Administrative

Material namesort descending Citation Summary
MN - Veterinarian Issues - Professional Conduct MN ADC 9100.0700 The following acts by a licensed Minnesota veterinarian constitute unprofessional conduct and are grounds for disciplinary action against the licensee.
MO - Breeder - Chapter 9 - Animal Care Facilities. 30-9.010 - 9.030 2 MO ADC 30-9.010 - 9.030 This rule sets forth the standards and requirements for the licensing and operation of animal care facilities in Missouri. For the minimum age to sell or ship a dog or cat, see 30-9020 section (14), subsection (E).
MO - Health - Animal Quarantines 19 MO ADC 20-20.050 This rule provides for the isolation or quarantine of animals with a communicable disease and authorizes the closing of places of public and private assembly as necessary for the protection of public health.
MO - Health - Health Requirements for Movement of Livestock, Poultry and Exotic Animals 2 Mo. Code of State Regulations 30-2.005 - 30-2.090 This set of regulations establishes the health requirements for importing and transporting domestic animals, exotic animals, and household pets.
MO - Hunting, Internet - 3 CSR 10-7.410. Hunting Methods 3 MO ADC 10-7.410 In paragraph (R) of this Missouri regulation, the state prohibits computer-assisted, remote hunting. "Except as otherwise permitted in this Code, wildlife may be taken only in the immediate physical presence of the taker and may not be taken by use of computer-assisted remote hunting devices. . ."
MO - Veterinary - 20 CSR 2270-6.011 Rules of Professional Conduct 20 MO ADC 2270-6.011 Subsection 11 of the Rules of Professional Conduct for veterinarians provides that a licensee shall not reveal confidential, proprietary or privileged facts or data or any other sensitive information contained in a patient's medical records without the prior consent of the client except as otherwise authorized or required by law, regulation, or other order. The subsection specifically states that "[w]hen these situations [of abuse and neglect] cannot be resolved through education, the board considers it the responsibility of the veterinarian to report such cases to the appropriate authorities." Thus, the rule seems to create an ethical responsibility that mandates the reporting of abuse or neglect by veterinarians.
MO - Wildlife - Wildlife Code Definitions 3 Mo. Code of State Regulations 10-20.805 This chapter includes the definitions for the Missouri Wildlife Code.
Montana - Health - 32.3.213. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DOGS AND CATS MT ADC 32.3.213 This Montana regulation states that dogs and cats may enter the state of Montana provided they are accompanied by an official health certificate of the state of origin issued by an accredited veterinarian and officially vaccinated by a licensed veterinarian against rabies in accordance with procedures recommended in the latest version of the U.S. Public Health Compendium for rabies vaccine. Rabies vaccination requirements do not apply to puppies and kittens under three months of age.
MS - Exotic Pets - Rule 32. Public Notice No. 3523.002; Dangerous Wildlife MS ADC 40-2:8.3 The following Mississippi regulations state that it is unlawful for any person to import, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal classified as inherently dangerous by law or regulation unless that person holds a permit or is exempt from holding a permit; these regulations, therefore, also indicate the requirements that must be met in order to obtain either a permit or an exemption. A violation of this act is a Class I violation and any person who has been convicted of a Class I violation shall be fined anywhere between $2,000.00 and $5,000.00, and shall be imprisoned in the county jail for 5 days. The person must also forfeit all hunting, trapping, and fishing privileges for a period of not less than 12 consecutive months from the date of conviction. Additionally, the regulations make provisions about how a wild animal shall be seized when these provisions have been violated.
MT - Exotic Pets - Sub-chapter 22. Exotic Wildlife Mont.Admin.R. 12.6.2201 - 2230 These Montana regulations provide the requirements for care and housing of exotic wildlife. The list of noncontrolled species and prohibited species is also provided.
NC - Disaster - North Carolina Emergency Operations Plan The North Carolina Emergency Operations Plan is published by the North Carolina Department of Public Safety. The plan has a specific section on animal protection that is designed to help protect both domestic and wild animals. In the section on "scope," the plan says that "[a]nimal Protection actions will be aimed at all animals, whether owned, stray, or domestic, that may need help during disaster situations."
NC - Exotic Pets - .0212 Importation Requirements: WIild Animals 2 NC ADC 52B.0212 This North Carolina regulation states that person must obtain a permit from the State Veterinarian before importing any of the following animals into this State: skunk; fox; raccoon; ringtail; bobcat (includes lynx and other North and South American felines as cougars, jaguars, etc.); coyote; marten; brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). Permits for the importation into this State of any of these animals shall be issued only if the animal(s) will be used in a research institute, or for exhibition by a USDA licensed exhibitor, or organized entertainment as in zoos or circuses. Any species or hybrid of a mammal not otherwise covered in the Administrative Code that is found to exist in the wild or naturally occurs in the wild must be accompanied by a valid certificate of veterinary inspection.
NC - Restaurant, animals - 2656 PHYSICAL FACILITIES 15A NC ADC 18A.2656 This North Carolina regulation makes amendments to the Food Code related to dogs and cats in outdoor dining areas. Dogs and cats are allowed in outdoor dining areas provided the dogs or cats are physically restrained and do not pass through the indoor area of the food establishment. All live animals, including pet cats and dogs, are not permitted to come into physical contact with any serving food, serving dishes, tableware, linens, utensils, or other food service items. Employees of a food establishment who prepare or handle food must not physically contact any live animals.
ND - Exotic Pets - Category 3 Species. 48.1-09-06-01. Housing, handling, health, and importation ND ADC 48.1-09-06-01

