Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort ascending Summary
MN - Fur - Chapter 17. Department of Agriculture. Fur Farming M.S.A. § 17.351 - 17.37 This set of Minnesota laws relates to fur farming. Under the section, fur-bearing animals are domestic animals and products of fur-bearing animals are agricultural products. A fur farmer is engaged in an agricultural pursuit. A fur farmer may register annually with the state commissioner for $10. A registered fur farmer must file a verified report of the number of pelts of each species of fur-bearing animal sold during the preceding calendar year.
MN - Veterinary - Chapter 156. Veterinarians. Board of Veterinary Medicine. M.S.A. § 156.001 - 20 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
MN - Hospitals and pets - § 144A.30. Pets in nursing homes M.S.A. § 144A.30 This Minnesota statute states that animal nursing homes must be "reasonable" in their care, type, and maintenance of pets.
MN - Hospitals, nursing homes - § 144.573. Pets in certain institutions M.S.A. § 144.573 This Minnesota statute describes the level of care required for pets who live in institutional facilities with their owners.
MN - Research animals - 135A.191. Research dogs and cats M.S.A. § 135A.191 This Minnesota law states that a publicly-funded higher education facility that confines dogs or cats for science, education, or research purposes and plans on euthanizing a dog or cat for other than science, education, or research purposes must first offer the dog or cat to an animal rescue organization.
MA - Fur, labeling - Chapter 94. Inspection and Sale of Food, Drugs and Various Articles. M.G.L.A. 94 § 277A This law represents Massachusetts' fur labelling law. Under the law, all natural, dyed or imitation furs, and all articles made wholly or partly therefrom, sold at retail within the commonwealth, shall be plainly marked or labelled with an accurate statement of the material which they contain, together with the name and address of the seller. Whoever violates any provision of this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than two hundred dollars.
MA - Vehicle - § 22H. Safe transportation of animals M.G.L.A. 90 § 22H In Massachusetts, transporting an animal in the back of a motor vehicle on a public way unless such space is enclosed or has side and tail racks to a height of at least 46 inches extending vertically from the floor, the animal is cross tethered to the vehicle, the animal is protected by a secured container or cage or the animal is otherwise protected in a manner which will prevent the animal from being thrown or from falling or jumping from the vehicle results in a fine of not less than $50.
MA - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws M.G.L.A. 90 § 14A; M.G.L.A. 129 § 1, 39C, 39D, 39F, 43; M.G.L.A. 272 § 98A; M.G.L.A. 272 § 85B; M.G.L.A. 140 § 139 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and service dog laws.
MA - Horse - § 3. Sleigh or sled; bells M.G.L.A. 89 § 3 This Massachusetts law states that no person shall travel on a way with a sleigh or sled drawn by a horse, unless there are at least three bells attached to some part of the harness.
MA - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes M.G.L.A. 272 § 77 - 95; M.G.L.A. 22C § 57; M.G.L.A. 272 § 34 These Massachusetts laws contain the state's anti-cruelty provisions. Sec. 77 is the operative anti-cruelty statute and provides that whoever overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, cruelly beats, mutilates or kills an animal, and whoever uses in a cruel or inhuman manner in a race, game, or contest, or in training, as lure or bait a live animal (except as bait in fishing), or knowingly and willfully authorizes or permits it to be subjected to unnecessary torture, suffering or cruelty of any kind shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 7 years or imprisonment for not more than 2 1/2 years or by a fine of not more than $5,000, or by both such fine and imprisonment. Other laws prohibit the dyeing of baby chicks, the docking of horse tails, and animal fighting, among other provisions. In 2010, the state made non-medically necessary devocalization of dogs or cats illegal.
MA - Lien - § 24. Domestic animals; care and custody M.G.L.A. 255 § 24 Persons having proper charges due them for pasturing, boarding or keeping horses or other domestic animals which are brought to their premises or placed in their care by or with the consent of the owners thereof shall have a lien on such animals for such charges.
