Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
SC - Bite - § 47-3-110. Liability for attacks by dogs, provoked attacks, trained law enforcement dogs. Code 1976 § 47-3-110 This South Carolina statute provides that if a person is bitten or otherwise attacked by a dog while the person is in a public place or is lawfully in a private place, including the property of the dog owner or person having the dog in the person's care or keeping, the dog owner or person having the dog in the person's care or keeping is liable for the damages suffered by the person bitten or otherwise attacked. If a person provokes a dog into attacking him then the owner of the dog is not liable.
SC - Ordinances - § 47-3-20. Local animal care and control ordinances authorized. Code 1976 § 47-3-20 This South Carolina statute provides that the governing body of each county or municipality in this State may enact ordinances and promulgate regulations for the care and control of dogs, cats, and other animals and to prescribe penalties for violations.
SC - Impound - § 47-3-40. Impoundment or quarantine of cat or dog running at large; release to owner. Code 1976 § 47-3-40 This South Carolina statute provides that the county or municipal animal shelter or animal control officers shall pick up and impound or quarantine any dog running at large. To obtain release of a dog or cat, an owner must prove that the dog or cat is currently inoculated against rabies and also pay an impound or quarantine fee determined by the governing body of the county or municipality.
SC - Impound - § 47-3-540. Destruction of identifiable dog by animal control officer; prior notification of owner Code 1976 § 47-3-540 This South Carolina statute provides that animal control officers must not destroy any positively identifiable dog until they have notified the owner at his or her last known address by registered mail that they have the dog in their possession. The owner then has two weeks to reclaim his or her dog, after which the animal may be destroyed.
SC - Impound - § 47-3-750. Seizure and impoundment of dangerous animal. Code 1976 § 47-3-750 This South Carolina statute provides that if an animal control officer has probable cause to believe that a dangerous animal is being harbored or cared for in violation of Section 47-3-720 or 47-3-740 or 47-3-760(E), or Section 47-3-730, the agent or officer may petition the appropriate court to order the seizure and impoundment of the dangerous animal while the trial is pending.
SC - Exotic Pets - § 47-5-50. Prohibition on sale of wild carnivores as pets; sale of domesticated ferrets. Code 1976 § 47-5-20, § 47-5-50 This South Carolina law provides that no carnivores, which normally are not domesticated, may be sold as pets in this State. A carnivore kept by an individual must not be allowed to run at large and then returned to confinement. A normally wild animal indigenous to this State, if held captive for a period of time, may be released to the wild. This section does not apply to domesticated ferrets. Each business that sells ferrets must also display a notice about the potential danger of unprovoked attacks against humans.
SC - Equine Activity Liability - Article 7. Equine Liability Immunity. Code 1976 § 47-9-710 - 730 This South Carolina section provides that an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional is not liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from an inherent risk of equine activity. The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law. Failure to comply with the requirements concerning warning signs and notices provided in this section prevents an equine activity sponsor or equine professional from invoking the privileges of immunity provided by this article.
SC - Wildlife - § 50-1-125. Wildlife defined; penalties for trafficking in wildlife. Code 1976 § 50-1-125, § 50-1-290 These South Carolina statutes define wildlife as being a wild animal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk, crustacean, or product, egg, offspring, or dead body parts. It is illegal to buy, sell, or possess wildlife except as specifically allowed by this title. A violation is a misdemeanor, and the person could face a fine and/or imprisonment.
SC - Hunting - § 50-1-137. Impeding or obstructing hunting, trapping, fishing, or harvesting of marine Code 1976 § 50-1-137 In South Carolina, it is unlawful for a person wilfully to impede or obstruct another person from lawfully hunting, trapping, fishing, or harvesting marine species. Any person violating the provisions of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor.
SC - Wildlife - § 50-1-270. Liability for gross destruction or injury to wildlife, Code 1976 § 50-1-270 This South Carolina statute provides that any person or public or private entity is liable to the State for the unlawful gross destruction of or injury to wildlife, aquatic life, endangered or threatened species, or the lands or waters owned by the State. For a deliberate or grossly negligent act, the State must be awarded damages of three times the value of the resource affected, plus costs, including attorney's fees. This section does not apply to ordinary agricultural practices.
SC - Exotic Pets - Chapter 16. Importation of Wildlife. Code 1976 § 50-11-1700 - 1950; § 50-16-10 - 70 This South Carolina law states that it is unlawful for a person to import, possess, or transport for the purpose of release or to introduce or bring into this State the following live wildlife: a furbearer which includes but is not limited to, red and gray fox, raccoon, opossum, muskrat, mink, skunk, otter, bobcat, weasel, and beaver; a member of the family Cervidae, a nondomestic member of the families Suidae (pigs), Tayassuidae (peccaries), Bovidae (bison, mountain goat, mountain sheep), coyote, bear, or turkey (genus Meleagris); or a non-native species of fish, crustacean, mollusk, or invertebrate. A permit may be granted only after the investigations and inspections of the wildlife have been made as the department considers necessary and the department approves the possession, transportation, or importation into the State. Sec. 50-11-1765 provides that it is unlawful to sell live wolves or to ship, import, or possess live wolves into this State without a permit.
