Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
NH - Wolf - Chapter 207. General Provisions as to Fish and Game. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 207:61 This New Hampshire statute prohibits the introduction of wolf populations into the state by a person or state agency.
NH - Hunting, Internet - § 207:8-a. Remote Control or Internet Hunting Prohibited N.H. Rev. Stat. § 207:8-a This statute prohibits engaging in internet hunting or assisting another person in internet hunting within the state of New Hampshire. Any person who violates this section is guilty of a class A misdemeanor if a natural person and guilty of a felony if any other person. In addition, the executive director may impose a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 for each violation of this section.
NH - Eagle, Golden - Chapter 209. Game Birds; Pigeons. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 209:1 - 209:13 New Hampshire prohibits the hunting, capturing, killing, or possession of any bald or golden eagle or disturbing eagle nests and young.
NH - Disaster - Chapter 21-P. Department of Safety. Homeland Security and Emergency Management. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 21-P:37-a In New Hampshire, state policy mandates that service animals and the people they serve be kept together in cases of emergency. State emergency planning and training must take that requirement into account.
NH - Endangered - Chapter 212-A. Endangered Species Conservation Act N.H. Rev. Stat. § 212-A:1 to 212-A:16 These New Hampshire statutes outline the Endangered Species Conservation Act. The definitions of the terms used in the Act are described especially with regard to what constitutes endangered and threatened species. Violation of the Act is accomplished by taking a protected species and incurs a misdemeanor penalty.
NH - Veterinary - Chapter 332-B. New Hampshire Veterinary Practice Act. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 332-B:1 - 332-B:20 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
NH - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 3:25; § 4:13-s; § 466:1 - 466:54; 47:17; 207:11 - 207:13b; 210:18; 264:31; 436:99 - 436:109; 437:1 - 437:22; 437-A:1 - 9; 508:18-a; § 644:8-f These New Hampshire statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, dangerous dog laws, and the rabies control code.
NH - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 427. Livestock and Meat Inspection. Humane Slaughter N.H. Rev. Stat. § 427:33 - 427:37 These laws comprise New Hampshire's humane slaughter provisions. A humane method is defined as one where the animal is rendered insensible to pain by a single blow or shot of a mechanical instrument or by electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective, before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast, or cut. Ritual slaughter required by the ritual of the Jewish faith, whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain is also allowed. Any slaughterer who violates this subdivision shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.
NH - Impound - Chapter 436. Diseases of Domestic Animals. Rabies Control. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 436:107 This New Hampshire statute provides that the local rabies control authority shall establish and maintain a pound. Any dog found off the owner's premises and not wearing a valid vaccination tag shall be impounded and maintained at the pound for a minimum of 7 days unless reclaimed earlier by the owner. Notice of impoundment of all dogs, including any significant marks of identification, shall be posted at the pound as public notification of impoundment. If the dog is unclaimed at the end of 7 days, the rabies control authority may dispose of the dog in accordance with applicable laws or rules.
NH - Lien - 448:2-a Lien for Food and Care N.H. Rev. Stat. § 448:2-a Any person or carrier who transports animals shall have a lien upon such animals for food, care, and custody furnished, and is not liable for their detention.
NH - Divorce - 458:16-a Property Settlement. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 458:16-a This New Hampshire statute defines "property" for purposes of the state's marriage dissolution (divorce) procedure. In August of 2019, a new provision was added to this law related to animals (Subsection II-a). This subsection states that "[t]angible property shall include animals. In such cases, the property settlement shall address the care and ownership of the parties' animals, taking into consideration the animals' wellbeing."
NH - Exotic Pets - Chapter 466-A. Wolf Hybrids N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466-A:1 to 466-A:6 This section of laws comprises New Hampshire's wolf-dog hybrid act. Under the law, no person shall sell or resell, offer for sale or resale, or release or cause to be released a wolf hybrid in the state of New Hampshire. A person may temporarily import a wolf hybrid provided that he or she shows proof of spaying or neutering and has accurate vaccination records. Each wolf hybrid shall be under the physical control of the owner or confined in an enclosure or structure sufficient to prohibit escape. Any person in violation of this chapter or any rule adopted under this chapter shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor.
