Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
IN - Liens - 32-33-8-1 Feed and care bestowed upon livestock; mechanic's and tradesman lien I.C. 32-33-8-1 This statute allows the keeper of a livery stable or any person engaged in feeding horses, cattle, hogs, and other livestock to place a lien on any of the animals that he or she cares for.
IN - Domestic Violence - 34-26-5-9 Ex parte orders; authority and jurisdiction of court; relief available I.C. 34-26-5-9 This Indiana law allows a court to grant ex parte orders for protection in cases of domestic or family violence. Effective July 1, 2017, a court may grant a petitioner the exclusive possession, care, custody, or control of any animal owned, possessed, kept, or cared for by the petitioner, respondent, minor child of either the petitioner or respondent, or any other family or household member. Additionally, the court may prohibit a respondent from removing, transferring, injuring, concealing, harming, attacking, mistreating, threatening to harm, or otherwise disposing of an animal described in subdivision (c)(5).
IN - Vehicle - Chapter 30. Immunity for Removing a Domestic Animal from a Locked Motor Vehicle I.C. 34-30-30-1 - 4 This Indiana chapter on pets in motor vehicles was enacted in 2017. Under the chapter, "domestic animal" means a dog, cat or other vertebrate animal kept as a household pet (not including livestock). Section 34-30-30-3 provides that a person who forcibly enters a motor vehicle to remove a domestic animal from a motor vehicle is liable for one-half the cost of repairing the damage to the motor vehicle caused by the forcible entry. To meet this immunity, the person must reasonably believe that the domestic animal is in imminent danger of suffering serious bodily harm. The person must do all the following first: (1) determine the motor vehicle is locked and forcible entry is necessary to remove the domestic animal; (2) call 911 or attempt to contact law enforcement/animal control; (3) use no more force than is necessary to remove the domestic animal from the vehicle; and (4) remain with the animal until first responders or law enforcement arrive. The statute gives complete immunity from the costs of damage to any first responder, law enforcement/animal control officer, public safety government employee, or veterinary professional. Finally, the chapter immunizes the owner of the domestic animal from liability for bites or physical injury to the rescuer.
IN - Equine Activity Statute - Chapter 5. Equine Activities I.C. 34-31-5-1 to 5 This Indiana statute states that an equine activity sponsor or equine professional is not liable for an injury to a participant or the death of a participant resulting from an inherent risk of equine activities. Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes reckless disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant. The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs or warnings provided in contracts that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.
IN - Facility - 35-40-5-13 Witness under the age of sixteen allowed comfort I.C. 35-40-5-13 A child under 16 years old may bring a comfort item or comfort animal shall be allowed to remain in the courtroom with the child during the child's testimony unless the court finds that the defendant's constitutional right to a fair trial will be unduly prejudiced.
IN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes I.C. 35-46-3-0.1 - 15; 36-8-3-18; IC 35-38-2-2.8 These Indiana statutes set forth the anti-cruelty laws. As used in this chapter, "animal" does not include a human being. Among the provisions include anti-neglect, anti-animal fighting, and anti-abuse provisions. A person having a vertebrate animal in the person's custody who recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally abandons or neglects the animal commits cruelty to an animal, a Class A misdemeanor. A person who knowingly or intentionally purchases or possesses an animal for the purpose of using the animal in an animal fighting contest commits a Level 6 felony. A person who knowingly or intentionally abuses a vertebrate animal commits cruelty to an animal, a Class A misdemeanor, which may become a Level 6 felony under described circumstances.
ID - Pet Trusts - CHAPTER 7. TRUST ADMINISTRATION. I.C. § 15-7-601 This Idaho statute represents Idaho's relevant pet trust law. The law, while not termed a pet trust, provides that a person may create a "purpose trust." This trust does not require a beneficiary and may instead just name a person to enforce the trust.
ID - Slaughter, animal - Chapter 58. Public Health and Safety I.C. § 18-5803 - 5808 These Idaho statutes make certain activities involved with animal slaughter criminal. For example, it is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine to put the carcass of any dead animal into any river, creek, pond or street. It is a misdemeanor to slaughter or sell any animal that has been confined for 20 hours without water or 48 hours without food. The statutes also make it a felony if a mischievous animal is allowed to run at large and the animal kills a person.
