violations of environmental regulations. It establishes provisional dispositions, preventive seizure procedures of flora and fauna, and guidelines on how to proceed when the environmental authority does not have the infrastructure or equipment to keep wildlife individual specimens. It creates information portals for the control of environmental regulations called the Unique Registry of Environmental Wrongdoers (RUIA), and the Wildlife Information Portal (PIFS).
CO - Endangered Species - Article 2. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation C. R. S. A. § 33-2-101 - 108 These Colorado statutes provide the State's intent to protect endangered, threatened, or rare species and defines the terms associated with the statute. It also has a provision specific to the reintroduction of the bonytail and black-footed ferret. Under the management program, Colorado law provides for the acquisition of habitat for species listed as well as other protective measures.
CO - Emergency - § 25-3.5-203. Emergency medical service providers--certification C. R. S. A. § 25-3.5-203 This law concerns emergency medical service providers. An emergency medical service provider may provide preveterinary emergency care to dogs and cats to the extent the provider has received commensurate training and is authorized by the employer to provide the care. Requirements governing the circumstances under which emergency medical service providers may provide preveterinary emergency care to dogs and cats may be specified in the employer's policies governing the provision of care. “Preveterinary emergency care” means the immediate medical stabilization of a dog or cat by an emergency medical service provider, in an emergency to which the emergency medical service provider is responding, through means including oxygen, fluids, medications, or bandaging, with the intent of enabling the dog or cat to be treated by a veterinarian. “Preveterinary emergency care” does not include care provided in response to an emergency call made solely for the purpose of tending to an injured dog or cat, unless a person's life could be in danger attempting to save the life of a dog or cat.
CO - Domestic Violence - Animals and Domestic Violence; Definition. C. R. S. A. § 18-6-800.3; C.R.S.A. § 13-14-101, 103 This statute includes within the definition of "domestic violence" any other crime against a person, or against property, including an animal, or any municipal ordinance violation against a person, or against property, including an animal, when used as a method of coercion, control, punishment, intimidation, or revenge directed against a person with whom the actor is or has been involved in an intimate relationship. Under Article 14 on Civil Protection Orders, the phrase "protection order” means any order that prohibits the restrained person from contacting, harassing, injuring, intimidating, molesting, threatening, touching, stalking, or sexually assaulting or abusing any protected person or from entering or remaining on premises, or from coming within a specified distance of a protected person or premises, or from taking, transferring, concealing, harming, disposing of or threatening harm to an animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by a protected person, or any other provision to protect the protected person from imminent danger to life or health.
CO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws C. R. S. A. § 35-43-126; § 13-21-124; § 24-80-910.5; § 25-4-601 to 615; § 30-15-101 to 105; § 33-3-106; § 33-4-101.3; § 33-6-128; § 35-42.5-101; § 35-50-112 These Colorado statutes represent the state's dog laws. There are provisions regarding civil actions against dog owners for dog bites, rabies control, animal control and licensing, and pertinent wildlife regulations, such as a general ban on harassing wildlife and destroying dens or nests. However, there is an exception making it permissible to take wildlife when it is causing excessive damage to property.
CO - Dog Bite - Civil actions against dog owners. C. R. S. A. § 13-21-124 This 2005 Colorado law makes a dog owner strictly liable for dog bites only if the victim of the bite suffers serious bodily injury or death from being bitten by a dog while lawfully on public or private property regardless of the viciousness or dangerous propensities of the dog or the dog owner's knowledge or lack of knowledge of the dog's viciousness or dangerous propensities. Further, the victim is entitled to recover only economic damages (as opposed to noneconomic damages like pain and suffering, inconvenience, etc.) in a civil suit against the dog owner. Also, the statute provides that an owner is not liable where the victim is unlawfully on public or private property; where the victim is on the owner's property and the the property is clearly and conspicuously marked with one or more posted signs stating "no trespassing" or "beware of dog"; where the victim has clearly provoked the dog; where the victim is a veterinary health care worker, dog groomer, humane agency staff person, professional dog handler, trainer, or dog show judge acting in the performance of his or her respective duties; or where the dog is working as a hunting dog, herding dog, farm or ranch dog, or predator control dog on the property of or under the control of the dog's owner.
