Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.43301 - 43303 These sections place limitations on acreage held for sporting purposes and on acreage within 2 miles of other lands held for sporting purposes.
MI - Hunting, Internet - 750.236a. Engaging in, providing or operating facilities for, or providing or offering to provide equipment M. C. L. A. 750.236a, 236b, 236c A person in Michigan is not allowed to: (1) engage in computer-assisted shooting; provide or operate, with or without remuneration, facilities for computer-assisted shooting; or (3) provide or offer to provide, with or without remuneration, equipment specially adapted for computer-assisted shooting. Violation is a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.
MI - Hunting/Recreational Trespass - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.73101 - 73302 These sections describe the Department of Natural Resources ability to enforce and prosecute persons who enter upon the land of another, who remove or destroy signs or posters or enclose someone else's land without permission. These sections also describe the potential liability of landowners.
MI - Impound - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Use of Dogs and Cats for Research. MCL 287.388 This Michigan statute provides that a dealer, a county, city, village, or township operating a dog pound or animal shelter shall not sell or otherwise dispose of a dog or cat within 4 days after its acquisition. If the dog or cat has a collar, license, or other evidence of ownership, the operator of the pound or shelter shall notify the owner in writing and disposition of the animal shall not be made within 7 days from the date of mailing the notice.
MI - Initiatives - Michigan Proposal 3 (mourning dove hunting) 2006 Michigan Proposal 3

In 2006, Michigan voters were presented with Proposal 3 that would have legalized the hunting of mourning doves by adding the species to the state game list. The measure was defeated by a 69 to 31 percent vote.

MI - Initiatives - Proposal 14-1, Keep Michigan Wolves Protected Proposal 14-1 (2014)

This proposal for 2014 is a referendum of Public Act 520 of 2012, which authorizes the establishment of the first open hunting season for wolves. It will appear on the November 4, 2014 ballot. The measure will UPHOLD Public Act 520, which allows the authorization of wolf hunting seasons in Michigan. In Michigan, a "Yes" vote on a veto referendum upholds the law and a "No" vote rejects the law. As a result, the referendum's supporters are campaigning for a "No" vote.

MI - Initiatives - Proposal 14-2, A REFERENDUM OF PUBLIC ACT 520 OF 2012, ESTABLISHING A HUNTING SEASON FOR WOLVES AND AUTHORIZING ANNUAL WOLF HUNTING SEASONS Proposal 14-2 (2014)

This is the second wolf-related ballot measure for the November 4, 2014 election that also operates as a veto referendum. If the proposal is approved, it would uphold Public Act 21 of 2013, which authorizes the Natural Resources Commission to directly designate game species (including wolves) and determine hunting seasons. In Michigan, a "Yes" vote on a veto referendum upholds the law and a "No" vote rejects the law. As a result, the referendum's supporters are campaigning for a "No" vote.

MI - Leash - 287.262. Licensing and control of dogs; hunting dogs; female dogs in heat; straying dogs M. C. L. A. 287.262 This section of the Dog Law of 1919 provides that any dog over six months must be registered and wear a collar at all times. It also mandates that female dogs in heat must be kept on their owners' premises or restrained on a leash. The overall leash requirement is less clear, stating that it is unlawful for an owner to allow a dog "to stray unless held properly in leash." This does appear to mandate a statewide leash requirement for dogs.
MI - Lien - 570.185. Lien of mechanic, artisan, or tradesman for manufacture of goods or keeping or care of animals M.C.L.A. 570.185 This Michigan law states that when a person delivers any horse, mule, neat cattle, sheep, or swine to be kept or cared for to another person, that person shall have a lien thereon for the keeping and care of such animals, and may retain possession of the same until such charges are paid.
MI - Livestock - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Animal Industry Act M. C. L. A. 287.701 - 747 This Michigan act is known as the "Animal Industry Act." The act is intended to protect the health, safety, and welfare of humans and animals, by requiring disease testing of imported animals, certification, and reporting of infected animals. A newly amended section (287.746) also concerns the tethering or confinement of animals such as pregnant sows and veal calves in manners that restrict lying, standing, fully extending limbs, or turning freely.