SC - Fur - Article 12. Trapping Furbearing Animals, Regulation of Dealers, Buyers, Processors, Code 1976 § 50-11-2400 - 2575 In South Carolina, a state hunting license and a commercial fur license are required to sell or take furbearing animals for commercial purposes. Trappers may only set traps during trapping season, must show proof of ownership of property or permission to use property where traps are set, must visit his traps daily, and remove any animals caught in the trap. A violation of these statutes is a misdemeanor, which may result in a fine, imprisonment, and/or revocation of a license.
SC - Hunting - Article 13. Fox and Coyote Hunting Enclosures Code 1976 § 50-11-2600 - 2650 Under these South Carolina statutes, it is unlawful to buy, sell, transfer, possess, or release a live coyote or fox except as permitted. Foxes and coyotes obtained to stock hunting enclosures may be obtained only by the enclosure owner or operator from a South Carolina licensed trapper. A violation of any provision is a misdemeanor; the first offense is punishable by a fine of $50-500, and/or imprisonment up to 30 days.
SC - Leash - § 50-11-780. Dogs engaged in hunting not required to be constrained by leash. Code 1976 § 50-11-780 This South Carolina statute provides that no dog is required to be constrained by a leash while it is actually engaged in hunting game and under supervision. As used in this section "supervision" means that the owner of the dog or his designee is either in the vicinity of the dog or in the process of trying to retrieve the dog.
SC - Hunting - § 50-11-852. Unlawful to molest or kill birds of prey; bald eagles; penalties. Code 1976 § 50-11-852 This statute prohibits the killing of any bird of prey, resulting in a misdemeanor conviction. If the bird is a bald eagle, the individual faces a maximum fine of up to $1,000 and one year in jail in addition to the revocation of hunting privileges for five years.
SC - Hunting, Internet - § 50-11-95. Computer-assisted remote hunting and remote hunting Code 1976 § 50-11-95 This statute makes it illegal to establish or operate computer-assisted remote hunting facilities in South Carolina. It is also illegal to engage in computer-assisted remote hunting if either the animal hunted, or any device, equipment, or software to remotely control the firearm is located in this State. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and may be fined at least $5,000 and/or imprisoned for up to one year.
SC - Endangered Species - Chapter 15. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act Code 1976 § 50-15-10 to 90 These statutes comprise the "South Carolina Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act." Included in the provisions are definitions and criteria related to the listing of endangered species. Violation of the provisions constitutes misdemeanors of varying penalties as well as forfeiture of equipment used in the illegal takings.
SC - Wildlife - Chapter 16. Importation of Wildlife. Code 1976 § 50-16-10 to 70; § 50-11-1765 This set of South Carolina laws relates to the possession of live wildlife. A permit is required for the following: the family Cervidae, a nondomestic member of the families Suidae (pigs), Tayassuidae (peccaries), Bovidae (bison, mountain goat, mountain sheep), coyote, bear, or turkey (genus Meleagris), and a "furbearer," which includes, but is not limited to, red and gray fox, raccoon, opossum, muskrat, mink, skunk, otter, bobcat, weasel, and beaver. However, wildlife imported for exhibition purposes only by state wildlife departments, municipal zoos or parks, public museums, public zoological parks, and public scientific or educational institutions operated not for profit, and transient circuses are not required to procure a permit. Under another section, release of a member of the family Suidae (pig) into the wild is prohibited except as provided by law. Further, it is unlawful for a person to possess, transport, or otherwise bring into the state or release or introduce into the state any diseased wildlife or other animal that reasonably might be expected to pose a public health or safety hazard. Violating any permitting requirement under the chapter results in a misdemeanor with a mandatory fine of not more than $1,000 or up to 6 months imprisonment, or both.
SC - Leash - § 51-3-145. Certain acts unlawful at state parks. Code 1976 § 51-3-145 This South Carolina law contains a dog leash provision that states that it is unlawful for any person to bring a dog or any other animal into the park or facility unless it is crated, caged, or upon a leash not longer than six feet or otherwise under physically restrictive control at all times (see section P). This provision concerns any park or facility under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.
SC - Trust - § 62-7-408. Trust for care of animal Code 1976 § 62-7-408 South Carolina's pet trust law was originally enacted in 2006. A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal or animals alive or in gestation during the settlor's lifetime, whether or not alive at the time the trust is created. The trust terminates upon the death of the last surviving animal.
New Zealand - Animal Welfare - Code for Layer Hens 1999 Code of Animal Welfare No. 18 In New Zealand, hens are kept under conditions ranging from large commercial enterprises where the birds are totally reliant on humans for all their daily requirements to free-ranging hens which have access to outdoor runs or pasture. Provided those concerned with the day-to-day care of the hens treat them with skill and consideration, their welfare can be safeguarded under a variety of management systems. The code takes account of five basic requirements: freedom from thirst, hunger and malnutrition, the provision of appropriate comfort and shelter, the prevention, or rapid diagnosis and treatment, of injury, disease or infection, freedom from distress, and the ability to display normal patterns of behavior.
EU - Farming - Commission Directive 2002/4/EC on the registration of establishments keeping laying hens Commission Directive 2002/4/EC

