Dangerous Dog: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
Canada - Ontario - Dog Owners' Liability Act R.S.O. 1990, c. D.16, s. 1 - 20(4) This Ontario, Canada set of laws comprises the Dog Owners' Liability Act. The main thrust of the law is to establish that an owner is liable for damages if his or her dog bites or attacks another person or domestic animal. Proceedings may be commenced in the Ontario Court of Justice against an owner of a dog if it is alleged that the dog attacked or bitten another person or domestic animal, or if the dog has behaved in a manner that poses a menace to the safety of persons or domestic animals. A court may then order the destruction of the dog, or measures for more effective control of the dog (leash restraint, muzzling, etc.). The Act also bans the owning, breeding, importing, or transferring of pit bull dogs in Ontario, save for dogs grandfathered in before the Act took effect in 2005 (then the dog is a "restricted pit bull" subject to further laws).
Canada - Nova Scotia Statutes - Sheep Protection Act R.S.N.S. 1989, c. 424, s. 1 - 18(4) This set of Nova Scotia laws comprises the Sheep Protection Act. Under the Act, any person may kill any dog which is found pursuing, worrying, wounding, killing or injuring sheep or is found straying at any time, and not under proper control, upon premises where sheep are usually kept. Within forty-eight hours after an owner discovers that one or more of his or her sheep have been killed or injured by a dog or dogs, he or she shall notify a sheep valuer who immediately makes a report in writing giving in detail the extent and amount of the damage. Where a dog is known to have killed or injured sheep, the owner on being duly notified shall within forty-eight hours cause the dog to be killed.
Canada - Northwest Territories Statutes/Nunavut - Dog Act R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. D-7, s. 1 This set of laws comprises the Northwest Territories Dog Act. Under the Act, owners may not allow their dogs to run loose and must provide them with sufficient food and water. Further, the law provides that no person shall punish or abuse a dog in a manner or to an extent that is cruel or unnecessary or drive a dog or dog team on a sidewalk situated on the street or road of a settlement. The law also sets forth the procedure for the impoundment and release of dogs. For the latest version of this Act, see the pdf.
Canada - New Brunswick Statutes. Sheep Protection Act R.S.N.B. 1973, c. S-7, s. 1 - 6 This set of New Brunswick laws comprises the Sheep Protection Act. Under the Act, where a sheep is killed or injured by a dog, the owner of the sheep may, within forty-eight hours, notify the Minister. The Minister then appoints an investigator who reports his or her findings back to the Minister. The Minister may then recover the expenses of the investigation from the owner of the dog, and may order the destruction of the dog.
Canada - Manitoba Statutes. The Animal Liability Act S.M. 1998, c. 8 [C.C.S.M., c. A95], as am. S.M. 2002, c. 24, s. 4; 2002, c. This set of laws comprises the Manitoba Animal Liability Act. Under the Act, the owner of an animal is liable for damages resulting from harm that the animal causes to a person or to property, but the damages awarded can be reduced depending upon the contributory fault or negligence of the plaintiff. In addition, no animal may run at-large under this law. Any person who finds a dog,wild boar, or prescribed animal worrying, injuring or killing livestock on the premises of the owner or possessor of the livestock that person may destroy the dog, wild boar or prescribed animal.
Canada - B.C. - B.C. Statutes - Vancouver Charter. Part XIV -- Nuisances S.B.C. 1953, c. 55, s. 323 - 324(A)3 These British Columbia, Canada laws provide the laws for preventing, abating, and prohibiting nuisances, which include dangerous dogs. The laws describe what constitutes a dangerous dog and what actions may be taken with a dangerous dog. The set also contains provisions that allow for the creation of by-laws to control and impound animals.
Canada - Alberta - Dangerous Dogs Act R.S.A. 2000, c. D-3, s. 1 This set of laws comprises the Alberta, Canada Dangerous Dog Act. Under the Act, a justice may take a complaint that a dog has bitten or attempted to bite a person, or that a dog is dangerous and not kept under proper control. In either circumstance, if it appears to the justice that the dog ought to be destroyed, the justice shall direct a peace officer to destroy it. Additionally, a person who fails to comply with an order under this section is guilty of an offence and liable to a fine of not more than $5 for each day during which the person fails to comply with the order.
CA - Rabies - Chapter 1. Rabies Control. West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121575 - 121710 This chapter of California laws deals with rabies control.
CA - Impound - § 53074. Seizure and impoundment of dogs on private property West's Ann. Cal. Gov. Code § 53074

This California statute provides that animal control officer shall not seize or impound a dog on its owner's property for violation of a leash ordinance or issue citations for the violation of such ordinance when the dog has not strayed from the owner's private property.  However, if the dog has strayed from the property and later returned to it, an officer may issue a citation if the owner is present or impound the dog if the owner is not present.  In the latter circumstance, the officer must leave a notice of impoundment at the residence.

