Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort ascending Summary
OR - Animal Definitions - Chapter 87. Statutory Liens. Liens Generally. 87.142. Definitions O. R. S. § 87.142 This is Oregon's statutory definitions for Animal Statutes.
OR - Veterinary - Chapter 686. Veterinarians; Veterinary Technicians. O. R. S. § 686.010 - 990 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
OR - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws O. R. S. § 659A.141; 659A.143; 167.352; 609.100; 401.977; 811.035; 814.110 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
OR - Predator Control - Chapter 610. Predatory Animals. O. R. S. § 610.002 - 990 These Oregon statutes pertain to the control of predatory animals, which are defined as feral swine, coyotes, rabbits, rodents, and certain birds, and establish the Predatory Animal, Rabbit and Rodent Control Fund. The State Department of Agriculture may employ hunters and trappers to control and eradicate harmful predatory animals.
OR - Pet Dealers - 609.520. Inspection of records; procedure for obtaining animal held by dealer; O. R. S. § 609.520 This Oregon statute sets out the right of a person to inspect a pet dealer's business for the purpose of finding a lost companion animal. The statute also outlines acceptable methods to prove ownership and the procedure for resolving a dispute of ownership.
OR - Exotic Pets - Chapter 609. Animal Control; Exotic Animals; Dealers. O. R. S. § 609.205 - 355 These Oregon laws concern the regulation of exotic pets in the state. An "exotic animal" for purposes of the section means a member of the family Felidae not indigenous to Oregon (except the domestic cat), any nonhuman primate, any nonwolf member of the family Canidae not indigenous to Oregon (except the domestic dog), any bear except the black bear, and any member of the order Crocodylia. A person may not keep an exotic animal in this state unless the person possesses a valid State Department of Agriculture permit for that animal issued prior to the effective date of this 2009 Act.
OR - Impound - 609.090. Impounding dogs running at large; disposition of chasing, menacing or biting O. R. S. § 609.090 This Oregon statute provides that when a dog is running at large contrary to state or municipal law, a police or dog control officer shall impound it. Unless claimed by its owner, a dog will be held at least five days if it has a license tag. A "reasonable effort" shall be made to notify the keeper of a dog before the dog is removed from impoundment. This statute also states that, upon finding that the dog has menaced or chased a person when on premises other than the premises occupied exclusively by the keeper or has bitten a person, the dog control board or county governing body may order that the dog be killed in a humane manner. Before ordering that the dog be killed, the board or governing body shall consider the factors described in ORS 609.093 and issue written findings on those factors. A keeper of the dog may also file a petition to prevent the destruction. If the dog is not killed, the board or governing body may impose reasonable restrictions on the keeping of the dog.
OR - Licenses - 609.060. Notice by publication of election result; dogs running at large prohibited; violations O. R. S. § 609.060 This Oregon statute provides that if a governing body of a county by ordinance, or a measure approved by the electors in an election prohibits dogs from running at large, the county shall give notice, by publication in a newspaper having a general circulation in the county. If after 60 days from the notice, a keeper violates the running at large ordinance, he or she commits a Class B violation.
OR - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 603. Meat Dealers and Slaughterers. Meat Dealers and Slaughterers, in General. O. R. S. § 603.010 - 992 These Oregon laws comprise the state's slaughter laws. Among the provisions is the humane slaughter law, which requires that cattle, equines, sheep, or swine are slaughtered by by any method which renders the animal insensible to pain by a single blow or gunshot or by an electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective; or by a method in accordance with the ritual requirements of any religious faith that prescribes a method of slaughter whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain. Violation of ORS 603.065 (the humane slaughter law) is a Class B misdemeanor.
OR - Sharks - 498.257. Possession, sale, etc. of shark fins prohibited; exceptions O. R. S. § 498.257, O. R. S. § 509.160 Under these Oregon statutes, a person may not possess, sell or offer for sale, trade or distribute a shark fin. However, there are exceptions for shark fins from spiny dogfish, for people who have a shark license, and for fish processors who have a license.