This EU commission directive concerns Council Directive 1999/74/EC on the registration of establishments keeping laying hens. It mandates that Member States establish a registration system for egg producers covered by Directive 199/74/EC.

AU - Companion Animals - Companion Animals Act 1998 (NSW) Companion Animals Act 1998

The Companion Animals Act, came into effect in September 1998. The Act is designed to benefit pets, their owners and the wider community. Part two of the Act provides for the permanent identification and lifetime registration system which came into effect on 1 July 1999. This was designed to greatly assists authorities in returning lost and injured animals to their owners. It provides NSW councils with a more effective means of keeping track of dogs and cats for the benefit of the wider community. The Act also outlines the requirements when a person is the owner of a ‘controlled dog’ or dangerous breed as well as giving the courts and local councils the ability under legislation to declare a dog ‘dangerous’. The Act also covers nuisance dogs and situations where a dog attack has occurred and the civil liability of dog owners.

Connecticut General Statutes: Title 56: Sections 6480 - 6482n Conn. Gen. Stat. Tit. 56 §§ 6480-6482 (1918) Sections 6480-6482 of Title 56 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers offences against public policy. pecifically, the statutes cover following topics: animal fighting, penalty for attending a fight, and unlawful exhibition of sport for gain.
Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 329: Section 6268 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6268 (1918) Section 6268 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the unlawful injury to certain property of another.  Specifically, the statute states the punishment for hurting, maiming, poisoning anther's cattle, ox, horse, and mule.
Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 331: Section 6367 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6367 (1918). Section 6367 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the transportation of wild animals.  Specifically, the statute establishes the duty of care that must be given to the public when transporting a wild animal.
Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 337: Section 6546 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6546 (1918) Section 6546 of Chapter 337 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers jurisdiction and powers of courts. Specifically, the statute states the power of the court to issue search warrants for animal cruelty.
Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 338: Section 6619 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6619 (1918) Section 6619 of Chapter 338 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers information, procedure and bail. Specifically, the statute states the circumstances for reach a search warrant will be issued.
Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 96: Sections 1879-1886 Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 1879-1886 (1918) Sections 1879-1886 of Chapter 96 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers in general the Humane Society for Connecticut. Specifically, the sections cover the following topics: the powers of an agent from the society, the definition of an animal, and funding of the society.
Connecticut General Statutes 1902: Sections 2807-2816 Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 2807 - 2816 (1902) The 1902 General Statutes of Connecticut sections 2807-2816 cover the following topics: definition of an animal, powers of an agent from humane society, and funding of the humane society.
Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 333: Sections 6402-6405 Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 6402-6405 (1918) Sections 6402-6405 of Chapter 333 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers offences against humanity and morality. Specifically, the statutes cover following topics: animal cruelty, transportation of animals, and docking of horses.
AU - Conservation and Land Management Act 1984 (WA) Conservation and Land Management Act 1984