MA - Domestic Violence - § 11. Possession, care and control of domesticated animal owned by persons involved in certain protecti M.G.L.A. 209A § 11 This Massachusetts law, effective October of 2012, allows the court to order the possession, care and control of any domesticated animal owned, possessed, leased, kept or held by either party or a minor child residing in the household to the plaintiff or petitioner in a no contact or restraining order. The court may order the defendant to refrain from abusing, threatening, taking, interfering with, transferring, encumbering, concealing, harming or otherwise disposing of such animal.
MA - Pet Trust - Chapter 203. Trusts. M.G.L.A. 203E § 408 In 2011, Massachusetts enacted this law, which allows the creation of a trust for the continuing care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the last animal named in the trust. A court may reduce the amount of property held by the trust if it determines that the amount substantially exceeds the amount required for the intended use and the court finds that there will be no substantial adverse impact in the care, maintenance, health or appearance of the covered animal. The statute was renumbered in 2012.
MA - Cat of commonwealth - Chapter 2. Arms, Great Seal and Other Emblems of the Commonwealth. M.G.L.A. 2 § 30 The Tabby cat shall be the official cat of the Massachusetts commonwealth.
MA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws M.G.L.A. 2 § 14; M.G.L.A. 112 § 12Z; M.G.L.A. 128A § 14E; M.G.L.A. 266 § 47; M.G.L.A. 140 § 136A - § 174F; M.G.L.A. 129 § 39G; M.G.L.A. 131 § 20, 21, 21A, 82 These Massachusetts statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include licensing laws, dangerous dog laws, and rabies vaccination provisions.
MA - Leash - § 174B. Restraint of dogs in public highway rest areas; penalty M.G.L.A. 140 § 174B This Massachusetts law states that whoever is the owner or keeper of a dog shall restrain said dog by a chain or leash when in an officially designated public highway rest area. Whoever violates the provisions of this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than $100.
MA - Lost Property - Chapter 134. Lost Goods and Stray Beasts M.G.L.A. 134 § 1 - 7 This section comprises Massachusetts' Lost Goods and Stray Beasts Act.
MA - Endangered Species - Chapter 131A. Massachusetts Endangered Species Act M.G.L.A. 131A § 1 - 7 This Massachusetts statute comprises the state's endangered species act. "Endangered species", any species of plant or animal in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range including those species listed under the federal ESA. The director shall conduct investigations and consult with the natural heritage and endangered species advisory committee in order to determine whether any species of plant or animal constitutes an endangered or threatened species or species of special concern. Habitat alteration permits are required under this act when any person undertakes a project that may alter a significant portion of habitat.
MA - Fur - Chapter 131. Inland Fisheries and Game and Other Natural Resources. M.G.L.A. 131 § 80A Massachusetts law provides that a person may not use or possess any trap for capturing furbearing mammals except for common mouse and rat traps, nets, and box or cage traps. Traps designed to capture and hold a furbearing mammal by gripping the mammal's body, or body part are prohibited, including steel jaw leghold traps, padded leghold traps, and snares. This prohibition does not apply to federal, state, or municipal departments for the protection from threats to human health and safety (e.g., beaver or muskrat caused flooding or damage).
MA - Exotic Pets - Chapter 131. Inland Fisheries and Game and Other Natural Resources. M.G.L.A. 131 § 77A Massachusetts bans hybrid animals, those offspring of mating between a domestic animal and its wild counterpart, usually wolves and dogs. No individual may possess or own a hybrid as a pet.
MA - Possession - Chapter 131. Inland Fisheries and Game and Other Natural Resources. M.G.L.A. 131 § 75A Massachusetts specifically protects the eagle as a bird of prey from hunting or possession, unless provided by permit. The law further prohibits the possession, harassment or harming of the eggs and nests of birds of prey. Notably, sale and transportation are not specifically listed under the statute.
MA - Hunting, Internet - § 65A. Online Shooting or Spearing M.G.L.A. 131 § 65A This statute prohibits hunting via the Internet and the operation of online hunting businesses within the state of Massachusetts. Violation is punished by imprisonment in the house of correction for not more than 2 1/2 years or by a fine of not more than $2,500, or by both a fine and imprisonment.
