Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
NJ - Pet Sales - Pet Purchase Protection Act N. J. S. A. 56:8-92 to 56:8-97 This New Jersey Act protects pet purchasers who receive "defective" companion animals. A purchaser of a defective pet must have his or her pet examined by a veterinarian within 14 days of purchase to receive a refund or exchange. Alternatively, a buyer may retain the pet and be reimbursed for veterinary bills up to two times the cost of the dog or cat.
NJ - Pet Trusts - Trusts for care of domesticated animals N.J.S.A. 3B:31-24 A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal. Note: this section replaces the original law (3B:11-38) enacted in 2001 and repealed in 2016.
NJ - Research - 18A:3B-85. Use of cats or dogs for educational, research, or scientific purposes; assessment N. J. S. A. 18A:3B-85 The “Homes for Animal Heroes Act" adopted in 2020 states that an institution of higher education that uses cats or dogs for educational, research, or scientific purposes, or a research institution that contracts with an institution of higher education for the use of cats or dogs for educational, research, or scientific purposes, shall require the assessment of the health of a cat or dog and determine whether it is suitable for adoption after the completion of any testing or research involving the cat or dog. If the institution determines that the cat or dog is suitable for adoption, the institution shall offer the cat or dog to an animal rescue organization or private individual for adoption.
NJ - Veterinary - Chapter 16. Veterinary Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry. NJSA 45:16-1 to 45:16-18 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
NM - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws NMSA 1978, § 28-7-3 to 28-7-5; § 28-11-1 to 28-11-6; § 77-1-15.1; § 65-7-16 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NM - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes NMSA 1978, § 30-18-1 to 30-18-16; NMSA 1978, § 77-18-2 to 4 This section comprises the New Mexico anti-animal cruelty provisions. As used in this section, "animal" does not include insects or reptiles. Cruelty to animals occurs when a person mistreats, injures, kills without lawful justification or torments an animal or abandons or fails to provide necessary sustenance to an animal under that person's custody or control. Extreme cruelty to animals, a fourth-degree felony, consists of a person intentionally or maliciously torturing, mutilating, injuring or poisoning an animal or maliciously killing an animal. Upon conviction, the court may order a person to participate in an animal cruelty prevention program or an animal cruelty education program, or to obtain psychological counseling for treatment of a mental health disorder.
NM - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-10 This New Mexico statute provides that it is unlawful for any person to keep any animal known to be vicious and liable to attack or injure human beings unless such animal is securely kept to prevent injury to any person. It is also unlawful to keep any unvaccinated dog or cat or any animal with any symptom of rabies or to fail or to refuse to destroy vicious animals or unvaccinated dogs or cats with symptoms of rabies.
NM - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws NMSA 1978, § 3-18-3; § 77-1-1 - 20; § 77-1A-1 - 6; § 77-1B-1 - 12; § 25-1-15 These statutes comprise New Mexico's dog laws. Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, vaccination requirements, and provisions related to dangerous dogs.
NM - Dog Bite - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-6 This short New Mexico statute provides that state health department shall prescribe regulations for the reporting of animal bites, confinement and disposition of rabies-suspect animals, rabies quarantine and the disposition of dogs and cats exposed to rabies, in the interest of public health and safety.
NM - Endangered Species - Chapter 17. Game and Fish and Outdoor Recreation. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 17-2-37 to 17-2-46 These statutes comprise the New Mexico Wildlife Conservation Act. Included in the provisions are definitions related to the statute, legislative policies, and regulations for listing or delisting species. Violation of the Act constitutes a misdemeanor and can incur a penalty from $50 - 1,000 depending on the categorization of the species taken.
NM - Equine Activity Liability - Article 13. Equine Liability NMSA 1978, § 42-13-1 to 42-13-5 This act stipulates that any person, corporation or partnership is immune from liability for the death or injury of a rider, which resulted while the rider was engaged in an equine activity. However, there are exceptions to this rule: a person, corporation, or partnership will be held liable for injuries if he or she displays a conscious, reckless, or intentional disregard for the safety of the rider, and if the person, corporation, or partnership fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the rider.
NM - Exotic Pets - § 77-18-1. Sale, purchase, trade and possession of certain animals regulated NMSA 1978, § 77-18-1 This New Mexico law states that the sale, purchase, trade and possession with intent to keep as a pet of any subhuman primate, skunk, raccoon, fox or other sylvatic carnivore may be regulated by regulation of the health and environment department [department of health] for the protection of public health and safety.
NM - Fur/Trapping - Article 5. Trappers and Fur Dealers NMSA 1978, § 17-5-1 to 17-5-9 These New Mexico statutes regulate trappers and fur dealers. Fur-bearing animals, such as muskrat, mink, weasel, beaver, otter, nutria, masked or blackfooted ferret, ringtail cat, raccoon, pine marten, coatimundi, badgers, bobcat and foxes, may only be taken during certain seasons or with a permit and/or a license. Fur dealers must have a license to buy or sell skins. A violation of the statutes is a misdemeanor.
NM - Hunting - Chapter 17. Game and Fish and Outdoor Recreation. NMSA 1978, § 17-2-7.1 This law represents New Mexico's hunter harassment provision. It is unlawful for a person to commit interference with another person who is lawfully hunting, trapping or fishing in an area where hunting, trapping or fishing is permitted by a custodian of public property or an owner or lessee of private property. A first offense is a petty misdemeanor; a second or subsequent offense is a misdemeanor. This section does not apply to a farmer or rancher in pursuit of his or her normal farm or ranch operation or law enforcement officer in pursuit of his or her official duties.