CA - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws West's Ann.Cal.Food & Agric.Code § 30501 - 31683; West's Ann. Cal. Fish & G. Code § 3508; 3960 - 3961; West's Ann. Cal. Gov. Code § 38792; West's Ann. Cal. Gov. Code § 25803; West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 3340 - 3342.5; West's Ann.Cal.Food & Agric.Code § 3 These statutes represent California's dog laws. Included are provisions on county control of dogs, licensing, killing and seizure of dogs, and laws regarding dangerous or vicious dogs.
CA - Dog, dangerous - § 31625. Seizure and impoundment pending hearing West's Ann.Cal.Food & Agric.Code § 31625

This California statute allows an animal control officer or law enforcement officer to seize and impound the dog pending hearing if there is probable cause to believe the dog poses an immediate threat to public safety.  The owner or keeper of the dog shall be liable to the city or county where the dog is impounded for the costs and expenses of keeping the dog, if the dog is later adjudicated potentially dangerous or vicious.

 

CA - Dog Park - § 831.7.5. Liability of public entity owning or operating a dog park; actions of a dog in the dog park West's Ann.Cal.Gov.Code § 831.7.5 This law in the Government Code states that a public entity that owns or operates a dog park shall not be held liable for injury or death of a person or pet resulting solely from the actions of a dog in the dog park.
CA - Dangerous - California Dangerous Dog Statutes West's Ann. Cal. Food & Agric. Code § 31601 - 31683; West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 3342 - 3342.5; West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121685; West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 398 - 399.5 This is the California statute for the rules and regulations regarding dangerous and/or vicious dogs. It defines what constitutes a dangerous and/or vicious dog, what is to be done with said dog(s), and provides a model provision for municipalities to follow. The other set of provisions contains the relevant dog bite law. California has strict liability for dog bites such that liability is imposed regardless of the former viciousness of the dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.
CA - Bite - Title 10. Of Crimes Against the Public Health and Safety (Dog Bite Laws) West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 398 - 399.5

If an owner of an animal knows that the animal bit another person, s/he shall provide the other person with his or her contact information and information about the animal. A violation is an infraction punishable by a fine. If any person who owns an animal and knows of its vicious propensities, allows it to run at large and the animal kills any person, the owner may be guilty of a felony. The court may order the removal of the animal or its destruction.

CA - Animal Control - Chapter 4. Animal Control West's Ann.Cal.Health & Safety Code §§ 121875 - 121945 Beyond being domestic pets, dogs provide many services to humans, such as tracking scents and guarding facilities. Below is a collection of California laws, collectively known as the Dog Act, that set out definitions, requirements, and penalties relating to guard dogs, tracking dogs, narcotics dogs, sentry dogs and the people who handle them.
AZ - Ordinances - Article 2. Board of Trustees Government After Disincorporation. A. R. S. § 9-219 (repealed 2017) This Arizona statute provides that the board of trustees of a city may p ass ordinances not inconsistent or in conflict with the laws of this state.  More specifically, this statute provides that the board may restrain , under penalties, the running at large of cattle or other animals, and provide rules for impounding them, and provide for taxing dogs and penalties for the nonpayment of such taxes, or the killing of dogs running at large in the corporate limits.  However, before exercising these powers, the board shall cause a resolution of intention to be recorded in minutes and then published in some daily or weekly newspaper at least two
AZ - Leash Laws - Article 6. Animal Control. A. R. S. § 11-1012

This Arizona laws provides generally that no female dog in her breeding season or vicious dog may be allowed to go at large.  It further delineates the state's leash requirements for dogs, including during times of rabies quarantines, in state parks, and at public schools.  Exceptions under the law include the training of livestock dogs and hunting dogs, among others.

AZ - Dog Ordinances - Powers and duties of board of supervisors (dogs/animals) A. R. S. § 11-1005 This Arizona statute provides that each county board of supervisors may regulate dogs, including the designation of a county enforcement agent, contracting with any city or town to enforce the provisions of any ordinance enacted by such city or town for the control of dogs, and for the unincorporated areas of the county, by ordinance, regulate, restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs and the excessive and unrestrained barking of dogs. They may also establish either civil or criminal penalties for violations of the above ordinances and establish a rabies quarantine zone.
AZ - Dog - Arizona Consolidated Dog Laws A. R. S. § 11-1001 - 1029; § 28-2422 - 2422.02; § 17-309

These Arizona statutes comprise the laws relating to dogs and animal bites.  Included are provisions related to registration, collaring, and vaccination of dogs.  With regard to dangerous dogs, Arizona law provides that a person with knowledge of a dog's vicious propensity must also keep the dog in an enclosed yard or confined area with a sign indicating the dog's vicious tendencies.

