Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
NJ - Horse - 39:4-15. Sleigh bells on horses attached to a sleigh N.J.S.A. 39:4-15 This New Jersey law states that no person shall drive a horse attached to a sleigh or sled on a highway unless there are a sufficient number of bells attached to the horse's harness to give warning of its approach.
NJ - Fur - Unlawful Trapping (Article 2. Manner, Means and Times of Hunting) NJSA 23:4-20 to 23:22.8 This set of New Jersey laws describes what constitutes "unlawful trapping." The section prohibits pole traps with a fine of $20 for each pole trap illegally used. Further, the law states that no person shall manufacture, sell, offer for sale, possess, import, transport or use an animal trap of the steel-jaw leghold type. A person using a steel-jaw leghold type animal trap shall be fined not less than $50.00 nor more than $250.00 for a first offense; not less than $250.00 nor more than $500.00 for a second offense; not less than $500.00 nor more than $2,500.00 for a third or subsequent offense.
NJ - Fur - Chapter 14. Fur Products. NJSA 56:14-1 to 56:14-3 This law represents New Jersey's fur labeling law. Under the 2009 law, no person shall sell or offer to sell any new coat, jacket, garment or other clothing apparel made wholly or in part of fur, regardless of the price or value of the fur, without the name of the animal(s) used to produce the fur and the name of the country of origin of any imported fur. A person who violates this act shall be subject to a penalty of not more than $500 for the first offense and not more than $1,000 for each subsequent offense, to be collected in a civil action by a summary proceeding.
NJ - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 15. Equestrian Activities. NJSA 5:15-1 to 5:15-1 12 This New Jersey equine activity liability statute fist begins by setting forth the legislative recognition of the importance of equine activities to the state and the fact that eliminating the inherent risks in engaging in them is impractical or impossible. Further, a participant and spectator are deemed to assume the inherent risks of equine animal activities created by equine animals, and is assumed to know the range of his ability and it shall be the duty of each participant to conduct himself within the limits of such ability. This acknowledgment of the assumption of risk serves as a complete bar of suit and shall serve as a complete defense to a suit against an operator by a participant for injuries resulting from the assumed risks (excluding the exceptions outlined in the statute).
NJ - Endangered - Chapter 2A. Wildlife Generally NJSA 23:2A-1 to 23:2A-1:16 These statutes comprise the New Jersey Endangered and Nongame Species Conservation Act. The definitions used in the Act are described as well as the rules for listing species, the powers and duties of the supervising department, and the designation of funding.  Under the statute, violation of the Act incurs a civil penalty of $250-5,000. In 2014, provisions were added for the prohibition on import, sale, or purchase of ivory products. In 2018, a law was added that prohibits a person from using a wild or exotic animal in a traveling animal act.
NJ - Education - 18A:35-4.25. Right of pupil to refuse participation in dissection activities N.J.S.A. 18A:35-4.25 This New Jersey law allows a public school pupil from kindergarten through grade 12 to refuse to dissect, vivisect, incubate, capture or otherwise harm or destroy animals or any parts thereof as part of a course of instruction. The school must notify pupils and parents at the beginning of each school on the right to decline participation. Any pupil who chooses to refrain from participation in or observation shall be offered an alternative education project for the purpose of providing the pupil with the factual knowledge, information or experience required by the course of study. A pupil shall not be discriminated against, in grading or in any other manner, based upon a decision to exercise the rights of this act.
NJ - Domestic Violence - Chapter 25. Domestic Violence N. J. S. A. 2C:25-26, 27,28, 29 On January 17, 2012, Governor Christie signed the Domestic Violence Pet Protection Law . The law authorizes courts to include pets in domestic violence restraining orders. The court is allowed to enter an order " . . . directing the possession of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either party or a minor child residing in the household. Where a person has abused or threatened to abuse such animal, there shall be a presumption that possession of the animal shall be awarded to the non-abusive party." This is listed in N. J. S. A. 2C:25-29(b)(19). Other sections are provided for definitions and background to section 29.