ID - Ecoterrorism - Chapter 70. Trespass and Malicious Injuries to Property. I.C. § 18-7015, 7037, 7040, 7041, 7042 These laws comprise Idaho's animal enterprise interference/"ecoterrorism" laws. The state has a provision specific to trespass into enclosures for fur-bearing animals such as foxes. Additionally, § 18-7037 prohibits the unauthorized release of an animal, a bird, or an aquatic species which has been lawfully confined for agriculture, science, research, commerce, public propagation, protective custody, or education. This offense is a misdemeanor and the actor is liable for restitution that includes replacement costs, property damage, and even costs of repeating an experiment. Section § 18-7040 defines the crime of interference with agricultural research where a person knowingly damages property, obtains property with the intent of hinder the research; obtains access to the facility by misrepresentation to perform acts to damage or hinder the research; enters the facility with the intent to damage, alter, or duplicate data or records; or the release of an animal or injury to an animal at the facility. Violation is a felony with punishment of up to 20 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $10,000. The state also has a separate section on damage to aquaculture operations.
ID - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws I.C. § 18-7039; § 25-2801 - 2812; § 36-1101 These Idaho statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws regarding dogs at large and vicious dogs, and immunity for acts done by law enforcement dogs.
ID - Facility Dog - § 19-3023 Child summoned as witness I.C. § 19-3023 This statutes provides that when a child is summoned in a criminal matter, a parent, counselor, friend, or a facility dog may stay in the courtroom during the child's testimony, unless the court finds that the defendant will be unduly prejudiced. When a child is summoned to witness in any non-criminal matter, a facility dog will be allowed to remain in courtroom during the child's testimony.
ID - Livestock - Chapter 19. Miscellaneous Offenses Relating to Livestock I.C. § 25-1901 to 1910 This Idaho chapter concerns miscellaneous offenses relating to livestock. One law provides that any person other than the owner, his servant or agent who skins or removes from the carcass, the skin, hide, or pelt of any neat cattle or sheep found dead or perished, is guilty of a misdemeanor. Other topics include the slaughter of unbranded livestock, removal of hides from carcasses, altering brands and marks, and stealing the "services" of a bull.
ID - Dog License - Chapter 28. Dogs. I.C. § 25-2804 This Idaho statute provides that once a county board adopts a measure, sixty (60) days from the date of the board's meeting at which this measure is adopted, it shall be the duty of the sheriff of the county to seize and impound all unlicensed dogs at large, excluding those located in a municipality that has enacted a dog license law. A dog impounded under this provision may be killed in a humane manner after 5 days after there has been a "reasonable effort" to locate the owner.
ID - Dangerous Dogs running at large - Chapter 28. Dogs. I.C. § 25-2805 This Idaho statute provides that any person who lets his or her dog run at large after a complaint has been made to the sheriff shall be guilty of an infraction punishable as provided in section 18-113A, Idaho Code. Any person who lets his or her dog physically attack someone when not provoked shall be guilty of a misdemeanor in addition to any liability as provided in section 25-2806, Idaho Code. For a second or subsequent violation of this subsection, the court may, in the interest of public safety, order the owner to have the vicious dog destroyed or may direct the appropriate authorities to destroy the dog.
ID - Dangerous - § 25-2806. Liability for livestock and poultry killed by dogs I.C. § 25-2806 This Idaho statute provides that any owner whose dog that kills, worries, or wounds any livestock and poultry is liable to the owner of the same for the damages and costs of suit, to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction. Further, any person, on finding any dog, not on the premises of its owner or possessor, worrying, wounding, or killing any livestock or poultry may, at the time of so finding said dog, kill the same, without liability for damages.
ID - Dog, property - Chapter 28. Dogs. I.C. § 25-2807 This Idaho statute states that dogs are considered property. It further provides that no entity of state or local government may by ordinance or regulation prevent the owner of any dog from protecting it from loss by the use of an electronic locating collar.
ID - Fur - Chapter 30. Fur Farms I.C. § 25-3001 - 3007 In Idaho, fur farming is again defined as an agricultural pursuit, and the animals are considered to be livestock for purposes of Chapter 25. Idaho gives its Animal Industries Division the right to inspect fur farms at any time. Violation of any of the statutory provisions or associated regulations incurs a fine of not less than one hundred dollars ($100) nor more than five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each offense.
ID - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes I.C. § 25-3501 - 3521; I.C. § 18-6602 These Idaho statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions. Every person who is cruel to any animal and whoever having the charge or custody of any animal subjects any animal to cruelty is guilty of a misdemeanor. "Animal" means any vertebrate member of the animal kingdom, except humans. "Cruelty" is defined as the intentional and malicious infliction of pain, physical suffering, injury or death upon an animal as well as the negligent deprivation of necessary sustenance, among other things. Dogfighting and cockfighting exhibitions are also prohibited, but the rearing of gamecocks regardless of their later intended use is not prohibited.