This North Dakota regulation provides specific rules for Category 3 species of non-traditional livestock. These species include: wild suidae (hogs and pigs); large felids (cats) and hybrids; bears; wolves and wolf-hybrids; venomous reptiles; primates, and nondomestic sheep/goats and their hybrids. Among the provisions include regulations for housing and confinement, importation requirements, and vaccinations.

ND - Rabies - 48.1-13-01-01. Importation requirements - Certificate of veterinary inspection ND ADC 48.1-13-01-01 This North Dakota regulation states that any dog, cat, or ferret over three months of age imported into the state must have a certification of a current rabies vaccination. It also provides other requirements for dog, cat, and ferret importation into the state.
ND - Veterinarian Issues - Professional Conduct ND ADC 87-05-02-01 The following represents unprofessional conduct on behalf of a veterinarian and manifestly disqualifies a licensee from practicing veterinary medicine. Paragraph (8) states that failing to report inhumane treatment to animals, including staged animal fights or training events for fights, the veterinarian reasonably believed occurred constitutes unprofessional conduct.
ND - Wildlife, possession/rehabilitation - Article 48.1-09. Nontraditional Livestock. N.D. Admin. Code § 48.1-09-01-01 - 48.1-09-06-01 This section of North Dakota regulations concerns non-traditional livestock: any nondomestic species held in confinement or which is physically altered to limit movement and facilitate capture. The regulations describe three categories of animals: category 1 - those species generally considered domestic, or not inherently dangerous (such as turkeys, geese, ranch mink, and ducks); category 2 - certain protected species or those species that may pose health risks to humans or animals or may be environmentally hazardous (such as all deer, zebras, and nondomestic cats not listed in category 3); and category 3 - those species determined by the board to pose special concerns, including species which are inherently dangerous or environmentally hazardous (such as nondomestic swine, big cats, bears, wolves, venomous reptiles, primates, and non-domestic sheep and goats). Additionally, a person may not keep a skunk or raccoon in captivity. There are specific licensing requirements for category 2 and 3 species. The owner shall obtain a license from the board before acquiring animals classified as nontraditional livestock category 2 and category 3 species. A license or permit may not be granted by the board until it is satisfied that the provisions for housing and caring for such nontraditional livestock and for protecting the public are proper and adequate and in accordance with the standards prescribed by the board.
NE - Breeder - Chapter 18 - Commercial Dog and Cat Operator Inspection Regulations Neb. Admin. R. & Regs. Tit. 23, Ch. 18, § 001 - 018 This set of Nebraska regulations implements the Commercial Dog and Cat Operator Inspection Act. All persons operating a boarding kennel, pet shop, animal control facility, animal rescue, animal shelter, or acting as a dealer or commercial dog or cat breeder shall have a valid license issued by the Department in accordance with the Act and these regulations.
NE - Disaster - Nebraska Emergency Operations Plan The Nebraska Emergency Management Agency creates the State Emergency Operations Plan (SEOP). According to the NEMA website, "[t]his State Emergency Operations Plan establishes the policies, plans, guidelines and procedures that will allow all our emergency resources to function effectively, as a team, when disaster strikes. In content and in format, the Plan is consistent with the current nationwide concept embodied in the Integrated Emergency Management System (IEMS) in that the Plan provides for performing specific functions across the full spectrum of hazards. Most tasks and capabilities apply across a broad range of hazards. By treating them in that manner we show an integrated approach to disaster management. Unique aspects of certain hazards are addressed separately, where necessary. Therefore, this is truly a multi-hazard functional plan."
NE - Exotic Wildlife - 008 Keeping Wildlife in Captivity 163 NE ADC Ch. 4, § 008 This Nebraska regulation lists species that are unlawful to keep unless a person is issued a Captive Wildlife Permit, a Controlled Shooting Area Permit, a Rehabilitation Permit or a Scientific Collectors Permit, issued by the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission or under a captive cervine permit issued by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture. Captive Wildlife Permits shall not be issued for wild birds or wild mammals which have been taken or removed from the wild. Provisions for public auctions that deal in captive wild bird or mammals are described in 008.004. Importation and exportation of wildlife are also detailed in this rule.