NJ - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N. J. S. A. 2A:42-101 to 2A:42-113; 2C:29-3.1; 4:19-1 to 4:19-43; 4:19A-1 - 17; 4:21B-1 - 3; 4:22A-1 to 13; 23:4-25, 26, 46; 26:4-78 - 95; 40:48-1; 54:4-83 These statutes comprise New Jersey's dog laws. Among the provisions include laws regarding domesticated animals in housing projects, rabies control laws, licensing requirements, and dangerous dog laws.
NJ - Dog - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJSA 4:19-15.1 to 4:19-15.33 These New Jersey statutes comprise the laws for licensing, impounding, appointment of animal control officers, and kennel/pet shop regulations. It also includes a provision that prohibits impounded animals from being sold or donated for experimentation, as well as pet sterilization provisions.
NJ - Dog Bite - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by N. J. S. A. 4:19-16 This New Jersey statute provides that the owner of any dog that bites a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.
NJ - Disaster - Article 6. Emergency Powers of Governor N. J. S. A. App. A:9-43.1 - 2 In New Jersey, the State Office of Emergency Management, and each county and municipality, is directed to adopt a emergency operations plans that include provisions to support the needs of animals and individuals with an animal under their care, including a service animal, in a major disaster or emergency.
NJ - Disaster - App. A:9-43.15. Emergency evacuation; boarding of public transportation or public transportation service with domestic companion animal N.J.S.A. App. A:9-43.15 This New Jersey law states that in the event that a state of emergency has been declared and an evacuation of any region of the State is in progress, the owner of a domestic companion animal shall be permitted to board any public transportation or public transportation service with the domestic companion animal so long as that animal is under the owner's control by use of a leash or tether, or is properly confined in an appropriate container or by other suitable means, provided that such boarding is authorized by and consistent with the provisions of the State Emergency Operations Plan. Additionally, all passengers with service animals shall be given priority seating on all means of transportation.
NJ - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes NJSA 4:22-10 to 4:22-60; NJSA 2C:33-31 - 32 These New Jersey statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty provisions. According to the definitional section, "animal" or "creature" includes the whole brute creation. Exclusions under the act include state regulated scientific experiments, state sanctioned killing of animals, hunting of game, training of dogs, normal livestock operations, and the killing of rats and mice. With regard to livestock practices, no person may be cited or arrested for a first offense involving a minor or incidental violation of any provision of this title involving alleged cruelty to domestic livestock unless that person has first been issued a written warning.
NJ - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N.J.S.A. 2A:42-109; 10:5-5; 10:5-29.1 - 11; 39:4-37.1; 27:25-5b; 48:3-33; App. A:9-43.2; 2C:29-3.1, 3.2; 48:3-33; 18A:46-13.3; 36:2-213 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
Nigeria - Endangered Species - Endangered Species Act (in English) Decree No. 11 of 1985 The hunting or capture of or trade in animal species listed in the First Schedule to this Act is absolutely prohibited. Furthermore, no person shall hunt, capture, trade in or otherwise deal with an animal species specified in the Second Schedule to this Act except if that person is in possession of a license issued under this Act. The act also sets out the conditions of licenses and permits. The Minister may by an order publish in the Federal Gazette alter the list of animals specified in the First or Second Schedule to this Act by way of addition, substitution or deletion or otherwise. Penalties for violations are also provided.
NH - Wolf - Chapter 207. General Provisions as to Fish and Game. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 207:61 This New Hampshire statute prohibits the introduction of wolf populations into the state by a person or state agency.
NH - Wildlife Damage - Wildlife Damage Control N.H. Rev. Stat. § 207:22 to 207:30 These New Hampshire statutes establish a wildlife damages control program to respond to conflicts between wildlife and people. A person who suffers loss or damage to livestock, bees, orchards or growing crops, by bear or mountain lion, may receive compensation from the state. The statutes allow a person to kill any unprotected bird or wild animal doing damage to poultry, crops, domestic animals on the person's property.