OR - Hunting - 496.994. Unlawful to obstruct the taking of wildlife O. R. S. § 496.994; 496.996 These two sections reflect Oregon's hunter harassment provisions. Under 496.994, a person commits the offense of obstructing the taking of wildlife if the person, having no right to do so, interferes with the lawful taking, or the process of taking, of wildlife by another with the intent to prevent the taking. Violation is a Class A misdemeanor. In a companion law, a person commits the crime of unlawful taking of wildlife if he or she discharges a hunting device toward a wildlife decoy in a manner inconsistent with lawful taking and the decoy is under the control of law enforcement officials.
OR - Endangered Species - Chapter 496. Application, Administration and Enforcement of Wildlife Laws. O. R. S. § 496.171 - 996; 498.026 These Oregon statutes set out the definitions and rules relating to the Oregon endangered species laws. Specifically, Oregon law provides rules for listing based on the federal ESA list as well as the state criteria. Violation of the law constitutes a Class A misdemeanor with an enhanced felony provision for subsequent convictions involving certain species (i.e., taking of game fish with a total value of $200 or more or the taking of antelope, black bear, cougar, deer, elk, moose, mountain goat or mountain sheep in violation of the wildlife laws) within a ten-year period.
OR - Damages - 30.822. Theft of or injury to search and rescue animal or therapy animal; attorney fees O. R. S. § 30.822 This Oregon law provides that the owner of a search and rescue animal or a therapy animal may bring an action for economic and noneconomic damages against any person who steals or, without provocation, attacks the search and rescue animal or therapy animal. The owner may also bring an action for such damages against the owner of any animal that, without provocation, attacks a search and rescue animal or therapy animal. If the animal dies as a result of the injuries sustained or the incident prevents the animal from returning to service, the measure of economic damages shall include, but need not be limited to, the replacement value of an equally trained animal, without any differentiation for the age or the experience of the animal. If the animal recovers and returns to service, the measure of economic damages shall include, but need not be limited to, the costs of temporary replacement services, veterinary medical expenses and any other costs and expenses incurred by the owner as a result of the theft of or injury to the animal.
OR - Vehicle, unattended animal - 30.813. Entrance into motor vehicle to remove unattended child or domestic animal; O. R. S. § 30.813 This Oregon law enacted in 2017 gives immunity from civil or criminal liability to a person who enters a motor vehicle, by force or otherwise, to remove a child or domestic animal if he or she follows steps listed in the law. The person must first determine the vehicle is locked and there is no reasonable method for the animal or child to exit the vehicle. That person must also have a good faith and reasonable belief based on the circumstances that entry is necessary due to imminent harm. Additionally, that person must notify law enforcement/emergency services before or soon as is reasonably practicable, use no more force than necessary to enter the vehicle, and remain with the child or animal until responders arrive.
OR - Equine Liability Act - Chapter 30. Actions and Suits in Particular Cases. Actions Arising Out of Equine Activities. O. R. S. § 30.687 - 697 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or an equine professional is immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, arising out of riding, training, driving, grooming or riding as a passenger upon an equine. However, there are exceptions to this rule: an equine sponsor or professional will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant.
OR - Fur - 167.390. Commerce in fur of domestic cats and dogs O. R. S. § 167.390 In Oregon, a person may not take, buy, sell, barter or otherwise exchange for commerce in fur purposes the raw fur or products that include the fur of a domestic cat or dog if the fur is obtained through a process that kills or maims the cat or dog. Violation is a Class A misdemeanor when the offense is committed with a culpable mental state as defined in ORS 161.085.
OR - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes O. R. S. § 167.305 - 439 These Oregon statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty laws. "Animal" means any nonhuman mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian or fish. The term "assault," which is generally associated with human crimes, is used to define certain crimes against animals. Animal abuse may be elevated to a felony offense if the act was committed directly in front of a minor child or if the perpetrator was previously convicted of domestic violence.
OR - Cruelty - Arrest warrants in cruelty matters (Chapter 133) O. R. S. § 133.375 - 381 This set of Oregon laws relates to the arrest of those found violating the state's cruelty laws. Under the section, any person violating ORS 167.315 to 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428 may be arrested and held without warrant, in the same manner as in the case of persons found breaking the peace. Further, any peace officer who cares or provides for an animal pursuant to this section and any person into whose care an animal is delivered by a peace officer acting under this section shall be immune from civil or criminal liability based upon an allegation that such care was negligently provided.