MI - Lost Property - Chapter 434. Lost and Unclaimed Property. Lost Property. M. C. L. A. 434.21 - 29 This section comprises Michigan's Lost Property statutes.
MI - Natural Resources -Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. Natural Resources and Environmental Pro MCL 324.1101 -1102 These sections describe the ability of courts and the Commission to review the Department of Natural Resources decisions and the ability for the public to circulate and sign petitions.
MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.289a This Michigan law provides that a board of county commissioners may establish, by ordinance, an animal control agency. The animal control agency shall have jurisdiction to enforce this act in any city, village or township which does not have an animal control ordinance. The county's animal control ordinance shall provide for animal control programs, facilities, personnel and necessary expenses incurred in animal control.
MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.290 This Michigan statute enables a city, village or township to adopt an animal control ordinance to regulate the licensing, payment of claims and providing for the enforcement thereof.
MI - Ordinances - Chapters 81 to 113 Fourth Class Cities. M. C. L. A. 91.1 This Michigan statute provides that a city incorporated under the provisions of this act has, and the council may pass ordinances relating to, the following general powers: To provide for the issuing of licenses to the owners and keepers of dogs and to require the owners and keepers of dogs to pay for and obtain such licenses; and to regulate and prevent the running at large of dogs, to require dogs to be muzzled, and to authorize the killing of dogs running at large or not licensed in violation of an ordinance of the city.
MI - Pet Trusts - Chapter 700. Estates and Protected Individuals Code. Estates and Protected Individuals Code. M. C. L. A. 700.2722 This Michigan statute provides that a trust for the care of a designated domestic or pet animal is valid (these trusts follow the terms for non-charitable trusts and thus, can be of a duration of up to 21 years). The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust. Extrinsic evidence is admissible to prove the transferor's intent and the court may reduce the amount of the property transferred if it determines that that amount substantially exceeds the amount required for the intended use.
MI - Poisonous Substances - § 750.437 Exposing poisonous substances where liable to be eaten by beasts M.C.L.A. 750.437 This Michigan statute makes a person liable and guilty of a misdemeanor if any animal on the person's property is exposed to or consumes a known poisonous substance. The statute makes an exception for poisons that are mixed only with vegetables or poisons for the destruction of predatory or dangerous prowling animals.
MI - Pollution - Environmental Protection Act: Pollution (Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act) M.C.L.A. 324.1701 - 1706 These sections lay out the process and standards to determine a pollution violation, actions for declaratory and equitable relief, the burden of proof, and affirmative defenses to such violations.
MI - Research - Chapter 333. Health. Public Health Code. M.C.L.A. 333.2671 - 2678 This set of Michigan laws proclaims that "[t]he public health and welfare depend on the humane use of animals for the diagnosis and treatment of human and animal diseases." It also creates an animal research advisory board which may regulate and establish standards pursuant to section 2678 controlling the humane use of animals. Further, the department, its representative, or a member of the animal research advisory board may inspect any premises or property on or in which animals are kept for experimental purposes for the purpose of investigation of compliance with board standards. A person shall not keep or use animals for experimental purposes unless registered to do so by the department.
MI - Running at Large - Chapter 433. Animals Running at Large. M.C.L.A. 433.11 - 20 This chapter of Michigan laws deals with animals running at large. In Michigan, an owner cannot allow an animal (defined here as cattle, horses, sheep, swine, mules, burros, or goats) to run at large. In addition, a person that is not the owner of the animal cannot willfully and knowingly allow the animal to run at large. Any person who allows an animal to run at large will be guilty of a misdemeanor. Law enforcement is authorized to take possession of any animal that is running at large. Once the animal is in possession of law enforcement, the owner of the animal must be notified or a notice must be placed in the newspaper within 30 days.