NH - Licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:29 This New Hampshire statute provides that, in the case of a rabies epidemic, the mayor and aldermen of a city or the selectmen of a town may order that all dogs within the limits of the city or town shall be muzzled or restrained from running at large during the time prescribed by such order. Any offending dog may be impounded.
NH - Licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:30-a This New Hampshire law provides that it is unlawful for any dog to run at large. "At large" is defined as "off the premises of the owner or keeper and not under the control of any person by means of personal presence and attention as will reasonably control the conduct of such dog, unless accompanied by the owner or custodian." Any authorized person may seize such at large dogs.
NH - Ordinances - 466:30-b Referendum (muzzling and restraining dogs) N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:30-b This New Hampshire statute outlines the required referendum format if a town seeks to adopt an ordinance that prohibits the running at large of dogs. Towns that do not adopt this statutory format may regulate the running at large of dogs by enacting ordinances that comply with other statutes.
NH - Dog Bite - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:31 to 31-a Under this section, a dog is considered to be a nuisance, a menace, or vicious to persons or to property if it is "at large," if it barks for sustained periods, if it chases cars continuously, or if it growls, snaps at or bites persons. If a dog bites a person and breaks the skin, the animal control officer must inform the victim whether the dog was vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours.
NH - Kennel - CHAPTER 466. DOGS AND CATS. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:6 This New Hampshire statute outlines the provisions of dog group licenses (i.e., kennel licenses).
NH - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 508. Limitation of Actions. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 508:19 This New Hampshire statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person engaged in an equine activity, shall not be liable for an injury or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant. The statute also sets out several definitions and specifically states that the term "engages in an equine activity" does not include being a spectator at an equine activity, except in cases where the spectator is in an unauthorized area and in immediate proximity to the equine activity.
NH - Trusts - Chapter 564-B. Uniform Trust Code. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 564-B:4-408 This statute represents New Hampshire's pet trust law. The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
NH - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 5:15-b; § 21-P:37-a; 167-D:1 - 10; 265:41-a; § 376-A:15 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NH - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 644:8 - 644:8-g; N.H. Rev. Stat. § 437-B:1 These New Hampshire statutes provide the animals anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions for the state. Included are general anti-cruelty laws for any animal (including domestic and wild animals), exhibitions of fighting animals, provisions for protection of animals riding in motor vehicles, restrictions related to docking the tail of a horse, provisions for the use of animals in science classes or fairs, laws against maiming or willfully interfering with police dogs or horses, laws related to the willful interference with organizations or projects involving animals, and provisions related to dogs riding in pick-up trucks.
New Jersey Revision of Statutes 1709-1877: Chapter XII Supplement: An act for the prevention of cruelty to animals. N.J. Rev. Stat. 64-82 (1873) A supplement to the New Jersey Revision of Statutes for 1877. The supplement covered standing for officer's of New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In addition, the supplement addresses the question of jurisdiction for the enforcement the anti-cruelty laws.
New Jersey Revision of Statutes 1709-1877: Chapter XII: An act for the prevention of cruelty to animals. N.J. Rev. Stat. §§ 64-82 (1873) A compilation of the New Jersey anti-cruelty laws as of 1877. The laws covered include treatment of animals, penalties, and exceptions for scientific experiments.
NJ - Education - 18A:35-4.25. Right of pupil to refuse participation in dissection activities N.J.S.A. 18A:35-4.25 This New Jersey law allows a public school pupil from kindergarten through grade 12 to refuse to dissect, vivisect, incubate, capture or otherwise harm or destroy animals or any parts thereof as part of a course of instruction. The school must notify pupils and parents at the beginning of each school on the right to decline participation. Any pupil who chooses to refrain from participation in or observation shall be offered an alternative education project for the purpose of providing the pupil with the factual knowledge, information or experience required by the course of study. A pupil shall not be discriminated against, in grading or in any other manner, based upon a decision to exercise the rights of this act.
NJ - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N.J.S.A. 2A:42-109; 10:5-5; 10:5-29.1 - 11; 39:4-37.1; 27:25-5b; 48:3-33; App. A:9-43.2; 2C:29-3.1, 3.2; 48:3-33; 18A:46-13.3; 36:2-213 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NJ - Horse - 39:4-15. Sleigh bells on horses attached to a sleigh N.J.S.A. 39:4-15 This New Jersey law states that no person shall drive a horse attached to a sleigh or sled on a highway unless there are a sufficient number of bells attached to the horse's harness to give warning of its approach.