OR - Trusts - 130.185. Pet trust. O. R. S. § 130.185 This statute comprises Oregon's Pet Trust law based on the Uniform Trust Code. Under the law, a trust may be created to provide for the care of one or more animals that are alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
NY - Police Dog - § 122-c. Transport of police work dogs injured in the line of duty NY GEN MUN § 122-c This New York statutes allows for paramedics or emergency medical service technicians to transport any police work dog that is injured in the line of duty to a veterinary clinic if there are no persons requiring medical attention or transport at such time.
NV - Wildlife - Chapter 501. Administration and Enforcement. NRS § 501.097 "Wildlife" means any wild mammal, wild bird, fish, reptile, amphibian, mollusk or crustacean found naturally in a wild state, whether indigenous to Nevada or not and whether raised in captivity or not.
Noway - Cruelty - Norwegian Animal Welfare Act (2010) Norwegian Animal Welfare Act

This comprehensive Animal Welfare Act from Norway covers nearly all aspects in the treatment of animals, including research, farming, and general care.  The intention of this Act is to promote good animal welfare and respect for animals.

CR - Veterinary - General Law on the National Service of Animal Health (Law 8495) No. 8495

The law that organizes the Veterinary Official Service of Costa Rica (SENASA), the government institution that is responsible for animal welfare and many other aspects related to animal production and the protection of human and animal health.

South Africa - Cruelty - Animal Protection NO. 71 OF 1962; ACT NO 24 OF 1935; NO. R. 468 1986; Acts relating to the prevention of cruelty to animals. Contains: Animal Protection Act - page 1 Performing Animal Protection Act (including guard dogs) – page 12 Regulations for Performing Animal Protection Act Regulations of Seizure of Animals by SPCA’s – page 14 Animal Matters Amendment Act, 1993 - page 16
South Africa - Protected Areas Act - National Environmental Management No. 57 of 2003: National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act, 2003. This act is to provide for the protection and conservation of ecologically viable areas representative of South Africa’s biological diversity and its natural landscapes and seascapes; for the establishment of a national register of all national, provincial and local protected areas; for the management of those areas in accordance with national norms and standards; for intergovernmental co-operation and public consultation in matters concerning protected areas; and for matters in connection therewith.
South Africa - Biodiversity - National Environmental Management No. 10 of 2004: National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004. The objectives of this Act are, within the framework of the National Environmental Management Act, to provide for the management and conservation of biological diversity within the Republic and of the components of such biological diversity; to provide for the use of indigenous biological resources in a sustainable manner; and to provide for the fair and equitable sharing among stakeholders of benefits arising from bioprosgecting involving indigenous biological resources. Other objecitves of this Act are to give effect to ratified international agreements relating to biodiversity which are binding on the Republic; to provide for co-operative governance in biodiversity management and conservation; and to provide for a South African National Biodiversity Institute to assist in achieving the objectives of this Act.
Malawi National Parks and Wildlife Act No 11 of 1992

This law represented a major redraft of the old British game law. It protects endangered species and parks. It also sets out the general game law. Notably it also requires the use of environmental impact statements.

NM - Pet Trusts - Chapter 46A. Uniform Trust Code. NMSA 1978, §46A-4-408 Section 46A-4-408, was adopted in 2003, and did not repeal the previous pet trust law. However, in 2016, the original pet trust law (46A-4-407) was finally repealed. The new section follows the language of the Uniform Trust Code and simply states that a trust for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime is valid. The trust terminates upon the death of the last animal named and any excess trust property is distributed to the settlor, if living, or his or her successors in interest.
NM - Pigs, feral - § 77-18-6. Feral hogs; prohibition; penalty NMSA 1978, § 77-18-6 This New Mexico law prohibits the importation, transportation, holding for breeding, releasing, or selling of a sell a live feral hog or the operation of a commercial feral hog hunting enterprise. Any person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000) or by imprisonment for a definite term of less than one year or both.
NM - Wild Horses - § 77-18-5. Wild horses; conformation, history and deoxyribonucleic acid testing NMSA 1978, § 77-18-5 This New Mexico law states that a wild horse that is captured on public land shall have its conformation, history and deoxyribonucleic acid tested to determine if it is a Spanish colonial horse. If it is a Spanish colonial horse, the wild horse shall be relocated to a state or private wild horse preserve created and maintained for the purpose of protecting Spanish colonial horses. If it is not a Spanish colonial horse, it shall be returned to the public land, relocated to a public or private wild horse preserve or put up for adoption by the agency on whose land the wild horse was captured.