New Zealand - Anmal Welfare - New Zealand Code for Meat Chickens The purpose of this code is to set out the minimum standard of care that owners of meat chickens (broilers) and persons who are in charge of them must achieve order to meet their obligations under the Animal Welfare Act 1999 (the Act). The minimum standards in this code have a legal effect under the Act (see Appendix II: Legislative Requirements). Example indicators do not have a legal effect but can be used to demonstrate whether minimum standards are being met. This code also includes information and recommended best practices which are intended to encourage all those responsible for implementing the code to adopt a standard of husbandry, care and handling exceeding that required by minimum standards.
NH - Commercial breeders - art Agr 1704. Operating Standards Relative to Commercial Kennels NH ADC Agr 1704.01 - 10 These New Hampshire regulations address minimum standards at commercial animal facilities. The regulations cover general aspects (i.e., housing must be structurally sound and maintained in good repair) as well as more specific aspects related to indoor heating/cooling and ventilation requirements. The sizing and construction of primary enclosures and minimal feeding requirements are described.
NH - Exotic Pets - Chapter Fis 800. The Importation, Possession and Use of All Wildlife. NH ADC FIS 802.01 - .05 These New Hampshire regulations state the different permitee categories under Chapter 800 of the New Hampshire Code of Administrative Regulations. These regulations also indicate the penalties for making false statements, when annual permits expire, and who is exempt from the requirements of this chapter.
NH - Exotic Pets - Chapter Fis 800 Definitions (for importation and possession of wildlife) NH ADC FIS 801.01 - 26 These following regulations provide the definitions for the terms used in Chapter Fis 800: The Importation, Possession and Use of All Wildlife of the New Hampshire Code of Administrative Regulations.
NH - Exotic Pets - Part FIS 804. Possession of Wildlife NH ADC FIS 804.01 - .07 Under these New Hampshire regulations, a permit to possess wildlife shall not be required for any person to possess wildlife designated as non-controlled (species such as aquarium fish, amphibians, reptiles except for alligators, crocodiles, and venomous species, many pet birds, small pet mammals like gerbils and hamsters, and certain ungulates). However, no person shall be issued a permit to possess wildlife that has been designated as prohibited. These prohibited species include, among others, zebra mussels, non-indigenous crayfish, walking catfish, and the white amur. A person must possess a permit to possess any live wildlife, or their hybrids, designated as controlled. Table 800.2 lists the controlled species which include many wild turtles and salamanders, alligators, crocodiles, badgers, bears, cougars, coyotes, elephants, kangaroos, big cats, and large primates such as chimpanzees and gorillas. Any person who has legally acquired and possesses wildlife under a valid permit in 1992, and continuously since, and such wildlife is now designated as prohibited or controlled, shall be issued a permit to possess such wildlife.
NH - Importation of Wildlife - Chapter Fis 800. The Importation, Possession and Use of All Wildlife NH ADC FIS 803.01 - .14 These New Hampshire regulations require an importation permit for any controlled species that are imported into the state; these regulations also state that a permit is not required for a non-controlled species, which are listed in the regulations, and that a prohibited species, which are also listed in the regulations, cannot be imported into the state with or without a permit. The regulations also state the requirements for obtaining an importation permit, the provisions for importing certain species, the pathological standards for inspecting imported fish, and what needs to be included in the form to obtain an importation permit.
NH - Pet Shop - Chapter Agr 1700. Transfer of Animals and Birds. N.H. Code Admin. R. Agr 1701.01 - 1703.02 These rules establish standards for the regulation of animal health and welfare that are consistent with the pattern established in statute by the Legislature. Animal health regulation focuses on those conditions that pose a threat to public health, that would require regulatory intervention to protect the economy of the state, or both.
NJ - Endangered Species - Subchapter 4. Endangered, Nongame and Exotic WIildlife N.J. Admin. Code tit. 7, § 25-4.1 - 20