MA - Hunting - Chapter 131. Inland Fisheries and Game and Other Natural Resources. M.G.L.A. 131 § 5C This law reflects Massachusetts' hunter harassment provision. Under the law, no person shall obstruct, interfere with or otherwise prevent the lawful taking of fish or wildlife by another at the locale where such activity is taking place. Acts prohibited include, but are not limited to, driving or disturbing wildlife, harassing another engaged in lawful taking of fish or wildlife, interjecting oneself into the line of fire, or erecting barriers to prevent access. A person may seek an injunction to prevent violation of this section and a person who sustains damages from any act in violation of the law may bring a civil action for punitive damages.
MA - Exotic pet, breeding - Chapter 131. Inland Fisheries and Game and Other Natural Resources. M.G.L.A. 131 § 23 Massachusetts bans private possession of exotic pets, and requires licenses for those who deal and propagate wild species for other reasons. The Massachusetts director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife also issues a list of exempted species for which no permit is needed.
MA - Eggs - Ch. 129 Prevention of Farm Animal Cruelty Act M.G.L.A. 129 §§ 1-1 - 1-12 This collection of laws was created by Massachusetts voters when they approved Question 3 and the 2016 ballot. These laws prevent the inhumane confinement of pregnant pigs, calves raised for veal, and egg-laying hens in the state of Massachusetts. These laws also prohibit the sale of products in Massachusetts made from animals confined in violation of these laws.
MA - Equine transport - License plates for vehicles transporting equine animals M.G.L.A. 129 § 46 - 48 This Massachusetts law provides that vehicles transporting equines must have a special license plate. Also, the use of multiple deck vehicles or the so-called "possum belly" vehicle used in the transportation of equine animals is prohibited.
MA - Pet Sales Age Restriction - Chapter 129. Livestock Disease Control M.G.L.A. 129 § 39G; § 43 This statute provides that any dog or cat brought or shipped into the commonwealth shall be accompanied by an official health certificate issued by an accredited veterinarian, a copy of which shall be sent to the commissioner of agricultural resources. Further, a commercial establishment, pet shop, firm or corporation shall not import into the commonwealth, for sale or resale in the commonwealth, a cat or dog less than 8 weeks of age.
MA - Equine Activity Liability Statute - Chapter 128. Agriculture. M.G.L.A. 128 § 2D This Massachusetts law provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities. The statute sets out several definitions related to equine activities, but specifically notes that the term "engage in an equine activity" shall not include being a spectator at an equine activity, except in cases where the spectator places himself in an unauthorized area or in immediate proximity to the equine activity. Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.
MA - Cruelty, reporting - § 85. Department employees reporting animal cruelty, abuse or neglect; immunity from liability M.G.L.A. 119 § 85 This Massachusetts statute provides that a state employee acting within the scope of his or her employment, who has knowledge of or observes an animal whom he knows or reasonably suspects has been the victim of animal cruelty, abuse or neglect may report it to the entities that investigate these reports or any local animal control. The statute describes how to make the report, timing to submit, and who can make the report if 2 or more employees witness the abuse. The statute also makes clear that no person who makes a report shall be liable in any civil or criminal action if the report was made in good faith.
MA - Veterinary - Veterinary Practice Laws M.G.L.A. 112 § 54 - 60 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
MA - Police animals - 9A Emergency treatment of police dogs M.G.L.A. 111C § 9A This 2022 Massachusetts law mandates that EMS personnel provide emergency treatment to a police dog injured in the line of duty and transport such police dog by ambulance to a veterinary care facility equipped to provide emergency treatment to dogs. EMS personnel shall not transport an injured police dog if providing such transport would inhibit their ability to provide emergency medical attention or transport to a person requiring such services. The law also outlines training for EMS personnel in treating police dogs.