NM - Exotic Pets - § 77-18-1. Sale, purchase, trade and possession of certain animals regulated NMSA 1978, § 77-18-1 This New Mexico law states that the sale, purchase, trade and possession with intent to keep as a pet of any subhuman primate, skunk, raccoon, fox or other sylvatic carnivore may be regulated by regulation of the health and environment department [department of health] for the protection of public health and safety.
NM - Wildlife - Article 15. Predatory Wild Animals and Rodent Pests NMSA 1978, § 77-15-1 to 77-15-14 The New Mexico County Predatory Control Act deals with predatory wild animals and rodent pests. On federal lands, the federal government pays for rodent pest repression. On public federal or state lands, the state and federal cooperative funds pay for rodent pest repression. On private land, rodent pest repression is based on voluntary cooperation of owners, but if the owner fails, after written notice, to destroy the prairie dogs, the state rodent inspector is authorized to enter the lands and destroy the prairie dogs at the expense of the owner. Any person who interferes with the rodent inspector is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of $100 to $500.
NM - Impound - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-17 This New Mexico statute provides that the owner or operator of a veterinary clinic or hospital, a doctor of veterinary medicine, a kennel, grooming parlor or other animal care facility is not liable for disposing of abandoned animals after proper notice has been sent to the owner of record.
NM - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-10 This New Mexico statute provides that it is unlawful for any person to keep any animal known to be vicious and liable to attack or injure human beings unless such animal is securely kept to prevent injury to any person. It is also unlawful to keep any unvaccinated dog or cat or any animal with any symptom of rabies or to fail or to refuse to destroy vicious animals or unvaccinated dogs or cats with symptoms of rabies.
NM - Property - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-1 Dogs, cats and domestic birds are considered personal property in New Mexico.
NM - Veterinary - Article 14. Veterinary Practice Act. NMSA 1978, § 61-14-1 to 61-14-20 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
NM - Equine Activity Liability - Article 13. Equine Liability NMSA 1978, § 42-13-1 to 42-13-5 This act stipulates that any person, corporation or partnership is immune from liability for the death or injury of a rider, which resulted while the rider was engaged in an equine activity. However, there are exceptions to this rule: a person, corporation, or partnership will be held liable for injuries if he or she displays a conscious, reckless, or intentional disregard for the safety of the rider, and if the person, corporation, or partnership fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the rider.
NM - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes NMSA 1978, § 30-18-1 to 30-18-16 This section comprises the New Mexico anti-animal cruelty provisions. As used in this section, "animal" does not include insects or reptiles. Cruelty to animals occurs when a person mistreats, injures, kills without lawful justification or torments an animal or abandons or fails to provide necessary sustenance to an animal under that person's custody or control. Extreme cruelty to animals, a fourth-degree felony, consists of a person intentionally or maliciously torturing, mutilating, injuring or poisoning an animal or maliciously killing an animal. Upon conviction, the court may order a person to participate in an animal cruelty prevention program or an animal cruelty education program, or to obtain psychological counseling for treatment of a mental health disorder.
NM - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws NMSA 1978, § 3-18-3; § 77-1-1 - 20; § 77-1A-1 - 6; § 77-1B-1 - 12; § 25-1-15 These statutes comprise New Mexico's dog laws. Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, vaccination requirements, and provisions related to dangerous dogs.
NM - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws NMSA 1978, § 28-7-3 to 28-7-5; § 28-11-1 to 28-11-6; § 77-1-15.1; § 65-7-16 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NM - Fur/Trapping - Article 5. Trappers and Fur Dealers NMSA 1978, § 17-5-1 to 17-5-9 These New Mexico statutes regulate trappers and fur dealers. Fur-bearing animals, such as muskrat, mink, weasel, beaver, otter, nutria, masked or blackfooted ferret, ringtail cat, raccoon, pine marten, coatimundi, badgers, bobcat and foxes, may only be taken during certain seasons or with a permit and/or a license. Fur dealers must have a license to buy or sell skins. A violation of the statutes is a misdemeanor.