NH - Veterinary - Chapter 332-B. New Hampshire Veterinary Practice Act. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 332-B:1 - 332-B:20 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
NH - Trusts - Chapter 564-B. Uniform Trust Code. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 564-B:4-408 This statute represents New Hampshire's pet trust law. The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
NH - Ordinances - 466:30-b Referendum (muzzling and restraining dogs) N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:30-b This New Hampshire statute outlines the required referendum format if a town seeks to adopt an ordinance that prohibits the running at large of dogs. Towns that do not adopt this statutory format may regulate the running at large of dogs by enacting ordinances that comply with other statutes.
NH - Lien - 448:2-a Lien for Food and Care N.H. Rev. Stat. § 448:2-a Any person or carrier who transports animals shall have a lien upon such animals for food, care, and custody furnished, and is not liable for their detention.
NH - Licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:29 This New Hampshire statute provides that, in the case of a rabies epidemic, the mayor and aldermen of a city or the selectmen of a town may order that all dogs within the limits of the city or town shall be muzzled or restrained from running at large during the time prescribed by such order. Any offending dog may be impounded.
NH - Licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:30-a This New Hampshire law provides that it is unlawful for any dog to run at large. "At large" is defined as "off the premises of the owner or keeper and not under the control of any person by means of personal presence and attention as will reasonably control the conduct of such dog, unless accompanied by the owner or custodian." Any authorized person may seize such at large dogs.
NH - Kennel - CHAPTER 466. DOGS AND CATS. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:6 This New Hampshire statute outlines the provisions of dog group licenses (i.e., kennel licenses).
NH - Impound - Chapter 436. Diseases of Domestic Animals. Rabies Control. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 436:107 This New Hampshire statute provides that the local rabies control authority shall establish and maintain a pound. Any dog found off the owner's premises and not wearing a valid vaccination tag shall be impounded and maintained at the pound for a minimum of 7 days unless reclaimed earlier by the owner. Notice of impoundment of all dogs, including any significant marks of identification, shall be posted at the pound as public notification of impoundment. If the dog is unclaimed at the end of 7 days, the rabies control authority may dispose of the dog in accordance with applicable laws or rules.
NH - Hunting, Internet - § 207:8-a. Remote Control or Internet Hunting Prohibited N.H. Rev. Stat. § 207:8-a This statute prohibits engaging in internet hunting or assisting another person in internet hunting within the state of New Hampshire. Any person who violates this section is guilty of a class A misdemeanor if a natural person and guilty of a felony if any other person. In addition, the executive director may impose a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 for each violation of this section.
NH - Hunting - Interference with Hunting, Trapping or Fishing. 207:57 Harassment. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 207:57 This represents New Hampshire's hunter harassment law. The law provides that no person shall purposely obstruct or impede the participation of any individual in the lawful activity of hunting, fishing or trapping while that individual is in a designated hunting area on public lands. The section does not apply to any incidental interference arising from the lawful and normal activities of public land users. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a violation.
NH - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 427. Livestock and Meat Inspection. Humane Slaughter N.H. Rev. Stat. § 427:33 - 427:37 These laws comprise New Hampshire's humane slaughter provisions. A humane method is defined as one where the animal is rendered insensible to pain by a single blow or shot of a mechanical instrument or by electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective, before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast, or cut. Ritual slaughter required by the ritual of the Jewish faith, whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain is also allowed. Any slaughterer who violates this subdivision shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.
NH - Housing, pets - Chapter 161-F. Elderly and Adult Services. Companion Animals N.H. Rev. Stat. § 161-F:30 - 33 This New Hampshire chapter relates to the keeping of pets in housing for the elderly. Under the chapter, "animals” means common domesticated household animals limited to: dogs, cats, caged birds, and aquarium fish. Tenants of any housing for the elderly project can petition to keep companion animals. The petition is determined by a simple majority vote of 10 percent of all tenants. Other provisions include the establishment of a reasonable damage deposit and a responsibility by the tenant to provide management with an agreement that allows someone else to act as a temporary or permanent caretaker if he or she becomes unable to do so.