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50a This statute makes it a misdemeanor to (1) willfully and maliciously assault, beat, harass, injure, or attempt to assault, beat, harass, or injure a service animal that he or she knows or has reason to believe is a service animal used by a person with a disability; or (2) willfully and maliciously impede or interfere with, or attempt to impede or interfere with, duties performed by a service animal that he or she knows or has reason to believe is a service animal used by a person with a disability. Violation is a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 90 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50c This statute outlines the penalty for the intentional physical harm or interference with a police dog or horse. The statute provides for a misdemeanor in the case of interference to the animal and a five-year felony where the animal was killed or seriously physically injured. If the interference was committed during the commission of another felony, then the penalty rises to a potential two-year imprisonment.
MI - Statute of Limitations -Chapter 58. Limitation of Actions M.C.L.A. 600.5805 This Michigan statute outlines the statute of limitations for injuries to persons or property.  Under the statute, actions for malpractice have a two-year statute of limitation.
MI - Transgenic and Nonnative Organisms - Chapter 324.Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act M.C.L.A. 324.41301 to 324.41305 The following Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act sections lists which transgenic and non-native organisms are either restricted or prohibited in the state of Michigan. In addition to listing a species as prohibited or restricted, the statute also grants authority to the Commission of Natural Resources (for all species except insects or plants) and to the Commission of Agriculture (for insect and plant species only) to add or delete an organism from either list. The statute also provides exceptions—with qualifications—to possessing a restricted or prohibited species; provisions in which a person can introduce a prohibited or restricted species; and circumstances in which a person is not considered to be in possession of a restricted or prohibited species.
MI - Trapping - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.42501 - 42507 These sections describe the regulations for trapping for furs, hides and pelts. This includes the requirement for a fur dealer's license and for a monthly report of all pelts on hand.
MI - Veterinary - Chapter 333. Health. Public Health Code MCLA 333.18801 - 18838 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
MI - Wildlife Conservation - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. Article III. Natural Resources Ma MCL 324.40101 to MCL 324.40120 These sections define game animals and lay out the regulations for taking/hunting them. Moreover, the statute clarifies that the animals are property of the people of the state and are managed by the state for their benefit. This statute also contains the Scientific Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act passed in August of 2014. The Act allows the Legislature or bipartisan Natural Resources Commission to designate a wildlife species as game, but Natural Resources Commission orders must be consistent with its duty to use sound science. Section 324.40112 also sets out the state's hunter harassment provision.
MI - Wildlife Conservation - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act MCL 324.40501 This Section describes the Department of Natural Resource's authority to co-operate with the federal government and to use hunters' license fees for wildlife restoration.
MI - Wildlife Conservation -Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M. C. L. A. 324.41101 - 41105 These sections describe the regulatory powers of the Department of Natural Resources in issuing conservation orders protecting fish, game, and birds.
MI - Wolves - Control of gray wolves, § 324.95151 to 324.95167 M.C.L.A. 324.95151 - 324.95167 This chapter of Michigan laws deals with the removal, capture, or destruction of gray wolves. According to the laws, a landowner is able to use any means necessary to remove a gray wolf from its property, including lethal force, if the gray wolf is threatening the landowners livestock or dog(s). Once a landowner has removed, captured, or destroyed a gray wolf, the landowner must report it to a department official no later than 12 hours after the removal, capture, or destruction. According to Section 324.95167, the act is not operative until final appellate court issues a decision overruling the decision of The Humane Society of the United States v Dirk Kempthorne that allows removal of wolves from the federal ESA list, or the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service promulgates a final rule dated after March 12, 2007 that removes gray wolves located in this state from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife established under the federal endangered species act of 1973 and that final rule takes effect.
Michigan Compiled Laws 1838: Chapter 8: Section 22 Mich. Rev. Stat. ch. 8, § 22 (1838) The Michigan law concerning the treatment of animals from 1838. The law states the punishment for the crime, and factors for determining if the crime has occurred.
Michigan Compiled Laws 1929: Chapter 285: Section 1 Mich. Comp. Laws ch. 285, § 1 (1929) Chapter 285, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of cruelty to animals," concerns Michigan's Law about the treatment of animals from 1929. The act covers what qualifies as cruelty to animals and what is the punishment for crime of cruelty to animals.