NM - Hunting - § 17-3-49. Computer-assisted remote hunting prohibited; penalties NMSA 1978, § 17-3-49 This law makes it illegal to engage in computer-assisted remote hunting, provide facilities for that purpose, create or advertise such software or websites, or keep an animal confined for computer-assisted remote hunting. Violation also leads to a revocation of licenses issued by the state game commission.
NM - Impound - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-17 This New Mexico statute provides that the owner or operator of a veterinary clinic or hospital, a doctor of veterinary medicine, a kennel, grooming parlor or other animal care facility is not liable for disposing of abandoned animals after proper notice has been sent to the owner of record.
NM - Invasive Species - Chapter 17. Game and Fish and Outdoor Recreation. NMSA 1978, § 17-4-35 These New Mexico statutes pertain to controlling aquatic invasive species. If a conveyance or equipment has been in an infested water body, the owner must decontaminate it or have it inspected and certified prior to entering another water body in the state. Law enforcement officers must take action to prevent infested equipment from entering water bodies, and may impound equipment if the person transporting it refuses to submit to an inspection and the officer has reason to believe that an aquatic invasive species may be present.
NM - Licenses - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-15.1 This New Mexico statute provides that every municipality and each county may provide by ordinance for the mandatory licensure of dogs over the age of three months. License fees shall be fixed by the responsible municipality or county. Further, pursuant to this statute, every municipality and each county shall provide for the impoundment of rabies-suspect animals.
NM - Ordinances - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-12 This New Mexico statute provides that each municipality and each county shall make provision by ordinance for the seizure and disposition of dogs and cats running at large and not kept or claimed by any person on their premises provided that it does not conflict with state law.
NM - Pet Trusts - Chapter 46A. Uniform Trust Code. NMSA 1978, §46A-4-408 Section 46A-4-408, was adopted in 2003, and did not repeal the previous pet trust law. However, in 2016, the original pet trust law (46A-4-407) was finally repealed. The new section follows the language of the Uniform Trust Code and simply states that a trust for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime is valid. The trust terminates upon the death of the last animal named and any excess trust property is distributed to the settlor, if living, or his or her successors in interest.
NM - Pigs, feral - § 77-18-6. Feral hogs; prohibition; penalty NMSA 1978, § 77-18-6 This New Mexico law prohibits the importation, transportation, holding for breeding, releasing, or selling of a sell a live feral hog or the operation of a commercial feral hog hunting enterprise. Any person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000) or by imprisonment for a definite term of less than one year or both.
NM - Police Animals - § 13-6-1. Disposition of obsolete, worn-out or unusable tangible personal property NMSA 1978, § 13-6-1 This New Mexico statute concerns tangible personal property of governing local and state agencies. Paragraph L deals with retired K-9 dogs. The section states, "[i]f the secretary of public safety finds that the K-9 dog presents no threat to public safety, the K-9 dog shall be released from public ownership as provided in this subsection. The K-9 dog shall first be offered to its trainer or handler free of charge. If the trainer or handler does not want to accept ownership of the K-9 dog, then the K-9 dog shall be offered to an organization described in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 free of charge. If both of the above fail, the K-9 dog shall only be sold to a qualified individual found capable of providing a good home to the animal."
NM - Property - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-1 Dogs, cats and domestic birds are considered personal property in New Mexico.
NM - Veterinary - Article 14. Veterinary Practice Act. NMSA 1978, § 61-14-1 to 61-14-20 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
NM - Wild Horses - § 77-18-5. Wild horses; conformation, history and deoxyribonucleic acid testing NMSA 1978, § 77-18-5 This New Mexico law states that a wild horse that is captured on public land shall have its conformation, history and deoxyribonucleic acid tested to determine if it is a Spanish colonial horse. If it is a Spanish colonial horse, the wild horse shall be relocated to a state or private wild horse preserve created and maintained for the purpose of protecting Spanish colonial horses. If it is not a Spanish colonial horse, it shall be returned to the public land, relocated to a public or private wild horse preserve or put up for adoption by the agency on whose land the wild horse was captured.
NM - Wildlife - Article 15. Predatory Wild Animals and Rodent Pests NMSA 1978, § 77-15-1 to 77-15-14 The New Mexico County Predatory Control Act deals with predatory wild animals and rodent pests. On federal lands, the federal government pays for rodent pest repression. On public federal or state lands, the state and federal cooperative funds pay for rodent pest repression. On private land, rodent pest repression is based on voluntary cooperation of owners, but if the owner fails, after written notice, to destroy the prairie dogs, the state rodent inspector is authorized to enter the lands and destroy the prairie dogs at the expense of the owner. Any person who interferes with the rodent inspector is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of $100 to $500.
NO - Aquaculture - Regulation concerning Transportation of Aquaculture Animals Chapters 1 - 6 , Regulation concerning Transportation of Aquaculture Animals