NH - Exotic Pets, Wildlife - Chapter 207. Import, Possession, or Release of Wildlife. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 207:14 - 207:15-a This New Hampshire section states that no person shall import, possess, sell, exhibit, or release any live marine species or wildlife, or the eggs or progeny thereof, without first obtaining a permit from the executive director except as otherwise permitted. The executive director has the authority to determine the time period and any other conditions governing the issuance of such permit. The executive director may refuse to issue a permit if he determines that such issuance may pose significant disease, genetic, ecological, environmental, health, safety, or welfare risks to persons, marine species or wildlife. Any wildlife release or imported contrary to these provisions are subject to seizure.
NH - Exotic Pets - Chapter 466-A. Wolf Hybrids N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466-A:1 to 466-A:6 This section of laws comprises New Hampshire's wolf-dog hybrid act. Under the law, no person shall sell or resell, offer for sale or resale, or release or cause to be released a wolf hybrid in the state of New Hampshire. A person may temporarily import a wolf hybrid provided that he or she shows proof of spaying or neutering and has accurate vaccination records. Each wolf hybrid shall be under the physical control of the owner or confined in an enclosure or structure sufficient to prohibit escape. Any person in violation of this chapter or any rule adopted under this chapter shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor.
NH - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 508. Limitation of Actions. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 508:19 This New Hampshire statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person engaged in an equine activity, shall not be liable for an injury or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant. The statute also sets out several definitions and specifically states that the term "engages in an equine activity" does not include being a spectator at an equine activity, except in cases where the spectator is in an unauthorized area and in immediate proximity to the equine activity.
NH - Endangered - Chapter 212-A. Endangered Species Conservation Act N.H. Rev. Stat. § 212-A:1 to 212-A:15 These New Hampshire statutes outline the Endangered Species Conservation Act. The definitions of the terms used in the Act are described especially with regard to what constitutes endangered and threatened species. Violation of the Act is accomplished by taking a protected species and incurs a misdemeanor penalty.
NH - Ecoterrorism - 644:8-e Willful Interference With Organizations or Projects Involving Animals N.H. Rev. Stat. § 644:8-e This law is New Hampshire's eco/agroterrorism law. The law states that whoever willfully causes bodily injury or willfully interferes with any property, including animals or records, used by any organization or project involving animals, or with any animal facility shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor. Whoever in the course of a violation of paragraph I causes serious bodily injury to another individual or economic loss in excess of $10,000 shall be guilty of a class B felony.
NH - Eagle, Golden - Chapter 209. Game Birds; Pigeons. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 209:1 - 209:13 New Hampshire prohibits the hunting, capturing, killing, or possession of any bald or golden eagle or disturbing eagle nests and young.
NH - Domestic Violence - Chapter 173-B. Protection of Persons from Domestic Violence N.H. Rev. Stat. § 173-B:1, 173:B4, 173:B5 New Hampshire now considers animal cruelty to be “abuse” under its protection of persons from domestic violence statute. The law now allows a judge to grant the petitioner of a protective order exclusive care, custody, or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by the victim, the abuser, or a minor child in the household; the law also allows a judge to order the abuser to stay away from the pet in both temporary and final domestic violence protective orders.
NH - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 3:25; § 4:13-s; § 466:1 - 466:54; 47:17; 207:11 - 207:13b; 210:18; 264:31; 436:99 - 436:109; 437:1 - 437:22; 437-A:1 - 9; 508:18-a; § 644:8-f These New Hampshire statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, dangerous dog laws, and the rabies control code.
NH - Dog Bite - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:31 to 31-a Under this section, a dog is considered to be a nuisance, a menace, or vicious to persons or to property if it is "at large," if it barks for sustained periods, if it chases cars continuously, or if it growls, snaps at or bites persons. If a dog bites a person and breaks the skin, the animal control officer must inform the victim whether the dog was vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours.