Minnesota 1860-1872 Public Laws: OFFENSES AGAINST CHASTITY, MORALITY, ETC. Minn. Stat. ch. 96 § 18 (1858) Section 18 of Chapter 96 from Minnesota Public Statutes 1860-1872 covers the treatment of animals.  Specifically, the statute covers the punishment for cruelty to animals.
Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. 3-4-9- Cruelty to Animals. Title III, Section 3-4-9 Under Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians code, cruelty to animals is a Class B offense. Any person who shall kill, torture, mistreat, mutilate, injure or abandon any animal shall be guilty of an offense under this section.
MN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animals/Guide Dog Laws M. S. A. §§ 169.202; 343.20; 343.21; 363A.09; 363A.19; 15.001; 256C.001 - 256C.06; § 504B.113; § 604A.302; 609.226; § 609.833 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and service animal laws.
MN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes M. S. A. § 343.01 - 40; 609.294; 609.596 - 597 These Minnesota statute comprise the anti-cruelty laws in the state. This section first allows the formation of private prevention of cruelty to animals societies and humane societies and sets forth their obligations by law. "Animal" is defined by this section as every living creature except members of the human race. No person shall overdrive, overload, torture, cruelly beat, neglect, or unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill any animal, or cruelly work any animal when it is unfit for labor. Under the neglect component, the statute states that no person shall deprive any animal over which the person has charge or control of necessary food, water, or shelter, among other things.
MN - Dangerous - Minnesota Dangerous Dog Definitions, Dog Bites, & Rabies Treatments M. S. A. § 35.67 - 35.69; M.S.A. § 346.51; M.S.A. § 347.50 This Minnesota set of laws outlines the procedure for a town establishing a rabies proclamation and prevents the running at large of unmuzzled dogs in such localities. It also provides that an owner or custodian of a dog which does not have an appropriate antirabies vaccination and which bites or otherwise exposes a person to rabies virus may be penalized under section 346.53.& The statute also defines "dangerous dog" and "potentially dangerous dog."
MN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws M. S. A. 35.67 - 71; 97A.321, 97B.001 - 621; 135A.191; 325F.79-792; 346.01-58; 347.01-56; 365.10; 366.01; § 609.226 These statutes comprise Minnesota's relevant dog laws. Among the provisions include several laws related to natural resources protection and hunting with dogs, the sale of dogs, and laws related to damage done by dogs.
MN - Dogs, license - 347.14. Unlicensed dogs M. S. A. § 347.14 This Minnesota statute, amended in 2006, provides that any person may seize, impound, or restrain any unlicensed dog which the person may find running at large. The fact that a dog is without a license attached to a collar shall be presumptive evidence that the dog is unlicensed. An officer is under a duty to seize and impound such animal.
MN - Domestic Violence - 518B.01. Chapter 518B. Domestic Abuse. M. S. A. § 518B.01 This law reflects Minnesota's provision for restraining orders in cases of domestic abuse. An amendment in 2010 concerns the care and keeping of a companion animal owed by either petitioner or respondent, and has a provision to allow the court to prevent harm to such animal. As stated in the law in subsection 6(a)(14) and (15), the court may provide relief that includes an order to "(14) direct the care, possession, or control of a pet or companion animal owned, possessed, or kept by the petitioner or respondent or a child of the petitioner or respondent; and (15) direct the respondent to refrain from physically abusing or injuring any pet or companion animal, without legal justification, known to be owned, possessed, kept, or held by either party or a minor child residing in the residence or household of either party as an indirect means of intentionally threatening the safety of such person."
MN - Endangered Species - Natural Resources (Ch. 83A-84). Chapter 84. Department of Natural Resources M. S. A. §§ 84.0895, 84.944, 97A.245, 97A.501 This statute protects endangered and threatened species in Minnesota, as defined in the statute. Under the law, a person may not take, import, transport, or sell any portion of an endangered species of wild animal or plant, or sell or possess with intent to sell an article made with any part of the skin, hide, or parts of an endangered species of wild animal or plant. Violation of the statute is a misdemeanor.