NJ - Pet Trusts - Trusts for care of domesticated animals N.J.S.A. 3B:31-24 A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal. Note: this section replaces the original law (3B:11-38) enacted in 2001 and repealed in 2016.
NJ - Disaster - App. A:9-43.15. Emergency evacuation; boarding of public transportation or public transportation service with domestic companion animal N.J.S.A. App. A:9-43.15 This New Jersey law states that in the event that a state of emergency has been declared and an evacuation of any region of the State is in progress, the owner of a domestic companion animal shall be permitted to board any public transportation or public transportation service with the domestic companion animal so long as that animal is under the owner's control by use of a leash or tether, or is properly confined in an appropriate container or by other suitable means, provided that such boarding is authorized by and consistent with the provisions of the State Emergency Operations Plan. Additionally, all passengers with service animals shall be given priority seating on all means of transportation.
NV - Lien - 108.540. Lien upon animals; priority; demand for payment; foreclosure; penalty for taking or driving away animal N.R.S. 108.540 Any person furnishing feed, pasture or otherwise boarding any animal(s), at the request or with the consent of the owner, has a lien upon the animal(s), and may retain possession thereof until the sum due for the feed, pasture or board has been paid. Before foreclosing the lien by sale, the person furnishing the feed, pasture or board shall mail a registered or certified letter to the owner of the animal(s), at the owner's last known address, demanding payment. Any person who takes and drives away any such animal(s), while in the possession of the person feeding, pasturing or boarding them, without the consent of that person, and without first having paid all reasonable charges due thereon, is guilty of a misdemeanor.
NV - Bestiality - 201.455. Bestiality; penalties N.R.S. 201.455 This Nevada law, enacted in 2017, prohibits bestiality. Convicted violators face the relinquishing and permanently forfeiting ownership or possession of all animals which are in the same household as the person to an animal shelter, an organization that takes into custody animals which have been abused or neglected, or a society for the prevention of cruelty to animals. The court may also impose a possession ban on owning or keeping any animal for a period determined by the court. Those convicted must undergo a psychological evaluation and any recommended counseling and must pay all reasonable costs incurred for the care and maintenance of the animal involved in the crime and any other animal relinquished by the person. If the person convicted of the crime of bestiality is not the owner of the animal involved in the crime, reimbursing the owner of the animal for all medical expenses incurred for treating the animal.
NV - Damages, pet - 41.740. Damages for which person who kills or injures pet N.R.S. 41.740 This Nevada law provides that if a "natural person" intentionally, willfully, recklessly or negligently injures or kills the pet of another natural person, the person is liable for (a) the cost of veterinary care incurred because of the injury or death of the pet; (b) any reduction in market value of the pet caused by the injury; (c) the market value and reasonable burial expenses if the pet is killed; and (d) reasonable attorney's fees and costs incurred in bringing an action under this section. All the damages must not exceed $5,000 per pet. There are several exceptions under the law. A pet is defined as any domesticated dog or cat normally maintained in or near the household of its owner.
NV - Eagle - Chapter 503. Hunting, Fishing and Trapping; N.R.S. 503.610 Nevada has a law that specifically protects both bald (American) and golden eagles. The statute makes it illegal to possess or capture by whatever means either species. The law does allow for the taking of an eagle pursuant to permit only if the eagle has seriously injured agricultural or other interests, provided it is consistent with federal law and no other alternative is appropriate.
NV - Migratory bird - 503.620. Protection of birds included in Migratory Bird Treaty Act N.R.S. 503.620 This Nevada law makes it unlawful for any person to hunt or take any dead or alive birds, nests of birds or eggs of birds protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of July 3, 1918 (16 U.S.C. §§ 703 et seq.) or accompanying regulations.
NV - Leash Law - Chapter 503. Hunting, Fishing and Trapping; Miscellaneous Protective Measures N.R.S. 503.631, 636 This Nevada statute makes it illegal to permit such dog to run at large if such dog is actively tracking, pursuing, harassing, attacking or killing any wildlife in a state-owned wildlife management area.