NH - Divorce - 458:16-a Property Settlement. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 458:16-a This New Hampshire statute defines "property" for purposes of the state's marriage dissolution (divorce) procedure. In August of 2019, a new provision was added to this law related to animals (Subsection II-a). This subsection states that "[t]angible property shall include animals. In such cases, the property settlement shall address the care and ownership of the parties' animals, taking into consideration the animals' wellbeing."
NH - Disaster - Chapter 21-P. Department of Safety. Homeland Security and Emergency Management. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 21-P:37-a In New Hampshire, state policy mandates that service animals and the people they serve be kept together in cases of emergency. State emergency planning and training must take that requirement into account.
NH - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 644:8 - 644:8-g These New Hampshire statutes provide the animals anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions for the state. Included are general anti-cruelty laws for any animal (including domestic and wild animals), exhibitions of fighting animals, provisions for protection of animals riding in motor vehicles, restrictions related to docking the tail of a horse, provisions for the use of animals in science classes or fairs, laws against maiming or willfully interfering with police dogs or horses, laws related to the willful interference with organizations or projects involving animals, and provisions related to dogs riding in pick-up trucks.
NH - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 5:15-b; § 21-P:37-a; 167-D:1 - 10; 265:41-a; § 376-A:15 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NH - Agricultural Animals - Chapter 435. Animal Care, Breeding and Feed N.H. Rev. Stat. § 435:1 - 435:41 This New Hampshire chapter concerns the registration of breeding stallions and the proper care, feeding, and shelter of horses. The chapter also includes the New Hampshire Commercial Feed Law of 1971. Within this law are prohibitions on the misbranding or adulteration of commercial feed. The chapter additionally prohibits the feeding of raw garbage to swine.
New Zealand - Animal Welfare - Code for Layer Hens 2012 This code sets the minimum standards for the care and management of layer hens under all forms of management used in New Zealand. The purpose of this code is to provide guidance to the owners of layer hens and to persons who are in charge of them about the standards they must achieve in order to meet their obligations under the Animal Welfare Act 1999.
New Zealand - Animal Welfare - Code for Layer Hens 1999 Code of Animal Welfare No. 18 In New Zealand, hens are kept under conditions ranging from large commercial enterprises where the birds are totally reliant on humans for all their daily requirements to free-ranging hens which have access to outdoor runs or pasture. Provided those concerned with the day-to-day care of the hens treat them with skill and consideration, their welfare can be safeguarded under a variety of management systems. The code takes account of five basic requirements: freedom from thirst, hunger and malnutrition, the provision of appropriate comfort and shelter, the prevention, or rapid diagnosis and treatment, of injury, disease or infection, freedom from distress, and the ability to display normal patterns of behavior.
New York Revised Statutes 1874: Chapter 12: Sections 1-8 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 12, §§ 1-8 (1874) Chapter 12, entitled "An act relating to animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1874.
New York Revised Statutes 1867: Chapter 375: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 375, §§ 1-10 (1867) Chapter 375, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's law on animal treatment for 1867.
New York Revised Statutes 1866: Chapter 783: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 783, §§ 1-10 (1866) Chapter 783, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's Law on animal treatment for 1866.
New York Revised Statutes 1829: Title 6: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. stat. tit. 6, 26 (1829) The law contained in Title 6, Section 26 of the New York Revised Statutes of 1829 concerns the offense of maliciously killing an animal of another. The statute describes the type of animals covered and the punishment for killing, wounding, or maiming such an animal. In addition, the statute also states the punishment for the offense of cruelty to animals.
New York Revised Statute 1881: Chapter 682: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 682, § 26 (1881) Section 26 of Chapter 682 from New York Revised Statutes 1881 concerns the treatment of animals by the owner or any other person. A person found harming such an animal would be guilty of a misdemeanor.

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