The purpose of this regulation is to promote good aquatic animal health and ensure good fish welfare during transportation.

NO - Aquaculture - Regulation pertaining to Establishing and Expanding Aquaculture Establishments, Pet Shops, etc. § 1 - 13, Regulation pertaining to Establishing and Expanding Aquaculture Establishments, Pet Shops, etc.

The purpose of this regulation is to promote good aquatic animal health and ensure good fish and decapod welfare.

NO - Aquaculture - Regulations concerning abattoirs and processing plants for aquaculture animals Chap. 1 - 5, Regulations concerning abattoirs and processing plants for aquaculture animals

The purpose of these regulations is to promote good health in aquaculture animals and ensure good fish welfare.

NO - Aquaculture - Regulations relating to Operation of Aquaculture establishments Chapters 1 - 5, Regulations relating to Operation of Aquaculture establishments

The purpose of these Regulations is to contribute to the sustainable development of the aquaculture industry and to its development as a profitable, competitive and viable coastal industry. The purpose is also to promote good health in aquaculture animals and ensure good fish welfare.

Northern Ireland - Animal Welfare - Welfare of Animals Act (Northern Ireland) 2011 2011 CHAPTER 16 An Act establishing penalties for engaging in certain activities that are considered detrimental to animal welfare in Northern Ireland. Activities that constitute offences include: causing an animal unnecessary suffering, mutilating an animal’s body, docking a dog’s tail (with certain limited exceptions), administering a poisonous or injurious substance to an animal, and engaging in or attending an animal fight. Activities lawfully done under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, and the normal course of fishing, hunting and (hare) coursing are exempt from the 2011 Act. Hare coursing events have since been banned in separate legislation.
Northern Ireland - Farm animal - Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2012 2012 No. 156 Regulations placing duties on persons responsible for farmed animals, to include: the conditions under which animals are kept; and specific conditions for laying hens, reared meat chickens, caves, cattle, pigs and rabbits.
Northern Ireland - Wildlife - Conservation (Natural Habitats etc.) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1995 1995 No. 380 These Regulations prohibit the deliberate taking, injuring, killing, disturbing, possession, or trading of certain wild species (as scheduled) in Northern Ireland. It is also an offence to take the nests or eggs of wild birds.
Northern Ireland - Wildlife - Wildlife and Natural Environment Act (Northern Ireland) 2011 2011 Chapter 15 This Act provides various protections to certain wild animals, and prohibits facilitating, attending or participating in hare coursing events.
Northern Ireland - Zoo Licensing - The Zoo Licensing Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003 2003 No. 115 Regulations licensing the conduct of zoo facilities in Northern Ireland (similar to the Zoo Licensing Act 1981 that applies to England, Wales and Scotland). Covers permanent establishments where animals are on display to the public, for seven days a year or more. License requirements address matters of animal welfare, conservation and public education.
Noway - Cruelty - Norwegian Animal Welfare Act (2010) Norwegian Animal Welfare Act

This comprehensive Animal Welfare Act from Norway covers nearly all aspects in the treatment of animals, including research, farming, and general care.  The intention of this Act is to promote good animal welfare and respect for animals.

