Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
NV - Research - 598.993. Prohibition on import, sale or offer for sale of cosmetic products tested on animals; exceptions; N.R.S. 598.993 This Nevada law, enacted in 2020, states that a manufacturer shall not import for profit, sell or offer for sale in this State any cosmetic for which the manufacturer knew or reasonably should have known that animal testing was conducted or contracted by or on behalf of the manufacturer or any supplier of the manufacturer if the animal testing was conducted on or after January 1, 2020. Limited exceptions exist. A violation of this section constitutes a deceptive trade practice for the purposes of NRS 598.0903 to 598.0999, inclusive.
NV - Breed - 687B.383. Refusal to issue, cancellation of, nonrenewal certain policies solely on basis of breed N.R.S. 687B.383 This Nevada law effective in 2022 provides that an insurer shall not refuse to issue, cancel, refuse to renew, or increase the premium for an insurance policy based solely on the specific breed or mixture of breed of a dog. This does not prohibit those actions if the policy change is directly related to a dog that has been previously declared dangerous or vicious.
NY - Endangered Species - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. N.Y. Envtl. Conserv. Law § 11-0535 The New York code for endangered species defines endangered species as any species which meets one of the following criteria: native species in imminent danger of extirpation or extinction in New York; or species listed as endangered by the United States Department of the Interior in the Code of Federal Regulations (50 CFR part 17).
NY - Eagles - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. N.Y. Envtl. Conserv. Law § 11-0537 New York makes it illegal to "knowingly or with wanton disregard for the consequences" take, transport, possess, or engage in commerce of bald eagles or their parts without a valid permit. This incorporates the exact language of the federal act.
New York Consolidated Laws 1909: Sections 180-196 N.Y. Penal Law §§ 180-196 (Consol. 1909) Article 16, entitled "Animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1909. The act covers such topics as the keeping of animals for fighting to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180 for important words such as animal and torture.
New York Consolidated Laws 1938: Sections 180-196 N.Y. Penal Law §§ 180-196 (Consol. 1938) Article 16, entitled "Animals", concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1938. The act covers such topics as poisoning of animals to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180.
New York Penal Law 1866: Chapter 682: Section 2 N.Y. Rev. Stat. 682.2 (1866) Chapter 682 from New York Penal Law of 1866 covers cruelty to animals. Section 2 from this chapter describes the offense entitled neglect of disabled animals. The law states the penalty for leaving a disabled or diseased animal to die on any state or city land.
New York Revised Statutes 1874: Chapter 12: Sections 1-8 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 12, §§ 1-8 (1874) Chapter 12, entitled "An act relating to animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1874.
New York Revised Statutes 1867: Chapter 375: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 375, §§ 1-10 (1867) Chapter 375, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's law on animal treatment for 1867.
New York Revised Statute 1881: Chapter 682: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 682, § 26 (1881) Section 26 of Chapter 682 from New York Revised Statutes 1881 concerns the treatment of animals by the owner or any other person. A person found harming such an animal would be guilty of a misdemeanor.
New York Revised Statutes 1866: Chapter 783: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 783, §§ 1-10 (1866) Chapter 783, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's Law on animal treatment for 1866.
New York Revised Statutes 1829: Title 6: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. stat. tit. 6, 26 (1829) The law contained in Title 6, Section 26 of the New York Revised Statutes of 1829 concerns the offense of maliciously killing an animal of another. The statute describes the type of animals covered and the punishment for killing, wounding, or maiming such an animal. In addition, the statute also states the punishment for the offense of cruelty to animals.
AU - Parks - National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (SA) National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972

An Act to provide for the establishment and management of reserves for public benefit and enjoyment; to provide for the conservation of wildlife in a natural environment; and for other purposes.

AU - Wildlife - National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 (NSW) National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 An Act to consolidate and amend the law relating to the establishment, preservation and management of national parks, historic sites and certain other areas and the protection of certain fauna, native plants and Aboriginal objects .
AU - Nature Conservation Act 1980 ( ACT) Nature Conservation Act 1980 An Act to make provision for the protection and conservation of native animals and native plants, and for the preservation of areas for those purposes. The Act creates the office of Conservator of Flora and Fauna and the Australian Capital Territory Parks and Conservation Service.
AU - Wildlife - Nature Conservation Act 2002 (TAS) Nature Conservation Act 2002 No. 63 of 2002 31.12.2002

An Act to make provision with respect to the conservation and protection of the fauna, flora and geological diversity of the State,   to provide for the declaration of national parks and other reserved   land and for related purposes.

