Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
SC - Leash - § 51-3-145. Certain acts unlawful at state parks. Code 1976 § 51-3-145

This South Carolina law contains a dog leash provision that states that it is unlawful for any person to bring a dog or any other animal into the park or facility unless it is crated, caged, or upon a leash not longer than six feet or otherwise under physically restrictive control at all times (see section P).  This provision concerns any park or facility under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

SC - Trust - § 62-7-408. Trust for care of animal Code 1976 § 62-7-408

South Carolina's pet trust law was originally enacted in 2006.  A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal or animals alive or in gestation during the settlor's lifetime, whether or not alive at the time the trust is created. The trust terminates upon the death of the last surviving animal.

New Zealand - Animal Welfare - Code for Layer Hens 1999 Code of Animal Welfare No. 18 In New Zealand, hens are kept under conditions ranging from large commercial enterprises where the birds are totally reliant on humans for all their daily requirements to free-ranging hens which have access to outdoor runs or pasture. Provided those concerned with the day-to-day care of the hens treat them with skill and consideration, their welfare can be safeguarded under a variety of management systems. The code takes account of five basic requirements: freedom from thirst, hunger and malnutrition, the provision of appropriate comfort and shelter, the prevention, or rapid diagnosis and treatment, of injury, disease or infection, freedom from distress, and the ability to display normal patterns of behavior.
EU - Farming - Commission Directive 2002/4/EC on the registration of establishments keeping laying hens Commission Directive 2002/4/EC

This EU commission directive concerns Council Directive 1999/74/EC on the registration of establishments keeping laying hens. It mandates that Member States establish a registration system for egg producers covered by Directive 199/74/EC.

AU - Companion Animals - Companion Animals Act 1998 (NSW) Companion Animals Act 1998

The Companion Animals Act, came into effect in September 1998. The Act is designed to benefit pets, their owners and the wider community. Part two of the Act provides for the permanent identification and lifetime registration system which came into effect on 1 July 1999. This was designed to greatly assists authorities in returning lost and injured animals to their owners. It provides NSW councils with a more effective means of keeping track of dogs and cats for the benefit of the wider community. The Act also outlines the requirements when a person is the owner of a ‘controlled dog’ or dangerous breed as well as giving the courts and local councils the ability under legislation to declare a dog ‘dangerous’. The Act also covers nuisance dogs and situations where a dog attack has occurred and the civil liability of dog owners.

Connecticut General Statutes: Title 56: Sections 6480 - 6482n Conn. Gen. Stat. Tit. 56 §§ 6480-6482 (1918)

Sections 6480-6482 of Title 56 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers offences against public policy.  Specifically, the statutes cover following topics: animal fighting, penalty for attending a fight, and unlawful exhibition of sports for gain.

Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 329: Section 6268 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6268 (1918)

Section 6268 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the unlawful injury to certain property of another.  Specifically, the statute states the punishment for hurting, maiming, poisoning anther's cattle, ox, horse, and mule.

Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 331: Section 6367 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6367 (1918).

Section 6367 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the transportation of wild animals.  Specifically, the statute establishes the duty of care that must be given to the public when transporting a wild animal.

Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 337: Section 6546 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6546 (1918)

Section 6546 of Chapter 337 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers jurisdiction and powers of courts. Specifically, the statute states the power of the court to issue search warrants for animal cruelty. 

Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 338: Section 6619 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6619 (1918)

Section 6619 of Chapter 338 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers information, procedure and bail. Specifically, the statute states the circumstances for reach a search warrant will be issued.

Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 96: Sections 1879-1886 Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 1879-1886 (1918)

Sections 1879-1886 of Chapter 96 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers in general the Humane Society for Connecticut.  Specifically, the sections cover the following topics: the powers of an agent from the society, the definition of an animal, and funding of the society.

Connecticut General Statutes 1902: Sections 2807-2816 Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 2807 - 2816 (1902)

The 1902 General Statutes of Connecticut sections 2807-2816 cover the following topics: definition of an animal, powers of an agent from humane society, and funding of the humane society.

Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 333: Sections 6402-6405 Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 6402-6405 (1918).

Sections 6402-6405 of Chapter 333 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers offences against humanity and morality .  Specifically, the statutes cover following topics: animal cruelty, transportation of animals, and docking of horses.

AU - Conservation and Land Management Act 1984 (WA) Conservation and Land Management Act 1984

An Act to make better provision for the use, protection and management of certain public lands and waters and the flora and fauna thereof, to establish authorities to be responsible therefor, and for incidental or connected purposes.

Uganda - Cruelty - Chapter 220 Animal Act Consolidation of 1988 of Ordinance No. 25 of 1957 as amended last by L.N. No. 224 of 1962 This Uganda act, in English, provides provisions for the offense of animal cruelty. The act also allows the court to order the destruction of an animal when the animal's owner has been convicted of an offense of animal cruelty if the court is satisfied it would be cruel to keep the animal alive. The court may also deprive a person convicted of cruelty ownership of the animal and order for the animal to be disposed as it thinks fit. It is also illegal to permit a diseased animal to be at large in public places; a court may also order a diseased animal at large in any public place to be destroyed. No appeal can be made against either order of destruction. The sale of poisoned grain that is to be used as feeding stuff is also an offence. Also included in this act are provisions about experiments.
AR - Initiatives - Constitutional Amendment 1 (right to hunt) Constitutional Amendment 1 (2010) This resolution proposes to amend the Arkansas Constitution to provide for a constitutional right for citizens of the state of Arkansas to hunt, fish, trap, and harvest wildlife. The resolution states that the right would be limited only by the regulations consistent with Amendment 35 of the Arkansas Constitution. It was passed in 2010 by 82.8% of voters.
MT - Initiatives - Constitutional Amendment 41 Constitutional Amendment 41 (2004) This 2004 ballot measure was an amendment to the constitution proposed by the legislature. The 2003 Legislature submitted this proposal for a vote. It would amend the Montana Constitution by adding a provision specifically to recognize and preserve the opportunity of Montana citizens to harvest wild fish and wild game animals. The amendment specifies that this new provision does not create a right to trespass on private property or diminish any other private rights. This amendment is effective upon approval by the electorate. It was passed in 2004 by 80.6% of voters.
ND - Initiatives - Constitutional Measure 1 (right to hunt) Constitutional Measure 1 (2000) This amendment would provide that hunting, trapping, and fishing are a valued part of residents' heritage and will be preserved for the people and managed by law and regulation for the public good. It passed in 2000 (77% of votes).
EU - Zoos - Council Directive relating to the keeping of wild animals in zoos COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 1999/22/EC

The European Union has adopted common minimum standards for housing and caring for animals in zoos with a view to reinforcing the role of zoos in conserving biodiversity.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 1999/74/EC of 19 July 1999 laying down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens Council Directive 1999/74/EC

This EU council directive lays down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens. In particular, it eliminates battery cages in the EU by 2012 for operations that meet the criteria (establishments with more than 350 laying hens) and creates a registration and reporting system for egg producers.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 1999/74/EC laying down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens Council Directive 1999/74/EC

The Directive lays down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens. It does not apply to establishments with fewer than 350 laying hens or establishments rearing breeding laying hens. Such establishments are, however, subject to the requirements of Directive 98/58/EC.

EU - Research - Council Directive 86/609/EEC regarding the protection of animals used for experimental and other scientific purp Council Directive 86/609/EEC

The European Union has established a framework to protect animals used for experimental or scientific purposes by ensuring that they are adequately cared for and that no unnecessary pain or suffering is inflicted.

EU - Farming - COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 93/119/EC on the protection of animals at the COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 93/119/EC

This directive reflects the EU's concern for a need to establish common minimum standards for the protection of animals at the time of slaughter or killing in order to ensure rational development of production and to facilitate the completion of the internal market in animals and animal products. The directive also states that at the time of slaughter or killing animals should be spared any avoidable pain or suffering.