MN - Equine Activity Liability - 604A.12. Livestock activities; immunity from liability. M. S. A. § 604A.12 This Minnesota statute comprises the state's equine activity liability statute. The act is not limited to equines, but rather extends protection from liability to participants engaged in "livestock activities." It is important to note that this provision and exemption from liability applies only to non-profit entities. Liability is not limited where the livestock professional knowingly used faulty tack, the person failed to reasonable care to protect the participant from a known, human-made dangerous condition, the person is a livestock activity sponsor and fails to comply with the notice requirement, or the act or omission of the person was willful or negligent.
MN - Exhibition - Chapter 97A. Game and Fish. General Provisions. M. S. A. § 97A.041 In Minnesota, a person may not possess wildlife in captivity for public exhibition purposes without a permit. The commissioner may issue a permit to an applicant qualified by education or experience in the care and treatment of wildlife. A permit shall include a condition that allows an enforcement officer to enter and inspect the facilities where the wildlife covered by the permit are held in captivity. A violation may result in the attorney general bringing an abatement action.
MN - Exotic pet - 346.155. Possessing regulated animals M. S. A. § 346.155 This Minnesota law defines "regulated animal" to mean all members of the Felidae family except the domestic cat, bears, and all non-human primates. Unless a person possessed a regulated animal on or before January 1, 2005, and came into compliance with AWA regulations, possession of the above-mentioned regulated animals is unlawful. A person who lawfully possessed a regulated animal before that date, must comply with registration, microchipping, fee, and inspection requirements.
MN - Fish & Game - Chapter 97A. Game and Fish. Penalties M. S. A. § 97A.301 - 345 These Minnesota statutes pertain to criminal sanctions for violations of fish and game laws. A person is guilty of a misdemeanor if s/he takes, buys, sells, transports or possesses a wild animal in violation of the laws. A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if s/he knowingly disregards no trespassing signs or trespasses after being notified not to trespass. It is also a gross misdemeanor to violate provisions relating to buying or selling fur-bearers, deer, bear, moose, elk, or caribou, fishing with illegal methods, and transporting animals over the limit. A gross misdemeanor may be punished by a fine and/or imprisonment.
MN - Fur - Chapter 17. Department of Agriculture. Fur Farming M.S.A. § 17.351 - 17.37 This set of Minnesota laws relates to fur farming. Under the section, fur-bearing animals are domestic animals and products of fur-bearing animals are agricultural products. A fur farmer is engaged in an agricultural pursuit. A fur farmer may register annually with the state commissioner for $10. A registered fur farmer must file a verified report of the number of pelts of each species of fur-bearing animal sold during the preceding calendar year.
MN - Habitat - Minnesota Environmental Rights Act (Chapter 116B. Environmental Rights) M. S. A. § 116B.01 - 13 Minnesota protects the environment under the Minnesota Environmental Rights Act (MERA). Under MERA, citizens may bring suits for civil remedies where activities are interfering with their enjoyment of natural resources, including eagle nesting sites. The law provides a comprehensive scheme under which anyone with sufficient interest in protecting land, water, air, or any natural resources may bring suit to enjoin an action.
MN - Hospitals and pets - § 144A.30. Pets in nursing homes M.S.A. § 144A.30 This Minnesota statute states that animal nursing homes must be "reasonable" in their care, type, and maintenance of pets.
MN - Hospitals, nursing homes - § 144.573. Pets in certain institutions M.S.A. § 144.573 This Minnesota statute describes the level of care required for pets who live in institutional facilities with their owners.
MN - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 31. Food. Slaughter of Livestock M.S.A. § 31.59 - 31.592 This section comprises Minnesota's humane slaughter laws. The law requires humane slaughter of livestock, defined as any method of slaughtering livestock which normally causes animals to be rendered insensible to pain by a single blow of a mechanical instrument or shot of a firearm or by chemical, or other means that are rapid and effective; or by methods of preparation necessary to Halal ritual slaughter, Jewish ritual slaughter and of slaughtering required by the ritual of the Islamic or Jewish faith. "Livestock" under this act is limited to cattle, horses, swine, sheep and goats.

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