NV - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N. R. S. 118.105; 426.097; 426.099; 426.510, 426.515; 426.695; 426.790;426.800; 426.805; 426.810; 426.820; 484B.290; 613.330; 651.075; 704.145; and 706.366 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NV - Bestiality - 201.455. Bestiality; penalties N.R.S. 201.455 This Nevada law, enacted in 2017, prohibits bestiality. Convicted violators face the relinquishing and permanently forfeiting ownership or possession of all animals which are in the same household as the person to an animal shelter, an organization that takes into custody animals which have been abused or neglected, or a society for the prevention of cruelty to animals. The court may also impose a possession ban on owning or keeping any animal for a period determined by the court. Those convicted must undergo a psychological evaluation and any recommended counseling and must pay all reasonable costs incurred for the care and maintenance of the animal involved in the crime and any other animal relinquished by the person. If the person convicted of the crime of bestiality is not the owner of the animal involved in the crime, reimbursing the owner of the animal for all medical expenses incurred for treating the animal.
NV - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes N. R. S. 574.010 to 574.550; N.R.S. 202.487; N.R.S. 201.455 This comprehensive section comprises the Nevada anti-cruelty statutes. The section first empowers private prevention of cruelty to animals societies and outlines their powers and responsibilities, including the power to arrest. Under this section, "animal" does not include the human race, but includes every other living creature. Animal cruelty, as described in Section 574.100, prohibits the overdriving, overloading, torture, cruel beating or unjustifiable injuring, maiming, mutilation or killing of an animal, as well as the deprivation of necessary sustenance, food or drink. The first offense under this section is a misdemeanor with enhancement to a felony for a third or subsequent convictions. Animals fighting is also prohibited under the section, with enhanced sentences for subsequent convictions. Other specific crimes include mistreatment of dogs, abandonment of animals, poisoning (although the section does not prohibit the destruction of "noxious animals"), and basic requirements for the care of dogs and cats kept in kennels or sold by pounds or pet shops.
NV - Damages, pet - 41.740. Damages for which person who kills or injures pet N.R.S. 41.740 This Nevada law provides that if a "natural person" intentionally, willfully, recklessly or negligently injures or kills the pet of another natural person, the person is liable for (a) the cost of veterinary care incurred because of the injury or death of the pet; (b) any reduction in market value of the pet caused by the injury; (c) the market value and reasonable burial expenses if the pet is killed; and (d) reasonable attorney's fees and costs incurred in bringing an action under this section. All the damages must not exceed $5,000 per pet. There are several exceptions under the law. A pet is defined as any domesticated dog or cat normally maintained in or near the household of its owner.
NV - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 202. Crimes Against Public Health and Safety. N. R. S. 202.500 This Nevada statute defines a "dangerous dog," as a dog, that without provocation, on two separate occasions within 18 months, behaved menacingly to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend him or herself against substantial bodily harm, when the dog is either off the premises of its owner or keeper or not confined in a cage or pen. A dog then becomes "vicious" when, without being provoked, it killed or inflicted substantial bodily harm upon a human being. If substantial bodily harm results from an attack by a dog known to be vicious, its owner or keeper is guilty of a category D felony. Under the statute, a dog may not be declared dangerous if it attacks as a defensive act against a person who was committing or attempting to commit a crime or who provoked the dog.