ND - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws NDCC 11-11-14; 20.1-04-12 - 12.2; 20.1-05-02.1; 23-36-01 - 09; 36-21-10 - 11; 40-05-01 -2; 40-05-19; 42-03-01 - 04; 43-29-16.1; 12.1-17-09 These statutes comprise North Dakota's dog laws. Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, rabies, control laws, provisions that define dogs as a public nuisance, and laws concerning dogs that harass big game or livestock.
ND - Ecoterrorism - Chapter 12.1-21.1. Animal Research Facility Damage NDCC 12.1-21.1-01 to 05 This chapter concerns unlawful interference with animal facilities. Under the section, a person may not intentionally damage or destroy an animal facility or the property or animals located therein; exercise control over the animals or property; enter an animal facility not open to the public with the intent on committing prohibited acts; enter a facility and remain concealed to commit prohibited acts; or intentionally release an animal at a facility. Violation is a class B felony if damage is $10,000 or more, a class C felony if the damage is at least $500 to under $10,000, and a class A misdemeanor if damage is less than $500. Entering an animal facility and using or attempting to use a camera, video recorder, or any other video or audio recording equipment is a class B misdemeanor.
ND - Endangered Species - Chapter 20.1-09. Propagation of Protected Birds and Animals NDCC 20.1-01-02, NDCC 20.1-09-01 - 05 These North Dakota statutes provide a state definition for endangered species as well as laws relating to possession and propagation of protected animals.
ND - Hunting - NDCC, 20.1-01-11 Hunting and harassing game from aircraft, motor vehicle, or snowmobile prohibited NDCC 20.1-01-11 This North Dakota statute states that no person operating or controlling the operation of any aircraft or motor vehicle in the state may intentionally kill, chase, or harass any wild animal or wild bird, protected or unprotected, unless exceptions under the statute apply. Also no person, while operating a snowmobile in the state, may intentionally kill, chase, flush, or harass any wild animal or wild bird, protected or unprotected.
ND - Hunting - Chapter 20.1-01. General Provisions. NDCC 20.1-01-31 This law reflects North Dakota's hunter harassment provision. Under the law, no person may intentionally interfere with the lawful taking of wildlife on public or private land by another or intentionally harass, drive, or disturb any wildlife on public or private land for the purpose of disrupting a lawful hunt. Also, no person may remove with or tamper with a legally set trap. This section does not apply to any incidental interference arising from lawful activity by public or private land users or to landowners or operators interfering with hunters on land owned or operated by that individual.
ND - Hunting, Internet - § 20.1-01-35. Hunting through the internet prohibited--Penalty NDCC 20.1-01-35 This law prohibits hunting through the Internet or otherwise enabling such activity as described in the law. A person who violates this section is guilty of a class C felony.
ND - Eagle - Chapter 20.1-04. Birds, Regulations. NDCC 20.1-04-05 (repealed 2017) (Repealed 2017) North Dakota has a statute that specifically prohibits any taking or possession of bald and golden eagles or their parts. Included in the prohibited acts are take, kill, hunt, possess, pursue, or even disturb. Buying and selling are not specifically listed, but are presumed to be included in possess.
ND - Rabies - Chapter 23-36. Rabies Control. NDCC 23-36-03 This North Dakota statute provides that the appropriate health department, or an agency acting on the department's behalf, may seize and euthanize, impound at the owner's expense, or quarantine any animal if the state health officer, or the state health officer's designee, has probable cause to believe the animal presents clinical signs of rabies.
ND - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws NDCC 25-13-01 to 06 ; 47-16-07.5 - 7.6 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
ND - Livestock - State Board of Animal Health NDCC 36-01-00.1 - 36 This Chapter of North Dakota laws deals with the state board of animal health, state veterinarian, and special provisions for keeping certain non-traditional livestock. Section 36-01-08.2 states that any person who keeps a mountain lion, wolf, or wolf hybrid in captivity must obtain an identification number from the state board. Section 36-01-08.4 also provides that a person may not keep a skunk or raccoon in captivity, and that the state board must adopt rules concerning the keeping of a primate, wolf, or wolf-hybrid in captivity. The remainder of the chapter deals primary with infectious disease control in livestock, although section 36-01-31 contains a ban on the keeping of a live venomous reptile.
ND - Damages - § 36-21-13. Exemplary damages for injuries to domestic animals NDCC 36-21-13 This North Dakota statutes provides that exemplary damages may be applied for any wrongful injury to an animal committed willfully or by gross negligence
ND - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws (Chapter 36-21.1) NDCC 36-21.1-01 to 15; § 36–21.2–01 to 15; § 12.1-20-02, 12.1-20-12 This North Dakota section comprises the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.