CO - Disaster - Part 6. Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act C. R. S. A. § 25-1.5-601 - 613 (formerly C. R. S. A. § 12-29.3-101 to 113) The Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act applies to registered volunteer health practitioners and who provide health or veterinary services for a host entity during an emergency.
CO - Dangerous dogs - DECRETO 380 DE 2022 DECRETO 380 DE 2022 This decree adds Chapter 10 to Title 8 of Decree 1070, 2015 (Regulatory Decree of the Defense Administrative Sector). It regulates the civil liability of owners or keepers of "special management dogs." Owners and keepers must acquire liability insurance and dogs in this category must be microchipped.
CO - Dangerous Dog- Article 9. Offenses Against Public Peace, Order, and Decency. C. R. S. A. § 18-9-204.5; C. R. S. A. § 35-42-115 This Colorado statute defines a "dangerous dog" as one that has inflicted bodily or serious bodily injury upon or has caused the death of a person or domestic animal; or has demonstrated tendencies that would cause a reasonable person to believe that the dog may inflict injury upon or cause the death of any person or domestic animal; or has engaged in or been trained for animal fighting as described by statute. Owners found guilty under the provisions will be subject to misdemeanor penalties if their dogs cause bodily injury or felonies if their dogs cause the death of a person. Section 35-42-115 mandates that the bureau create a a statewide dangerous dog registry consisting of a database of information concerning microchip types and placement by veterinarians and licensed shelters in dangerous dogs.
CO - Cruelty, reporting - § 19-3-304. Persons required to report child abuse or neglect C. R. S. A. § 19-3-304 This Colorado statute relates to mandatory reporting for child abuse or neglect. With respect to animal-related issues, the statute requires veterinarians, officers and agents of the state bureau of animal protection, and animal control officers to report suspected abuse or neglect as described in the law.
CO - Cruelty - Decreto 497 Decreto 497 Decreto 497, regulates Ley 5, 1972. Article 3 lists acts constituting bad treatment towards animals, such as keeping animals in places that are unsanitary or that prevent them from breathing, moving, or resting or which deprives them of air or light; forcing animals to work excessively or beyond their strength or to any act that results in suffering in order to obtain from the efforts that cannot reasonably be required of them except by the means of punishment; abandoning the injured, sick, exhausted or mutilated animal, or stop providing everything that can be humanely provided, including veterinary assistance; not giving an animal a quick death free of prolonged suffering, regardless of whether the animal will be used for human consumption; confining animals in such a number that it is not possible for them to move freely, or leave them without water and food for more than 12 hours; keeping animals confined with others that terrify or annoy them; and skinning or plucking live animals.
CO - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty/Animal Fighting Statutes C. R. S. A. § 18-9-201 - 209; § 35-42-101 - 115 This Colorado section contains the anti-cruelty and animal fighting laws. A person commits cruelty to animals if he or she knowingly, recklessly, or with criminal negligence overdrives, overloads, overworks, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, unnecessarily or cruelly beats, allows to be housed in a manner that results in chronic or repeated serious physical harm, carries or confines in or upon any vehicles in a cruel or reckless manner, or otherwise mistreats or neglects any animal. A person commits aggravated cruelty to animals if he or she knowingly tortures, needlessly mutilates, or needlessly kills an animal. Cruelty to animals is a class 1 misdemeanor and aggravated cruelty or a second conviction of animal cruelty is class 6 felony. This section also prohibits animal fighting (not limited to certain species such as dogs or chickens). Violation of this law results in a class 5 felony. This section also makes it illegal to own a dangerous dog and "tamper" with livestock.
CO - Assistance Animals - Colorado Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws C. R. S. A. § 12-240-144; § 12-245-229; § 12-255-133; § 18-13-107, § 18-13-107.3, § 18-13-107.7; § 18-9-202; § 18-1.3-602; § 24-34-301; § 24-34-309; § 24-34-801 - 804; § 40-9-109; § 42-4-808 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and service animal laws.
CO - Animal welfare - Ley 1955 Ley 1955 “The National Development Plan for 2018-2022,” in article 324, instructs the national government to draft the national policy and guidelines for the protection and welfare of farm animals, stray animals, and animals subject to cruelty, among others. It instructs the government to define strategies, programs, and to propose laws for animal protection on issues such as responsible ownership, sterilization campaigns, the creation of welfare centers, rehabilitation and integral assistance to domestic and wild animals, the progressive substitution of vehicles of animal traction, and the strengthening of investigation and prosecution procedures for crimes against animals with the purpose of eradicating all forms of animal violence, cruelty, illegal traffic, and trade.