EU - Transport - Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005

The text sets out to regulate transport of live vertebrate animals within the European Union (EU) where such transport is carried out as part of an economic activity. The aim is to prevent injury or undue suffering to animals and to ensure that they have appropriate conditions that meet their needs.

EU - Farming Council Regulation (EC) No 1099/2009 on the protection of animals at the time of killing Council Regulation (EC) No 1099/2009

This Regulation aims at enhancing protection of animals at the time of slaughter or killing by establishing standard operating procedures, training of personnel, the use of new equipment, etc. Moreover, the objective pursued by this Regulation is to provide a level playing field within the internal market for all operators.

EU - Transport - Council Regulation (EC) No 1255/97 of 25 June 1997 concerning Community criteria for staging points Council Regulation (EC) No 1255/97

The European Union lays down common criteria applicable to control posts (or "staging points") at which animals must be unloaded during long journeys. These rules are designed to ensure the health and welfare of the animals during such stops.

BD - Cruelty - THE CRUELTY TO ANIMALS ACT, 1920 Cruelty to Animals Act, 1920 (Act No. I of 1920)

This Act constitutes Bangladesh's prevention of cruelty to animals act. The act defines "animal" as "any domestic or captured animal." Any person who: overdrives, cruelty or unnecessarily beats, or otherwise ill-treats any animal; binds or carries an animal in a position as to subject the animal to unnecessary pain or suffering; offers or has in his possession an animal that is suffering because of mutilation, thirst, starvation or other ill-treatment shall be punished for every such offence with fine up to one hundred Taka, or imprisonment up to three months, or with both. Overloading an animal is also punishable with a fine or jail term, and animal fighting results in a fine.  

IL - Cruelty - CRUELTY TO ANIMALS LAW (ANIMAL PROTECTION) CRUELTY TO ANIMALS LAW (ANIMAL PROTECTION), 5754-1994

This law represents Isreal's anti-cruelty law. The law provides that no person shall torture, treat cruelly or in any way abuse any animal. It also states that no person shall incite one animal against another or organise a contest between animals. The cutting into live tissue of an animal for cosmetic purposes is also prohibited.

IL - Cruelty - CRUELTY TO ANIMALS REGULATIONS (ANIMAL PROTECTION) (GEESE FORCEFEEDING) CRUELTY TO ANIMALS REGULATIONS (ANIMAL PROTECTION) (GEESE FORCEFEEDING),

The purpose of these Regulations is to prevent the suffering of geese while being force-fed and fattened in order to produce goose liver (fois gras), and to halt the further expansion of the goose liver production's sector in Israel.

CT - Racing - Chapter 226. Gaming Policy, Regulation and Revenue CT ST §§ 12-557-12-586 A person or business organization must have a license in order to conduct a races. The Commissioner of Consumer Protection is the one who grants the licenses. Each town must hold an election approving racing and pari-mutuel wagering in order for a license to be issued. The Commissioner may order random urine testing of race dogs. The Commissioner is also allowed to conduct investigations and hearings in order to carry out the provisions of this statute and is responsible for adopting regulations.
DC - Domestic Violence - Chapter 10. Proceedings Regarding Intrafamily Offenses. DC CODE § 16-1005

This D.C. law provides that if, after a hearing, the judicial officer finds that there is good cause to believe the respondent has committed or threatened to commit a criminal offense against the petitioner or against petitioner's animal or an animal in petitioner's household, the judicial officer may issue a protection order that directs the care, custody, or control of a domestic animal that belongs to petitioner or respondent or lives in his or her household.