NV - Disaster - Chapter 414. Emergency Management. General Provisions. N. R. S. 414.095 and 414.097 In Nevada, an emergency management plan must address the needs of persons with pets or service animals during and after an emergency or disaster.
NV - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws N. R. S. 193.021; N. R. S. 202.500; N. R. S. 206.150; N. R. S. 244.359; N. R. S. 269.225; N. R. S. 289.595; N. R. S. 503.631, 636; N. R. S. 568.370; N.R.S. 574.600 - 670; N.R.S. 575.020 These statutes comprise Nevada's dog laws. Among the provisions include a link to proper care requirements for companion animals, animal control ordinance provisions, and the dangerous dog law among others.
NV - Dog Ordinance - 244.359. Ordinance concerning control of animals N. R. S. 244.359 This Nevada statute provides that each board of county commissioners may enact and enforce an ordinance related to dogs including licensing, regulating or prohibiting the running at large and disposal of all kinds of animals, establishing a pound, designating an animal as inherently dangerous and requiring the owner of such an animal to obtain a policy of liability insurance, among other things.
NV - Domestic Violence - Chapter 33. Injunctions. Orders for Protection Against Domestic Violence. N. R. S. 33.018, 33.030 In Nevada, a knowing, purposeful or reckless course of conduct intended to harass the other such as injuring or killing an animal, is included in their definition of Domestic Violence. A victim can then get a Protection Order and enjoin the adverse party from physically injuring, threatening to injure or taking possession of any animal that is owned or kept by the applicant or minor child, either directly or through an agent.
NV - Eagle - Chapter 503. Hunting, Fishing and Trapping; N.R.S. 503.610 Nevada has a law that specifically protects both bald (American) and golden eagles. The statute makes it illegal to possess or capture by whatever means either species. The law does allow for the taking of an eagle pursuant to permit only if the eagle has seriously injured agricultural or other interests, provided it is consistent with federal law and no other alternative is appropriate.
NV - Endangered Species - Protection and Propagation of Native Fauna (Chapter 503) N. R. S. 503.584 - 503.589 These statutes provide that the Legislature of Nevada has an interest in protecting native species from extinction and sets forth the authority to establish programs to protect designated species. However, if a native species is found to be destructive under the statute, the statute provides for removal if appropriate. Under statute, the ultimate responsibility for management rests with the governor for reviewing state programs and entering into interstate and federal agreements.
NV - Equine Activity - Limitations on liability; duties of a participant in an equine activity; exceptions; definitions Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 41.519 This Nevada statute limits the liability of equine sponsors and professionals, veterinarians, or any other person, for an injury to or death of a participant as a result of an inherent risk of equine activity. The statute also provides the duties that equine activity participants must complete. Finally, the statute provides the exceptions for when a person is not immune from civil liability under the statute and the definition of terms used within the statute.
NV - Horses, wild - 504.490. Unlawful acts; penalty N.R.S. 504.490 This Nevada law prohibits any unauthorized person from doing certain acts with regard to wild horses such as removing them from public lands, harassing wild horses, or using aircraft or a motor vehicle to hunt wild horses (among other listed actions). Violation is a gross misdemeanor. A person who willfully and maliciously kills a wild horse is guilty of a category C felony.
NV - Housing - 116.318. Right of units’ owners to keep pet N. R. S. 116.318 This Nevada law enacted in 2019 states that the executive board of an association shall not and the governing documents of that association must not prohibit a unit's owner from keeping at least one pet within such physical portion of the common-interest community as that owner has a right to occupy and use exclusively.

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