ND - Vehicle - § 39-08-19. Penalty for harassment of domestic animals NDCC 39-08-19 This North Dakota statute states that any person operating a motorcycle, snowmobile, or other motor vehicle who willfully harasses or frightens any domestic animal, is, upon conviction, guilty of a class B misdemeanor and is also liable for the value of the animal and exemplary damages.
ND - Veterinary - Chapter 43-29. Veterinarians NDCC 43-29-01 to 19; 43-29.1-01 - 08 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
ND - Equine Activity - Chapter 53-10. Equine Activity Sponsor or Professional. NDCC 53-10-01; NDCC 53-10-02 This North Dakota statute provides that an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional is not liable for an injury to or the death of a participant engaged in an equine activity and no participant may maintain an action against an equine activity sponsor or professional. Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "equine activity," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional." Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.
ND - Trust - Chapter 59-12. Creation, Validity, Modification, and Termination of Trust NDCC 59-12-08 North Dakota's pet trust law was enacted in 2007. A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
ND - Lost Property - CHAPTER 60-01. DEPOSITS - GENERAL PROVISIONS. NDCC 60-01-34 to 43 These statutes comprise North Dakota's lost property provisions.
NE - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws Neb. Rev. St § 14-102; § 15-218 - 220; § 16-206; 16-235; § 17-526, 17-547; § 25-21,236; § 37-525; § 37-705; § 54-601 - 616; § 54-617 - 624; § 54-625 - 650; § 71-4401 - 4412 These Nebraska statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include the municipal authority to regulate dogs at large and licensing, rabies control, and dangerous dog laws. The set of laws relating to commercial pet dealers and breeders is also provided.
NE - Exotic pets - Chapter 37. Game and Parks. Article 4. Permits and Licenses. (B) Special Permits and Licenses. Neb. Rev. St. § 37-477 to 37-482 This set of Nebraska laws provides that no person shall keep in captivity any wild bird or mammal that is either in need of conservation or listed as an endangered or threatened species. Further, no person shall keep in captivity in this state any wolf, any skunk, or any member of the families Felidae (except the domestic cat) and Ursidae (the bear family). Any person legally holding in captivity, on March 1, 1986, any such animal subject to the prohibition shall be allowed to keep the animal for the duration of its life. The section also outlines the legal requirements for obtaining and maintaining captive wildlife.
NE - Equine Activity Liability - Article 21. Actions and Proceedings in Particular Cases. (EE) Equine Activities Neb. Rev. St. § 25-21,249 - 253 This Nebraska statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities and no participant shall make any claim against, maintain an action against, or recover from an equine activity sponsor. Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "inherent risk," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional." Engages in an equine activity does not include being a spectator at an equine activity except in cases when the spectator places himself or herself in an unauthorized area. The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.
NE - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws (Article 10) Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1001 - 1020 This Nebraska statutory section comprises the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions. The cruelty provision provides that a person who abandons or cruelly neglects an animal is guilty of a Class I misdemeanor. Intentional animal cruelty results in a Class I misdemeanor for the first offense and a Class IV felony for any subsequent offense, unless such cruel mistreatment involves the knowing and intentional torture, repeated beating, or mutilation of the animal where such an act automatically results in a Class IV felony. Animal means any vertebrate member of the animal kingdom, but does not include an uncaptured wild creature (which appears to exclude otherwise heinous, intentional acts to wildlife).
NE - Trusts - Chapter 30. Decedents' Estates; Protection of Persons and Property. Neb. Rev. St. § 30-3834 This statute represents Nebraska's pet trust law. The law adopts the language of Section 408 of the Uniform Trust Act and states that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
NE - Wildlife - Article 2. Game Law General Provisions Neb. Rev. St. § 37-201 to 248 These statutes comprise the definitional section of Nebraska's wildlife code. Among the definitions include game, aquaculture, wildlife, hunt, and take.
NE - Predators - Article 5. Regulations and Prohibited Acts. (e) Damage by Wildlife Neb. Rev. St. § 37-559 to 563 This statute provides that a farmer or rancher may kill a predator that threatens agricultural or livestock interests without first having obtained a permit. The provision does not allow a farmer or rancher to destroy those species protected under the federal Endangered Species Act, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and other listed federal wildlife acts.
NE - Hunting - Chapter 37. Game and Parks. Neb. Rev. St. § 37-564 to 37-570 This set of laws represents Nebraska's hunter harassment provisions. The section provides that no person shall knowingly and intentionally interfere or attempt to interfere with another person who is not trespassing and who is lawfully hunting, trapping, or fishing or engaged in activity associated with hunting, trapping, or fishing. A court may enjoin conduct described under the section. The section states that it is an affirmative defense where the alleged violator was not trespassing at the time of the interference and was engaged in lawful activity in conflict with the hunting, trapping, or fishing activity. Any person violating section 37-564 shall be guilty of a Class III misdemeanor.