CO - Animal welfare - Ley 1801 de 2016 Ley 1801 de 2016 Ley 1801 of 2016, or “National Code of Safety and Citizen Coexistence.” Title XIII is titled “of the relationship with animals.” chapter one talks about the respect and care owed to animals, prohibiting behaviors that negatively affect animals, such as the promotion, participation, or sponsorship of betting activities involving animals; the sale of domestic animals on public roads; the wandering of animals on the streets; and the use of captive animals as shooting targets. Chapter II “Domestic animals or pets,” establishes that only species authorized by the law can be kept as pets. The ownership of wild animals as pets is prohibited. Services animals accompanying their owners are always allowed in public spaces. Dog fighting is prohibited in the entire territory. Chapter IV regulates the management and ownership of potentially dangerous dogs, tort liability, the registry of potentially dangerous dogs.
CO - Animal control - Ley 769 Ley 769 This law is Colombia's National Code of Traffic. Article 97 delegates to the territorial entities the duty to create municipal shelters ("cosos municipales" or animal deposits") adequate for the keeping of animals of minor species, major species, and wildlife.
CO - Animal control - Ley 2054 de 2020 Ley 2054 de 2020 This law modifies Law 1801 of 2016. It imposes the duty on all districts or municipalities to establish an animal welfare center, municipal shelters, or transitory homes to take domestic animals to the extent possible according to the financial capacities of the territorial entities. If the district or municipality does not have these centers, it must support the efforts of private animal shelters or foundations that receive domestic animals. If the animal has not been claimed by his or her owner or keeper after thirty days, the animal will be declared abandoned, and the authorities will proceed to promote his or her adoption. This law also establishes that domestic animals or pets cannot be restricted from common areas in apartment buildings. Dogs have to be leashed, and in the case of potentially dangerous dogs, they have to be muzzled, and the owner must have the corresponding license in accordance with the law.
CL - Transport, animals - Decreto 30 Decreto 30 This "Decreto" or executive order contains welfare standards for animals during transport. It is an indirect result of the agreement DS N° 28/2003 between Chile and the European Union together with decretos 28, and 29, 2013. Under this decreto, cattle cannot be transported in conditions that could cause unnecessary pain and suffering. However, there are no limitations regarding the number of animals that can be loaded, and animals can be transported without food, water, and rest for up to 24 hours. if it is impossible to unload the animals, the carrier must ensure that animals are provided food and water.
CL - Slaughter - Ley 21.3016 Ley 21.3016 This law modifies Law No. 19.162, increasing sanctions for violations of animal health regulations in slaughterhouses, and information falsification in the livestock and meat traceability system. This law increases monetary fees from 100 monthly tax units (UTM) to 500 UTM. In addition it adds a paragraph to artiicle 8 of Law No. 19.162 stating the following: "The person who, in an export process, incurs violations of this law related to animal health or traceability will be sanctioned with a fine of 100 to 1,000 monthly tax units and with the confiscation of the products. Additionally, they will be sanctioned with the prohibition of export between three to five years. In case of recidivism within the five years following the end of the prohibition, the conduct will be sanctioned with the perpetual prohibition to export. In the case of a legal person, the same sanction will fall on the natural person or persons controlling the said company and the other companies they control."
CL - Marine mammals - Ley 20293 Ley 20293 The cetacean law prohibits the killing, hunting, capturing, harassing, keeping, possessing, transporting, disembarking, preparing, or carrying out any transformation process, as well as the commercialization or storage of any species of cetacean that inhabits or crosses the maritime areas of national sovereignty and jurisdiction in Chile.
CL - Cruelty - Ley 20.380 Ley 20.380 The animal protection statute applies to all animals and strengthens the penalties established in the criminal code for animal cruelty. Under this statute, animals are sentient living beings, that are part of nature. They must be treated respectfully and unnecessary pain must be avoided. Every person that owns an animal must provide food and shelter that is adequate to their minimum needs, and must not restrict their freedom of movement in an unnecessary manner. This is true especially if it causes suffering or if it alters the normal development of the animal. Some important aspects of this law include the establishment of the duty to teach children in schools to protect and respect animals. It prohibits animal experimentation in schools and regulates the production of livestock (confinement, breeding, transport, and slaughter). The livestock service (SAG) oversees the compliance of this law during the production of livestock, and the handling of animals by zoos, circuses, and veterinary centers. However, violations of the dispositions of this law carry out monetary fines only.
China - Wildlife - Wildlife Law Regulations Wildlife Law Regs.