An Act to make better provision for the use, protection and management of certain public lands and waters and the flora and fauna thereof, to establish authorities to be responsible therefor, and for incidental or connected purposes.

Uganda - Cruelty - Chapter 220 Animal Act Consolidation of 1988 of Ordinance No. 25 of 1957 as amended last by L.N. No. 224 of 1962 This Uganda act, in English, provides provisions for the offense of animal cruelty. The act also allows the court to order the destruction of an animal when the animal's owner has been convicted of an offense of animal cruelty if the court is satisfied it would be cruel to keep the animal alive. The court may also deprive a person convicted of cruelty ownership of the animal and order for the animal to be disposed as it thinks fit. It is also illegal to permit a diseased animal to be at large in public places; a court may also order a diseased animal at large in any public place to be destroyed. No appeal can be made against either order of destruction. The sale of poisoned grain that is to be used as feeding stuff is also an offence. Also included in this act are provisions about experiments.
AR - Initiatives - Constitutional Amendment 1 (right to hunt) Constitutional Amendment 1 (2010) This resolution proposes to amend the Arkansas Constitution to provide for a constitutional right for citizens of the state of Arkansas to hunt, fish, trap, and harvest wildlife. The resolution states that the right would be limited only by the regulations consistent with Amendment 35 of the Arkansas Constitution. It was passed in 2010 by 82.8% of voters.
MT - Initiatives - Constitutional Amendment 41 Constitutional Amendment 41 (2004) This 2004 ballot measure was an amendment to the constitution proposed by the legislature. The 2003 Legislature submitted this proposal for a vote. It would amend the Montana Constitution by adding a provision specifically to recognize and preserve the opportunity of Montana citizens to harvest wild fish and wild game animals. The amendment specifies that this new provision does not create a right to trespass on private property or diminish any other private rights. This amendment is effective upon approval by the electorate. It was passed in 2004 by 80.6% of voters.
ND - Initiatives - Constitutional Measure 1 (right to hunt) Constitutional Measure 1 (2000) This amendment would provide that hunting, trapping, and fishing are a valued part of residents' heritage and will be preserved for the people and managed by law and regulation for the public good. It passed in 2000 (77% of votes).
EU - Zoos - Council Directive relating to the keeping of wild animals in zoos COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 1999/22/EC

The European Union has adopted common minimum standards for housing and caring for animals in zoos with a view to reinforcing the role of zoos in conserving biodiversity.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 1999/74/EC of 19 July 1999 laying down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens Council Directive 1999/74/EC

This EU council directive lays down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens. In particular, it eliminates battery cages in the EU by 2012 for operations that meet the criteria (establishments with more than 350 laying hens) and creates a registration and reporting system for egg producers.

EU - Farming - Council Directive 1999/74/EC laying down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens Council Directive 1999/74/EC

The Directive lays down minimum standards for the protection of laying hens. It does not apply to establishments with fewer than 350 laying hens or establishments rearing breeding laying hens. Such establishments are, however, subject to the requirements of Directive 98/58/EC.

EU - Research - Council Directive 86/609/EEC regarding the protection of animals used for experimental and other scientific purp Council Directive 86/609/EEC

The European Union has established a framework to protect animals used for experimental or scientific purposes by ensuring that they are adequately cared for and that no unnecessary pain or suffering is inflicted.