MI - Constitutional Provisions - § 5. State lands M.C.L.A. Const. Art. 10, § 5 This section describes the State legislature's authority over all state land and the requirement that all departments that have supervision or control of any state land submit an annual report as to the status of such land to the legislature
MI - Forfeiture - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code M.C.L.A. 750.53 This statute provides that a person violating any of the animal cruelty statutes may be arrested without warrant, similar to the arrest of those found disturbing the peace.  Further, the official making the arrest has a duty to seize the animals involved and place them in the custody of the jurisdiction.
MI - Cruelty - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.52 (Repealed by P.A.2015, No. 210, § 1(f), Eff. March 14, 2016) Note: Repealed by P.A.2015, No. 210, § 1(f), Eff. March 14, 2016. This statute provides that it is the duty of the officials involved in animal cruelty investigations to arrest and prosecute those committing the offenses where there is knowledge or reasonable notice of the acts. The failure or neglect by an officer involved to do so may result in a misdemeanor.
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50c This statute outlines the penalty for the intentional physical harm or interference with a police dog or horse. The statute provides for a misdemeanor in the case of interference to the animal and a five-year felony where the animal was killed or seriously physically injured. If the interference was committed during the commission of another felony, then the penalty rises to a potential two-year imprisonment.
MI - Cruelty - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50b This is the felony animal cruelty law in Michigan. Under the law, a person is guilty of killing or torturing animals if they: (a) knowingly kill, torture, mutilate, maim, or disfigure an animal; (b) commit a reckless act knowing or having reason to know that the act will cause an animal to be killed, tortured, mutilated, maimed, or disfigured; (c) knowingly administer poison to an animal, or knowingly expose an animal to any poisonous substance, with the intent that the substance be taken or swallowed by the animal; or (d) violate or threaten to violate subdivision (a) or (c) with the intent to cause mental suffering or distress to a person or to exert control over a person. Whether the offense becomes a first, second, or third degree felony depends on listed factors, including whether the animal is a companion animal (as defined in the law). A first degree felony conviction results in imprisonment up to 10 years, a fine of not more than $5,000, and/or community service for not more than 500 hours. As a part of the sentence, the court may order the defendant to pay the costs of the prosecution and the costs of the care, housing, and veterinary medical care for the animal victim, and the court may order the defendant to not own or possess an animal for ANY period of time including permanent relinquishment. Lawful killing of animals including fishing, hunting, pest control, and scientific research are excluded.
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50a This statute makes it a misdemeanor to (1) willfully and maliciously assault, beat, harass, injure, or attempt to assault, beat, harass, or injure a service animal that he or she knows or has reason to believe is a service animal used by a person with a disability; or (2) willfully and maliciously impede or interfere with, or attempt to impede or interfere with, duties performed by a service animal that he or she knows or has reason to believe is a service animal used by a person with a disability. Violation is a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 90 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.
MI - Food animal - § 750.477a Sale of unlabelled horse and dog meat M.C.L.A. 750.477a This Michigan statute makes it a misdemeanor for an individual to knowingly sell any horse or dog meat unless it is plainly labelled.
MI - Poisonous Substances - § 750.437 Exposing poisonous substances where liable to be eaten by beasts M.C.L.A. 750.437 This Michigan statute makes a person liable and guilty of a misdemeanor if any animal on the person's property is exposed to or consumes a known poisonous substance. The statute makes an exception for poisons that are mixed only with vegetables or poisons for the destruction of predatory or dangerous prowling animals.
MI - Statute of Limitations -Chapter 58. Limitation of Actions M.C.L.A. 600.5805 This Michigan statute outlines the statute of limitations for injuries to persons or property.  Under the statute, actions for malpractice have a two-year statute of limitation.
MI - Courtroom - 600.2163a. Protections and procedures for minor, developmentally-disabled, and vulnerable-adult M.C.L.A. 600.2163a This law relates to the use of courtroom support dogs, which became effective in January 2019. The court must permit a witness who is called upon to testify to have a courtroom support dog and handler sit with, or be in close proximity to, the witness during his or her testimony. For purposes of this law, "witness" is defined as a person under the age of 16, a person over 16 who has a developmental disability, or a vulnerable adult. This section only applies to certain prosecutions and proceedings under the Michigan penal code. A notice of intent to use a support person or courtroom support dog is only required if the support person or courtroom support dog is to be utilized during trial and is not required for the use of a support person or courtroom support dog during any other courtroom proceeding. “Courtroom support dog” means a dog that has been trained and evaluated as a support dog pursuant to the Assistance Dogs International Standards for guide or service work and that is repurposed and appropriate for providing emotional support to children and adults within the court or legal system or that has performed the duties of a courtroom support dog prior to September 27, 2018.