This is the set of regulations for the implementation of the national wildlife law, primarily for the protection of endangered species.

China - Wildlife - China Protection of Wildlife Order No. 9 (1989)

This law seeks to protect national list and international list of endangered species.

China - Fishing - China Fisheries Law Order No. 34 (1986)

Although old, it remains the law for fishing in China " for the purpose of enhancing the protection, increase, development and reasonable utilization of fishery resources, developing artificial cultivation, protecting fishery workers' lawful rights and interests and boosting fishery production, so as to meet the requirements of socialist construction and the needs of the people."

Chile - Animal Welfare- Animal Protection Act (in Spanish) Ley Nº 20.380 - Ley sobre protección de animales. Ley 20.380 is the is the Chilean Animal Protection Statute. It recognizes animals as living beings and establishes the norms for the “recognition, protection and respect of animals” in order to avoid unnecessary pain and suffering. This law punishes animal cruelty with imprisonment of up to 3 years. Labs, zoos, circuses, and other establishments that keep animals for exhibition and entertainment are allowed, so long as they have the adequate facilities according to the species and adequate safety for people. Animal experimentation in schools is allowed under this law. Rodeo, rein-back and equestrian sports are excepted from provisions of this law.
Canada - Yukon Statutes. Animal Protection Act R.S.Y. 2002, c. 6, s. 1 - 14 This set of laws comprises the Yukon, Canada Animal Protection Act. The Act provides that no person shall cause or allow an animal to be in distress. Any person who contravenes this Act is guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine of not more than $500 and, in default of payment, to imprisonment up to six months, or to both fine and imprisonment. A judge may also prohibit a person convicted of an offence under the Act from owning an animal or from having charge of an animal for any specified time period. The Act also outlines the power of peace officers to seize animals in distress as well as those powers of humane societies to provide care for such animals.
Canada - Yukon Statutes - Dog Act R.S.Y. 2002, c. 59 This set of laws comprises the Yukon Dog Act. The law provides that an owner must keep his or her dog fed and watered and not punish it to an extent that is cruel or unnecessary. Dogs found at large contrary to the Act are impounded for a period of five days for owners to reclaim them. The Act also states that a person may kill a dog that is running at large in the act of pursuing, worrying, injuring or destroying cattle, horses, sheep, pigs or poultry.
Canada - Saskatchewan - The Animal Protection Act Chapter A-21.2 of the Statutes of Saskatchewan, 2018 This set of laws comprises the Saskatchewan Animal Protection Act, which was amended in 2018. Under the Act, no person responsible for an animal shall cause or permit the animal to be or to continue to be in distress. An animal can be in distress if it is deprived of sufficient food, water, shelter, or veterinary care/medical attention, or kept in unsafe or unsanitary conditions, among other things. The Act also outlines the powers of humane societies to rescue animals in distress and then sell, give away, or euthanize such animals if the owners cannot be located. A person who contravenes the Act is guilty of an offence with a fine of not more than $25,000, to imprisonment for not more than two years or to both for a first offence. Further, in addition to any other penalty imposed, if a person responsible for an animal is found guilty, the court may make an order prohibiting that person from owning or having custody or control of any animal for a period specified by the court. Part 3 (sections 28 to 31) of the Act outlines the provisions relating to damage or injury done by dogs and Part 4 (sections 32 to 34) deals with protections for service animals.