EU - Farming - COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 93/119/EC on the protection of animals at the COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 93/119/EC

This directive reflects the EU's concern for a need to establish common minimum standards for the protection of animals at the time of slaughter or killing in order to ensure rational development of production and to facilitate the completion of the internal market in animals and animal products. The directive also states that at the time of slaughter or killing animals should be spared any avoidable pain or suffering.

EU - Transport - Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005

The text sets out to regulate transport of live vertebrate animals within the European Union (EU) where such transport is carried out as part of an economic activity. The aim is to prevent injury or undue suffering to animals and to ensure that they have appropriate conditions that meet their needs.

EU - Farming Council Regulation (EC) No 1099/2009 on the protection of animals at the time of killing Council Regulation (EC) No 1099/2009

This Regulation aims at enhancing protection of animals at the time of slaughter or killing by establishing standard operating procedures, training of personnel, the use of new equipment, etc. Moreover, the objective pursued by this Regulation is to provide a level playing field within the internal market for all operators.

EU - Transport - Council Regulation (EC) No 1255/97 of 25 June 1997 concerning Community criteria for staging points Council Regulation (EC) No 1255/97

The European Union lays down common criteria applicable to control posts (or "staging points") at which animals must be unloaded during long journeys. These rules are designed to ensure the health and welfare of the animals during such stops.

BD - Cruelty - THE CRUELTY TO ANIMALS ACT, 1920 Cruelty to Animals Act, 1920 (Act No. I of 1920)

This Act constitutes Bangladesh's prevention of cruelty to animals act. The act defines "animal" as "any domestic or captured animal." Any person who: overdrives, cruelty or unnecessarily beats, or otherwise ill-treats any animal; binds or carries an animal in a position as to subject the animal to unnecessary pain or suffering; offers or has in his possession an animal that is suffering because of mutilation, thirst, starvation or other ill-treatment shall be punished for every such offence with fine up to one hundred Taka, or imprisonment up to three months, or with both. Overloading an animal is also punishable with a fine or jail term, and animal fighting results in a fine.  

IL - Cruelty - CRUELTY TO ANIMALS LAW (ANIMAL PROTECTION) CRUELTY TO ANIMALS LAW (ANIMAL PROTECTION), 5754-1994

This law represents Isreal's anti-cruelty law. The law provides that no person shall torture, treat cruelly or in any way abuse any animal. It also states that no person shall incite one animal against another or organise a contest between animals. The cutting into live tissue of an animal for cosmetic purposes is also prohibited.

IL - Cruelty - CRUELTY TO ANIMALS REGULATIONS (ANIMAL PROTECTION) (GEESE FORCEFEEDING) CRUELTY TO ANIMALS REGULATIONS (ANIMAL PROTECTION) (GEESE FORCEFEEDING),

The purpose of these Regulations is to prevent the suffering of geese while being force-fed and fattened in order to produce goose liver (fois gras), and to halt the further expansion of the goose liver production's sector in Israel.

DC - Domestic Violence - Chapter 10. Proceedings Regarding Intrafamily Offenses. DC CODE § 16-1005

This D.C. law provides that if, after a hearing, the judicial officer finds that there is good cause to believe the respondent has committed or threatened to commit a criminal offense against the petitioner or against petitioner's animal or an animal in petitioner's household, the judicial officer may issue a protection order that directs the care, custody, or control of a domestic animal that belongs to petitioner or respondent or lives in his or her household.

DC - Trust for care of animal - Chapter 13. Uniform Trust Code. DC CODE § 19-1304.08

This statute represents the District of Columbia's pet trust law.  The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

DC - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes DC CODE § 22-1001 - 1015

This D.C. statutory section comprises the anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  Whoever knowingly overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, cruelly chains, cruelly beats or mutilates, any animal, or knowingly causes such acts, or one who unnecessarily fails to provide proper food, drink, air, light, space, veterinary care, shelter, or protection from the weather, faces imprisonment up to180 days, or a fine of $250, or both.  Actions that result in serious bodily injury or death to the animal result in felony prosecution with imprisonment not exceeding 5 years or a fine of $25,000, or both.  "Animal" is defined by statute as all living and sentient creatures (human beings excepted).  This section also prohibits animal fighting as either a felony (i.e., wagering or conducting the fight) or a misdemeanor (knowingly being present).

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