This set of New Jersey regulations first defines "exotic mammal, bird, reptile or amphibian” as any nongame species or mammal, bird, reptile or amphibian not indigenous to New Jersey. Except as provided, no person shall possess any nongame species or exotic species of any mammal, bird, reptile or amphibian unless such person has first received both the appropriate permit from the Department of Environmental Protection. Some exotic species that require a permit for possession include ferrets, pythons, and monitors. Permit fees range from $10 for the individual hobby to $100 for an animal dealer. The regulations also define a "potentially dangerous species” as any exotic mammal, bird, reptile or amphibian or nongame species which is capable of inflicting serious or fatal injuries or which has the potential to become an agricultural pest or a menace to the public health or indigenous wildlife populations. Some of these species include non-domestic dogs, baboons, monkeys, bears, non-domestic cats, gila monsters, alligators, and ground squirrels.

NJ - Livestock - Chapter 8. Humane Treatment of Domestic Livestock. N.J. Admin. Code tit. 2, § 8-1.1 - 8.7 This subchapter establishes humane standards for the humane raising, treatment, care, marketing, and sale of cattle, pursuant to the authority accorded by N.J.S.A. 4:22-16.1.
NM - Disaster Planning - New Mexico Emergency Operations Plan The New Mexico All-Hazard Emergency Operations Plan has an Emergency Support Function (ESF) that deals with animal safety provisions. In addition to food safety, livestock, and zoonotic disease concerns, the plan addresses the "safety and well-being of household pets, service animals, farm animals, and zoo animals during an emergency response or evacuation situation."
NM - Exotic Pets - 19.35.7. Importation of Live Nondomestic Animals Birds and Fish N.M. Admin. Code 19.35.7 This regulation covers persons who desire to bring wildlife species into the state of New Mexico. It may include the general public, pet importers, holders of Class A park licenses, department permitees and others. The stated objective is, "[t]o provide consistent criteria for the importation of live non-domesticated animals into New Mexico and to protect native wildlife against the introduction of contagious or infectious diseases, undesirable species and address human health and safety issues."
NM - Rehabilitation, wildlife - 19.35.5. Wildlife Rehabilitation Permits 19.35.5 NMAC The stated objective of this regulation is to establish and implement a system for the issuance and use of permits for the rehabilitation of sick, injured, orphaned or otherwise incapacitated wildlife for return to the wild or other authorized disposition in New Mexico.
NM - Scientific - 19.35.6. Authorized Uses of Wildlife for Education, Law Enforcement, Research and Scientific Purposes 19.35.6 NMAC This New Mexico rule issued by the department of game and fish and all persons provides information on the taking and possession of protected wildlife for scientific and educational purposes.
NV - Disaster Planning - State Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (SCEMP)

According to the Division of Emergency Management - Homeland Security, "The objective of the State Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (SCEMP) is to reduce the possible consequences of an emergency by preventing loss of life and injuries; reducing damage to infrastructure, buildings, and homes; thus accelerating the resumption of normal daily life activities; and to the maximum extent possible, protect the environment." The plan contains several references to both service animals and household pets, which are excerpted below.

NV - Exotic Animals - Possession, Transportation, Importation, Exportation and Release of Wildlife NV ADC 503.108 - 140 These Nevada regulations concern the restrictions on importation, transportation and possession of certain species. Under 503.110, the importation, transportation or possession of the species of live wildlife or hybrids thereof including, but not limited to, freshwater sharks, piranhas, alligators and caimans, mongooses and meerkats, coyotes, and wild dogs is prohibited. Exemptions include zoos, aquariums, limited duration entertainment or commercial photography, research or scientific use, and a tax-exempt nonprofit organization that exhibits wildlife solely for educational or scientific purposes. Some animals may be possessed, transported, imported and exported without a permit or license issued by the Department such as monkeys and other primates, elephants, all felines, except mountain lions and bobcats, and wolves, among others.
NV - Exotic Wildlife - NAC 504.471 Restrictions on shipment, transportation and exportation of wildlife NV ADC 504.471 This administrative provision restricts the shipment, transportation and exportation of wildlife subject to limited exceptions.
NV - Rabies - 441A.435. Owner required to maintain dog, cat or ferret currently vaccinated NV ADC 441A.435 This Nevada regulation states that an owner of a dog, cat or ferret shall maintain the dog, cat or ferret currently vaccinated against rabies in accordance with the provisions of this section and the recommendations set forth in the Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control, 2008 edition, published by the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. A licensed veterinarian may exempt a dog, cat or ferret from vaccination for health reasons.
NV - Rabies - Chapter 441A. Infectious Diseases; Toxic Agents NV ADC 441A.410 to 445