NV - Horses, wild - 504.490. Unlawful acts; penalty N.R.S. 504.490 This Nevada law prohibits any unauthorized person from doing certain acts with regard to wild horses such as removing them from public lands, harassing wild horses, or using aircraft or a motor vehicle to hunt wild horses (among other listed actions). Violation is a gross misdemeanor. A person who willfully and maliciously kills a wild horse is guilty of a category C felony.
NY - Endangered Species - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. N.Y. Envtl. Conserv. Law § 11-0535 The New York code for endangered species defines endangered species as any species which meets one of the following criteria: native species in imminent danger of extirpation or extinction in New York; or species listed as endangered by the United States Department of the Interior in the Code of Federal Regulations (50 CFR part 17).
NY - Eagles - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. N.Y. Envtl. Conserv. Law § 11-0537 New York makes it illegal to "knowingly or with wanton disregard for the consequences" take, transport, possess, or engage in commerce of bald eagles or their parts without a valid permit. This incorporates the exact language of the federal act.
New York Consolidated Laws 1909: Sections 180-196 N.Y. Penal Law §§ 180-196 (Consol. 1909) Article 16, entitled "Animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1909. The act covers such topics as the keeping of animals for fighting to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180 for important words such as animal and torture.
New York Consolidated Laws 1938: Sections 180-196 N.Y. Penal Law §§ 180-196 (Consol. 1938) Article 16, entitled "Animals", concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1938. The act covers such topics as poisoning of animals to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180.
New York Penal Law 1866: Chapter 682: Section 2 N.Y. Rev. Stat. 682.2 (1866) Chapter 682 from New York Penal Law of 1866 covers cruelty to animals. Section 2 from this chapter describes the offense entitled neglect of disabled animals. The law states the penalty for leaving a disabled or diseased animal to die on any state or city land.
New York Revised Statutes 1874: Chapter 12: Sections 1-8 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 12, §§ 1-8 (1874) Chapter 12, entitled "An act relating to animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1874.
New York Revised Statutes 1867: Chapter 375: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 375, §§ 1-10 (1867) Chapter 375, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's law on animal treatment for 1867.
New York Revised Statute 1881: Chapter 682: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 682, § 26 (1881) Section 26 of Chapter 682 from New York Revised Statutes 1881 concerns the treatment of animals by the owner or any other person. A person found harming such an animal would be guilty of a misdemeanor.
New York Revised Statutes 1866: Chapter 783: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 783, §§ 1-10 (1866) Chapter 783, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's Law on animal treatment for 1866.
New York Revised Statutes 1829: Title 6: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. stat. tit. 6, 26 (1829) The law contained in Title 6, Section 26 of the New York Revised Statutes of 1829 concerns the offense of maliciously killing an animal of another. The statute describes the type of animals covered and the punishment for killing, wounding, or maiming such an animal. In addition, the statute also states the punishment for the offense of cruelty to animals.
AU - Parks - National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (SA) National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972

An Act to provide for the establishment and management of reserves for public benefit and enjoyment; to provide for the conservation of wildlife in a natural environment; and for other purposes.

AU - Wildlife - National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 (NSW) National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 An Act to consolidate and amend the law relating to the establishment, preservation and management of national parks, historic sites and certain other areas and the protection of certain fauna, native plants and Aboriginal objects .
AU - Nature Conservation Act 1980 ( ACT) Nature Conservation Act 1980 An Act to make provision for the protection and conservation of native animals and native plants, and for the preservation of areas for those purposes. The Act creates the office of Conservator of Flora and Fauna and the Australian Capital Territory Parks and Conservation Service.
AU - Wildlife - Nature Conservation Act 2002 (TAS) Nature Conservation Act 2002 No. 63 of 2002 31.12.2002

An Act to make provision with respect to the conservation and protection of the fauna, flora and geological diversity of the State,   to provide for the declaration of national parks and other reserved   land and for related purposes.

ND - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws NDCC 11-11-14; 20.1-04-12 - 12.2; 20.1-05-02.1; 23-36-01 - 09; 36-21-10 - 11; 40-05-01 -2; 40-05-19; 42-03-01 - 04; 43-29-16.1; 12.1-17-09 These statutes comprise North Dakota's dog laws. Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, rabies, control laws, provisions that define dogs as a public nuisance, and laws concerning dogs that harass big game or livestock.

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