NM - Invasive Species - Chapter 17. Game and Fish and Outdoor Recreation. NMSA 1978, § 17-4-35 These New Mexico statutes pertain to controlling aquatic invasive species. If a conveyance or equipment has been in an infested water body, the owner must decontaminate it or have it inspected and certified prior to entering another water body in the state. Law enforcement officers must take action to prevent infested equipment from entering water bodies, and may impound equipment if the person transporting it refuses to submit to an inspection and the officer has reason to believe that an aquatic invasive species may be present.
NM - Hunting - § 17-3-49. Computer-assisted remote hunting prohibited; penalties NMSA 1978, § 17-3-49 This law makes it illegal to engage in computer-assisted remote hunting, provide facilities for that purpose, create or advertise such software or websites, or keep an animal confined for computer-assisted remote hunting. Violation also leads to a revocation of licenses issued by the state game commission.
NM - Hunting - Chapter 17. Game and Fish and Outdoor Recreation. NMSA 1978, § 17-2-7.1 This law represents New Mexico's hunter harassment provision. It is unlawful for a person to commit interference with another person who is lawfully hunting, trapping or fishing in an area where hunting, trapping or fishing is permitted by a custodian of public property or an owner or lessee of private property. A first offense is a petty misdemeanor; a second or subsequent offense is a misdemeanor. This section does not apply to a farmer or rancher in pursuit of his or her normal farm or ranch operation or law enforcement officer in pursuit of his or her official duties.
NM - Police Animals - § 13-6-1. Disposition of obsolete, worn-out or unusable tangible personal property NMSA 1978, § 13-6-1 This New Mexico statute concerns tangible personal property of governing local and state agencies. Paragraph L deals with retired K-9 dogs. The section states, "[i]f the secretary of public safety finds that the K-9 dog presents no threat to public safety, the K-9 dog shall be released from public ownership as provided in this subsection. The K-9 dog shall first be offered to its trainer or handler free of charge. If the trainer or handler does not want to accept ownership of the K-9 dog, then the K-9 dog shall be offered to an organization described in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 free of charge. If both of the above fail, the K-9 dog shall only be sold to a qualified individual found capable of providing a good home to the animal."
NJ - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 15. Equestrian Activities. NJSA 5:15-1 to 5:15-1 12 This New Jersey equine activity liability statute fist begins by setting forth the legislative recognition of the importance of equine activities to the state and the fact that eliminating the inherent risks in engaging in them is impractical or impossible. Further, a participant and spectator are deemed to assume the inherent risks of equine animal activities created by equine animals, and is assumed to know the range of his ability and it shall be the duty of each participant to conduct himself within the limits of such ability. This acknowledgment of the assumption of risk serves as a complete bar of suit and shall serve as a complete defense to a suit against an operator by a participant for injuries resulting from the assumed risks (excluding the exceptions outlined in the statute).
NJ - Fur - Chapter 14. Fur Products. NJSA 56:14-1 to 56:14-3 This law represents New Jersey's fur labeling law. Under the 2009 law, no person shall sell or offer to sell any new coat, jacket, garment or other clothing apparel made wholly or in part of fur, regardless of the price or value of the fur, without the name of the animal(s) used to produce the fur and the name of the country of origin of any imported fur. A person who violates this act shall be subject to a penalty of not more than $500 for the first offense and not more than $1,000 for each subsequent offense, to be collected in a civil action by a summary proceeding.
NJ - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes NJSA 4:22-10 to 4:22-60; NJSA 2C:33-31 - 32 These New Jersey statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty provisions. According to the definitional section, "animal" or "creature" includes the whole brute creation. Exclusions under the act include state regulated scientific experiments, state sanctioned killing of animals, hunting of game, training of dogs, normal livestock operations, and the killing of rats and mice. With regard to livestock practices, no person may be cited or arrested for a first offense involving a minor or incidental violation of any provision of this title involving alleged cruelty to domestic livestock unless that person has first been issued a written warning.
NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJSA 4:19-9 This New Jersey statute provides that a person may humanely destroy a dog in self defense, or which is found chasing, worrying, wounding or destroying any sheep, lamb, poultry or domestic animal.
NJ - Ordinances - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-36 This New Jersey statute provides that the provisions of the dangerous dog act shall supersede any law, ordinance, or regulation concerning vicious or potentially dangerous dogs, any specific breed of dog, or any other type of dog inconsistent with this act enacted by any municipality, county, or county or local board of health.

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