DC - Trust for care of animal - Chapter 13. Uniform Trust Code. DC CODE § 19-1304.08

This statute represents the District of Columbia's pet trust law.  The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

DC - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes DC CODE § 22-1001 - 1015

This D.C. statutory section comprises the anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  Whoever knowingly overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, cruelly chains, cruelly beats or mutilates, any animal, or knowingly causes such acts, or one who unnecessarily fails to provide proper food, drink, air, light, space, veterinary care, shelter, or protection from the weather, faces imprisonment up to180 days, or a fine of $250, or both.  Actions that result in serious bodily injury or death to the animal result in felony prosecution with imprisonment not exceeding 5 years or a fine of $25,000, or both.  "Animal" is defined by statute as all living and sentient creatures (human beings excepted).  This section also prohibits animal fighting as either a felony (i.e., wagering or conducting the fight) or a misdemeanor (knowingly being present).

DC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws and Dangerous Dog Provision DC CODE § 8-1801 - 1814; § 8-1821.01- .02; § 8-1831.01; 8-1841.01 - .09; 8-1901 - 1908

These District of Columbia statutes make up the dog laws for the District.  Included among the provisions are definitions, animal control and at large provisions, and vaccinations/licensing regulations.  With regard to dangerous dogs, the term "dangerous animal" means an animal that because of specific training or demonstrated behavior threatens the health or safety of the public.  The Mayor may impound any animal at large or any dangerous animal.  If a dog injures a person while at large, lack of knowledge of the dog's vicious propensity standing alone shall not absolve the owner from a finding of negligence.

DC - Impoundment - § 8-1805. Impoundment DC CODE § 8-1805 Under this law, the Mayor shall make a prompt and reasonable attempt to locate and notify the owner of the impounded animal, including scanning the animal for a microchip. The Mayor shall deem abandoned any animal impounded and not redeemed by its owner within 7 days of impoundment if such animal is wearing identification. Any animal impounded not wearing identification shall be deemed abandoned if not redeemed by its owner within 5 days of impoundment. An animal deemed abandoned shall become the property of the District of Columbia and may be adopted or disposed of in a humane manner.
DC - Exotic Pets - § 8-1808. Prohibited conduct. DC CODE § 8-1808 This DC law outlines things an owner or custodian is prohibited from doing with regard to his or her animal. Among them is that an owner or custodian shall not allow his or her animal to go at large. An owner or custodian shall not leave his or her animal outdoors without human accompaniment or adequate shelter for more than 15 minutes during periods of extreme weather, unless the age, condition, and type of each animal allows the animal to withstand extreme weather (excluding cats). The law also states that a person shall not separate a puppy or a kitten from its mother until the puppy or kitten is at least 6 weeks of age. Certain animals are prohibited from being possessed or sold in the District, which are outlined in subsection (j).
DC - Breeder - Subchapter II. Commercial Licensing Requirement. DC CODE § 8-1821.01 - .02

These D.C. laws require that the Mayor establish licensure requirements for commercial animal breeders in the District of Columbia. The rules must contain requirements as to licensing fees, standards of care, and facility inspection. For the purposes of this section, the term “commercial animal breeder” means any person, firm, organization, or corporation engaged in the operation of breeding and raising more than 25 animals per year for sale or in return for consideration.

DC - Animal Control - Subchapter III. Release of Animals. DC CODE § 8-1831.01

This D.C. law states that no animal shall be released from custody of animal protection except for the purposes of adoption, redemption by the owner of the animal, or other suitable placement in the best interest of the animal. No animals shall be knowingly released from any entity charged with animal protection for the purposes of research, experimentation, testing, or medical instruction or demonstration. Violation is a misdemeanor.

DC - Cruelty - Subchapter V. Classroom Animals. DC CODE § 8-1851.01 to .02

These DC statutes allow animals of appropriate size and temperament be kept in classrooms for instructional purposes. The animals must be provided with sufficient food and water, and be cared for in a safe and humane manner. If the animals are no longer needed, they should be adopted out or given to a local humane organization for adoption.

DC - Disaster - Subchapter VI. Animal Emergency Preparedness. DC CODE § 8-1861.01

This DC law provides that the Mayor must establish an emergency preparedness plan for the protection, sheltering, and evacuation of domestic animals during and following a major disaster or emergency within 90 days of December 5, 2008.