Canada - Saskatchewan - Northern Municipailities Act (dangerous animal) 2010, c.N-5.2, s.395; 2018, c A-21.2, s.40. Saskatchewan's The Municipalities Act, The Cities Act and The Northern Municipalities Act, 2010 provide the basic legislative framework for all of the province's municipalities, and give municipalities what is referred to as "Natural Persons Power." This term is commonly understood to mean that municipalities possess all of the same powers that a normal person would. Essentially, a municipality can take any action that a natural person or business could to carry out its purposes unless or until legislation prohibits an action or places limitations or conditions on an action. Northern municipalities have specific authority to declare any animal or class or classes of animal to be dangerous. Legislative provisions within The Northern Municipalities Act, 2010 respecting dangerous dogs may meet local needs.
Canada - Saskatchewan - Dangerous Dog Law SS 2005, c M-36.1, 374-380 This set of Saskatchewan, Canada laws comprises the Dangerous Dog laws.
Canada - Saskatchewan - Dangerous Animals S.S. 2005, c. M-36.1, s. 374 - 380 This set of laws comprises the Saskatchewan, Canada dangerous animal laws. Under the Act, any person who owns an animal for the purpose of fighting, or trains, torments, badgers, baits or otherwise uses an animal for the purpose of causing or encouraging the animal to make unprovoked attacks on persons or domestic animals is guilty of an offence. In addition, a peace officer or designated officer may destroy any animal that he or she finds injuring or viciously attacking a person or a domestic animal. The Act outlines the actions that result in an animal being declared dangerous (i.e., chased a person in a vicious or threatening manner, bit a person or domestic animal without provocation, etc.) and the procedure to declare such an animal dangerous.
Canada - P.E.I. Statutes. Dog Act R.S.P.E.I. 1988, c. D-13 s.1 - 21

This set of laws comprises the Prince Edward Island (PEI) Dog Act. The Act provides that no owner of a dog shall allow his dog to run at large; any dog found at large shall be deemed to have been allowed to be at large by its owner. In addition, the owner of livestock or any enforcement officer authorized by the owner of livestock, may kill a dog that is killing or injuring the owner's livestock, except where the livestock is on property held under lease, license or permit by the owner of the dog. This Act also outlines licensing requirements for dogs as well as impoundment procedures.

Canada - P.E.I. Statutes - Companion Animal Protection Act CHAPTER A-11.2 This set of laws comprises the Prince Edward Island (PEI) Companion Animal Protection Act. The act outlines the duties of animal owners including a duty to provide animals with adequate food, water, and shelter and access to veterinary care when injured or ill. Further, under the act, no person shall torture an animal or inflict on or cause unnecessary pain or suffering to an animal. Additionally, no person shall perform, or permit to be performed, cosmetic surgery on an animal unless medically necessary (as defined). No person shall operate a companion animal retail store unless the person holds a license issued by the Director for that purpose. The disposition of seized animals is described in the law as well as appointment of humane agents. A person found to be violating the act is subject to a fine of not less than $500 and not more than $10,000, and/or imprisonment for a term of not more than six months, with increasing fines and incarceration terms for subsequent offences.

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