NAC 441A.410 Appointment of rabies control authority; ordinance providing for rabies control program; authority of county, city or town to require licenses for dogs, cats and ferrets; duty of county, city or town to provide certain information to State Health Officer or repres

NV - Wildlife - Chapter 504. Wildlife Management and Propagation. This administrative provision restricts the shipment, transportation and exportation of wildlife subject to limited exceptions.
NV- Rehabilitation, wildlife - Chapter 504. Wildlife Management and Propagation. NV ADC 504.492 - 498 These Nevada regulations are about permits to rehabilitate wildlife. These regulations reveal where an application for a wildlife rehabilitation permit can be obtained, what must be included on the application, where to return the application, the required documents that must also be submitted with the application, the expiration of the permit, and the roles and the responsibilities of the permit holder. Additionally, the following regulations also provide information about euthanizing wildlife that is not listed as endangered or threatened species, as well as how to euthanize a species that is listed as endangered or threatened.
NY - Endangered Species - Part 182. Endangered and Threatened Species of Fish and Wildlife 6 NY ADC 182..1 - .16 This set of New York regulations concerns endangered, threatened, and species of special concern. Section 182.5 provides a list of native species listed as endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Under Section 182.7, the department may issue a license to a person to transport, sell, import and/or possess a listed species for purposes it deems legitimate.
NY - Horse Racing - Section 4002.1. Occupational licenses 9 NY ADC 4002.1 Sec. 4002.1 requires that anyone participating in any thoroughbred race meet as a managing owner, racing owner, trainer, assistant trainer, jockey, apprentice jockey, jockey agent, veterinarian, farrier, stable employee, track supplier, equipment supplier, salesman, agent or operator of any concession to have an occupational license issued by the New York State Racing and Wagering Board.
NY - Horse Racing - Section 4002.21. License requirements for assistant trainer 9 NY ADC 4002.21 An assistant trainer's license may be issued to a person who is 18 years old, has three years of experience, is vouched for by the trainer by whom he or she is to be employed, and passes a written exam (or oral) and a practical exam.
NY - Horse Racing - Section 4002.22. License qualifications for trainer 9 NY ADC 4002.22 The qualifications for an initial trainer's license are 12 months as a licensed assistant trainer in NY, or 12 months in another jurisdiction with a certificate from track stewards in that state.
NY - Horse Racing - Section 4002.23. License qualifications for private trainer 9 NY ADC 4002.23 A private trainer's license may be issued to an applicant who has an ownership or lease interest in a horse exceeding 50 percent if that person has been a licensed owner for one year, has three years of experience with Thoroughbred racehorses, and passes written and practical exams.
NY - Horse Racing - Section 4002.8. Qualifications for license 9 NY ADC 4002.8 If the New York State Racing and Wagering Board finds that an applicant meets the criteria for financial responsibility, experience, character and fitness, then it will issue an occupational license to that person.
NY - Horse Racing - Section 4043.2. Restricted use of drugs, medication and other substances 9 NY ADC 4043.2 This regulation states which drugs and medications are permitted to be used in racehorses in New York, and how and when they may be administered.
NY - Horse Racing - Section 4117.1. Drive to finish 9 NY ADC 4117.1 Every race must be contested by every horse in the race and every horse must be driven to the finish.
NY - Rehabilitators, wildlife - Part 184. Wildlife Rehabilitators. 6 NY ADC 184.1 - 7 These New York regulations concern the qualifications for appointment as a state wildlife rehabilitator. Section 184.1 first states that, "The purpose of this Part is to establish a specially trained group of individuals, collectively called wildlife rehabilitators, to provide for the care of injured and debilitated wildlife so that such wildlife may be returned to the wild." Under the chapter, "wildlife rehabilitation" means the practice of providing care for injured or debilitated wildlife, including their capture, housing, feeding, emergency treatment and release to the wild.
NY - Wild animal, possession - Part 820. Required Annual Reporting of the Presence of Wild Animals 19 NY ADC 820.1 to .3 This set of New York regulations provides a form for individuals keeping wild animals to report with the city, town or village clerk within whose jurisdiction the animal is owned, possessed or harbored, on or before April 1st of each year. General Municipal Law (GML), section 209-cc requires the State Fire Administrator, in consultation with the Department of Environmental Conservation, to develop and maintain a list of the common names of wild animals that are reported annually to local authorities.

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