MI - Lien - 570.185. Lien of mechanic, artisan, or tradesman for manufacture of goods or keeping or care of animals M.C.L.A. 570.185 This Michigan law states that when a person delivers any horse, mule, neat cattle, sheep, or swine to be kept or cared for to another person, that person shall have a lien thereon for the keeping and care of such animals, and may retain possession of the same until such charges are paid.
MI - Running at Large - Chapter 433. Animals Running at Large. M.C.L.A. 433.11 - 20 This chapter of Michigan laws deals with animals running at large. In Michigan, an owner cannot allow an animal (defined here as cattle, horses, sheep, swine, mules, burros, or goats) to run at large. In addition, a person that is not the owner of the animal cannot willfully and knowingly allow the animal to run at large. Any person who allows an animal to run at large will be guilty of a misdemeanor. Law enforcement is authorized to take possession of any animal that is running at large. Once the animal is in possession of law enforcement, the owner of the animal must be notified or a notice must be placed in the newspaper within 30 days.
MI - Research - Chapter 333. Health. Public Health Code. M.C.L.A. 333.2671 - 2678 This set of Michigan laws proclaims that "[t]he public health and welfare depend on the humane use of animals for the diagnosis and treatment of human and animal diseases." It also creates an animal research advisory board which may regulate and establish standards pursuant to section 2678 controlling the humane use of animals. Further, the department, its representative, or a member of the animal research advisory board may inspect any premises or property on or in which animals are kept for experimental purposes for the purpose of investigation of compliance with board standards. A person shall not keep or use animals for experimental purposes unless registered to do so by the department.
MI - Emergency - 333.20925. Emergency transport of police dog M.C.L.A. 333.20925 This law, effective in March of 2019, states that the provisions of the Emergency Medical Services Act does not prohibit an ambulance from providing emergency transport of a police dog that is injured in the line of duty to a veterinary clinic or similar facility, if the police dog is in need of emergency medical treatment and there are no individuals who require transport or emergency assistance at that time.
MI - Wolves - Control of gray wolves, § 324.95151 to 324.95167 M.C.L.A. 324.95151 - 324.95167 This chapter of Michigan laws deals with the removal, capture, or destruction of gray wolves. According to the laws, a landowner is able to use any means necessary to remove a gray wolf from its property, including lethal force, if the gray wolf is threatening the landowners livestock or dog(s). Once a landowner has removed, captured, or destroyed a gray wolf, the landowner must report it to a department official no later than 12 hours after the removal, capture, or destruction. According to Section 324.95167, the act is not operative until final appellate court issues a decision overruling the decision of The Humane Society of the United States v Dirk Kempthorne that allows removal of wolves from the federal ESA list, or the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service promulgates a final rule dated after March 12, 2007 that removes gray wolves located in this state from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife established under the federal endangered species act of 1973 and that final rule takes effect.
MI - Hunting/Recreational Trespass - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.73101 - 73302 These sections describe the Department of Natural Resources ability to enforce and prosecute persons who enter upon the land of another, who remove or destroy signs or posters or enclose someone else's land without permission. These sections also describe the potential liability of landowners.
MI - Fish & Wildlife, Generally Powers - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.501 - 507 These sections lay out the creation, jurisdiction, powers and duties of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.
MI - Fishing - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.48701 - 48727 These sections lay out the guidelines for sport fishing including legal fishing devices, the open season for each species as well as the minimum legal size requirement for each species of fish.
MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.43301 - 43303 These sections place limitations on acreage held for sporting purposes and on acreage within 2 miles of other lands held for sporting purposes.

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