AR - Ordinances - § 14-54-1102. Dogs running astray. A.C.A. § 14-54-1102

This Arkansas statute provides that municipal corporations have the power to prevent the running at large of dogs and the injuries and annoyances associated with them.  Further, this statute allows municipalities to authorize the destruction or impoundment of dogs if found in violation of ordinance.  However, prior  to destroying the dog, the municipality shall give the dog's owner at least five (5) days' notice of the date of the proposed destruction of the dog by certified mail if the dog carries the owner's address.

AR - Exotic Pets - Subchapter 4. Ownership and Breeding of Wolves and Wolf-Dog Hybrids A.C.A. § 20-19-401 - 408

This chapter of Arkansas laws concerns the regulation of wolves and wolf-dog hybrids kept as companion animals. Under the law, a "wolf-dog hybrid” means any animal which is publicly acknowledged by its owner as being the offspring of a wolf and domestic dog; however, no animal may be judged to be a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid based strictly on its appearance. The specific rabies vaccination requirements for wolf-dog hybrids are detailed as well as confinement requirements (i.e, specific fence dimensions). If a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid bites a person or injures or destroys another animal while out of its confined area, the person responsible for the adequate confinement of the animal upon conviction shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.

AR - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws A.C.A. § 20-19-101 to 408; § 2-40-110; § 2-39-110; § 15-41-113; § 15-42-303; § 5-54-126

These Arkansas statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions including licensing laws, rabies control, and mandatory sterilization laws.  Also contained is the state's Wolf-Hybrid statutory section.

AL - Dog Bite/Dangerous Animal - Liability of Owners of Dogs Biting or Injuring Persons. Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-1 - 6; § 3-6-1 - 4; Ala.Code 1975 § 3-6A-1 - 8; § 3-7A-9

These Alabama statutes outline the state's dog bite law.  The law first provides that, when any person owns or keeps a vicious or dangerous animal of any kind and, as a result of his or her careless management or allowing the dog to go at liberty, and another person, without fault is injured, such owner shall be liable in damages for such injury.  If any dog shall, without provocation, bite or injure any person who is at the time at a place where he or she has a legal right to be, the owner of such dog shall be liable in damages to the person so bitten or injured.  This apparent strict liability has a mitigation provision that states that the owner of such dog shall be entitled to plead and prove in mitigation of damages that he had no knowledge of any circumstances indicating such dog to be or to have been vicious or dangerous.  If an owner, however, is aware that his or her dog is rabid at the time of the bite, he or she shall be liable for twice the damages sustained.

AL - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-1 - 29; § 3-6-1 - 4; § 3-6A-1 - 8; § 3-7A-1 - 16; § 3-8-1; § 9-11-305 - 307; § 9-11-238; § 45-37A-53.01 These statutes comprise Alabama's relevant dog laws. Included among the provisions are licensing requirements, dangerous dog provisions, and the chapter on rabies.
AK - Ordinances - § 03.55.070. Power of village council to control dogs AS § 03.55.070

This Alaska statute enables a village council the power to destroy loose dogs in the village and otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities.  The council may impose and enforce the provisions of a dog control ordinance in the total area within 20 miles of the village.

AK - Dogs - Title 3. Agriculture and Animals. Chapter 55. Dogs. AS § 03.55.010 - 070, § 11.56.705 - 715; § 44.09.140 This collection reflects Alaska's dog laws. The primary dog laws give permission to kill dangerous dogs that are running at large or those that are chasing livestock. It also defines a dangerous dog - "Any dog which when unprovoked has ever bitten or attacked a human being is considered vicious . . ." Notably, "[a]ny person may lawfully kill any vicious or mad dog running at large." This section also allows a village council of an unincorporated village to destroy loose dogs in the village or otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities. Other laws concern the state dog and harming police dogs.
AK - Bite - § 03.55.030. Dogs that annoy or bite animals or birds AS § 03.55.030

This Alaska statute provides that any dog that habitually annoys any wild deer, reindeer, sheep, cattle, horse, or other animal or bird either domestic or wild, or evinces a disposition which makes it likely that it will without provocation bite an animal or fowl, may be lawfully killed by any person when it is found at large. The owner or keeper of the dog, if known or reasonably identifiable, shall be notified and given reasonable opportunity to restrain the dog before it is lawful to kill it.

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