NE - Hunting, Internet - § 37-571, 37-572, 37-573. Hunt through the Internet Neb. Rev. St. § 37-571, 37-572, 37-573 These statute prohibits internet hunting and the hosting of internet hunting within the state of Nebraska. Any person who violates subsection (1) or subsection (2) of section 37-572 is guilty of a Class II misdemeanor.
NE - Endangered Species - Article 8. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act Neb. Rev. St. § 37-801 to 811 These statutes comprise the Nebraska Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act. Included are the definitions used in the Act, the legislative intent behind the Act, and the duty of the commission that oversees the Act. Violation of the Act constitutes a Class II misdemeanor.
NE - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Neb. Rev. St. § 49-801; Neb. Rev. St. § 20-126 - 131.04; Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1313 - 1314; Neb. Rev. St. § 54-603; Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1009.01 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant service animal, assistance animal, and guide dog laws.
NE - Lien, veterinary - Article 7. Veterinarian's Lien. Neb. Rev. St. § 52-701 - 702 These Nebraska laws provide the state's veterinary lien provisions, which concern only liens on livestock animals. Under Section 52-701, a licensed veterinarian who is contracted or hired to treat or in any way take care of any kind of livestock has a lien on that livestock for the reasonable value of services and medicines provided. This lien is treated as an agricultural lien under the UCC and may be enforced in the manner of other secured transactions in article 9 of the UCC. The lien must be perfected as provided under article 9 with the information outlined in this law.
NE - Horse Slaughter - Article 19. Meat and Poultry Inspection. (a) Nebraska Meat and Poultry Inspection Law Neb. Rev. St. § 54-1901 - 1915.02 The Nebraska Meat and Poultry Inspection Law assures that only wholesome meat and poultry products enter regular commercial channels of commerce and to provide that same are identified and truthfully labeled. It is unlawful under the act for any person to operate or maintain any establishment unless first licensed by the department. With regard to horses, it is unlawful for any person to sell, transport, offer for sale or transportation, or receive for transportation, in intrastate commerce any carcasses of horses, mules, or other equines or parts of such carcasses, or the meat or meat food products thereof, unless they are plainly and conspicuously marked or labeled or otherwise identified as required by regulations prescribed by the director to show the kinds of animals from which they were derived.
NE - Livestock - Article 23. Domesticated Cervine Animal Act Neb. Rev. St. § 54-2301 to 54- 2324 This set of laws comprises Nebraska's Domesticated Cervine Animal Act. Under the act, it is unlawful for any person to own, possess, buy, sell, or barter any domesticated cervine animal in this state unless such animal is individually identified and kept at a premises for which a domesticated cervine animal facility permit has been issued by the department. A municipal, state, or federal zoo, park, refuge, or wildlife area, a bona fide circus or animal exhibit, or any private, nonprofit zoological society is not required to obtain a permit in order to own, possess, buy, sell, or barter a domesticated cervine animal, but such facilities are still governed by the provisions of the act regarding the testing, control, and eradication of cervidae diseases including chronic wasting disease.
NE - Dangerous - ARTICLE 6. DOGS AND CATS. (B) DANGEROUS DOGS. Neb. Rev. St. § 54-617 to 54-624 These Nebraska statutes outline the state's dangerous dog laws. Among the provisions include a requirement that the dog must be restrained when not in a secure enclosure on the owner's property. There is also a requirement that owners must post warning signs on the property notifying people that a dangerous dog is present. If a dangerous dog bites a person, the owner can be found guilty of a Class IV misdemeanor and the dog will be destroyed.
NE - Cruelty - Article 9. Livestock Animal Welfare Act Neb. Rev. St. § 54-901 - 913 In 2010, Nebraska enacted the Livestock Animal Welfare Act. The act makes the intentional abandonment, neglect, or cruel mistreatment of livestock (bovine, equine, swine, sheep, goats, domesticated cervine animals, ratite birds, or poultry) a Class I misdemeanor (Class IV felony for subsequent offenses). Further, the act criminalizes "indecency with a livestock animal," which is a Class III misdemeanor. A person who is convicted of a Class IV felony under 54-903 (the abandonment/cruel neglect or mistreatment provision) shall also be ordered by the sentencing court not to possess a livestock animal for at least 5 years after the date of conviction.
Nebraska Complied Laws 1887: Chapter X: Offenses Related to Domestic Animals Neb. Stat. ch. 10 §§ 63-82 Nebraska Compiled Statutes from 1887. The statutes cover cruelty to animals from transportation to negligence in handling.  Also covered is the stealing or interfering with various types of domestic animals.

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