DC - Restaurant - Subchapter VII. Dining with Dogs. DC CODE § 8-1865.01, .02 These laws from 2018 allow food establishments in D.C. to permit dogs in outdoor dining areas of food establishments or unenclosed sidewalk cafés. These establishments must post signage outside that states dogs are permitted along with any restrictions on dogs based on size or temperament. They must also provide an entrance that does not require dogs to enter an indoor dining area or an area in which food is being stored or prepared to access the outdoor dining area and provide patrons with waste bags and a means of proper disposal. Patrons must keep their dog in a carrier or on a leash at all times and never leave the dogs unattended.
DC - Horses - Chapter 20. Horse-Drawn Carriages. DC CODE § 8-2001 - 2013

This DC regulation makes it unlawful to operate a horse-drawn carriage trade without a license and an ID card. The regulations forbid certain types of bits and require that each horse wear a diaper. Horses may not be worked or driven for more than 8 hours a day. Horses must be rested, provided with food and water. A violation of the regulations may result in a fine of $300 (1st offense). A serious intentional injury to the horse by neglect or inhumane treatment shall be fined up to $2,500.

DC - Assistance Animals - Chapter 20A. Pet Ownership Restriction in Assisted Housing. DC Code § 8-2031 - § 8-2035; DC CODE § 7-1002, 1006, 1009; DC CODE § 8-1804

The owner or operator of locally assisted housing accommodations for elderly or disabled people may not prevent a tenant from keeping common household pets. However, an owner or operator may require the removal of pets whose conduct or condition constitutes a threat or nuisance to the health or safety of the other occupants. A violation is a civil infraction that may result in a fine of up to $300.

DC - Wildlife Control - Chapter 22 Wildlife Protection DC CODE § 8-2201 - 2212

The following D.C. statutes provide the legal requirements for wildlife control service providers, which are defined as operators of businesses which involve the charging of a fee for services in wildlife control. Specifically, these statutes provide provisions about capturing target animals and non-target animals, as well as indicating how often a wildlife control service providers must check their traps.

DC - Municipalities - § 1-303.41. Regulations for the keeping, leashing, and running at large of dogs. DC ST § 1-303.41

The following District of Columbia statute allows the council to make and the mayor to enforce regulations regarding leashing dogs in DC.

DC - Cruelty, reporting - § 22-1002.01. Reporting requirements. DC ST § 22-1002.01

This District of Columbia statute requires that any law enforcement or child protective services employee who knows or has reason to suspect than an animal is experiencing cruelty, abandonment, or neglect shall provide a report of the abuse within the speciified time. The statute also states that any employee who observes an animal at the home of a person reasonably suspected of child, adult, or animal abuse should report it. The statute also specifies what information the report must include for completion.

DC - Dogs - § 22-1311. Allowing dogs to go at large. DC ST § 22-1311

The following District of Columbia statute prohibits dogs that the owner knows to be fierce or dangerous, to the danger or annoyance of the inhabitants, from running at large; it also prohibits female dogs in heat to run at large.

CR - Pets - (Decree 31626 on Pet Ownership) Reglamento para la Reproducción y Tenencia Responsable de Animales de Compañía Decree 31626-S (2004)

This Costa Rica law regulates the responsible ownership of pets (text provided in Spanish).

Nigeria - Endangered Species - Endangered Species Act (in English) Decree No. 11 of 1985 The hunting or capture of or trade in animal species listed in the First Schedule to this Act is absolutely prohibited. Furthermore, no person shall hunt, capture, trade in or otherwise deal with an animal species specified in the Second Schedule to this Act except if that person is in possession of a license issued under this Act. The act also sets out the conditions of licenses and permits. The Minister may by an order publish in the Federal Gazette alter the list of animals specified in the First or Second Schedule to this Act by way of addition, substitution or deletion or otherwise. Penalties for violations are also provided.
DECRETO 1248, 1975 Decreto 1248 This Decreto contains the regulations for the safe treatment of live animals during loading, unloading and transportation of livestock. It aims for the humane treatment of animals during transportation and other related options.

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