ID - Exotic - Chapter 39. Importation or Possession of Deleterious Exotic Animals I.C. § 25-3901 - 3905 In Idaho, all apes and other nonhuman primates are classified as “deleterious exotic animals,” which are dangerous to the environment, livestock, agriculture, or wildlife of the state. According to Idaho’s legislature, it is in the public interest to strictly regulate the importation and possession of those animals.
ID - Predators - Chapter 11. Protection of Animals and Birds I.C. § 36-1101 to 1120 This Idaho chapter deals with restrictions on the taking of wildlife, protection of wildlife, and control of predators. Migratory birds are protected under the chapter. The chapter also establishes the right of any person to control, trap, or remove any wild animal damaging private property, within limitations set forth. In particular, the chapter states that wolves may be disposed of by livestock or domestic animal owners, their employees, agents and animal damage control personnel when the same are molesting or attacking livestock or domestic animals and it shall not be necessary to obtain any permit from the department. The section also sets up procedures for damage caused by game animals such as deer and elk as well as predators like black bears, grizzly bears, and mountain lions.
ID - Hunting - Chapter 15. Public Safety. I.C. § 36-1510 This section comprises Idaho's hunter harassment law. Under the law, no person shall intentionally interfere with the lawful taking or control of wildlife by another; intentionally harass, bait, drive or disturb any animal for the purpose of disrupting lawful pursuit; or damage or destroy in any way any lawful hunting blind with the intent to interfere. Idaho also expands these activities to include the harassment, intimidation, or threatening of any person who is or was lawfully engaged in the taking of fish or wildlife by such means as personal or written contact, telephone, e-mail, or a website.
ID - Endangered Species - Chapter 24. Species Conservation- Chapter 26. Fish and Game I.C. § 36-2401 - 2405, 36–1101 This Idaho law sets out the definitions related to state endangered species laws. It also establishes a delisting advisory team that is responsible for reviewing data related to state species proposed for delisting by the federal government. This team also submits management plans to the state fish and wildlife department.
ID - Wildlife - Chapter 7. Captive Wildlife I.C. § 36-701 to 716 This section comprises Idaho's captive wildlife provisions. Under the law, no person shall engage in any propagation or hold in captivity any species of big game animal found wild in this state, unless the person has been issued a license or permit by the director. All other species of mammals, birds or reptiles that are found in the wild in this state and are not species of special concern or threatened and endangered species, may be held in captivity without permit so long as the possessor retains proof that such wildlife was lawfully obtained. The laws concerning commercial wildlife farms are also included in this section. Additionally, there is also a section on the transition of wolves from federal to state management (36-715).
ID - Lien - § 45-805. Liens for services on or caring for property I.C. § 45-805 This Idaho law deals with liens livery or boarding or feed stable proprietors and others pasturing livestock who have a lien. If the liens are not paid within sixty days after the work is done, service rendered, or feed or pasturing supplied, the person in whose favor such special lien is created may proceed to sell the property at a licensed public livestock auction market, or if the lien is on equines, to sell the animals at a sale offered to the public, after giving ten days' notice to the owner or owners of the livestock and the state brand inspector. Requirements for proper notice are provided in the law.
ID - Ordinances - § 50-319. Animals at large--Regulation I.C. § 50-319 This Idaho law gives the authority to the mayor and city council to do things like regulate the running at large of domesticated animals, to impound animals running at large, and to manage pounds for such animals.
ID - Veterinary - CHAPTER 21. VETERINARIANS. I.C. § 54-2101 - 2121 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
ID - Equine Activity Liability - CHAPTER 18. EQUINE ACTIVITIES IMMUNITY ACT. I.C. § 6-1801 - 1802 This Idaho statute provides that an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional shall not be liable for any injury to or the death of a participant or equine engaged in an equine activity and no participant may maintain an action against an equine activity sponsor or professional. Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "equine," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional. Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.
ID - Predator - Chapter 58. Protection of Natural Resources (wolf declaration) I.C. § 67-5801 - 5807 The purpose of Chapter 58 is to provide an orderly, comprehensive plan for the protection of the natural resources of the state and for the suppression of dangers or threats. Section 5806 the Idaho legislature finds and declares that the state's citizens, businesses, hunting, tourism and agricultural industries, private property and wildlife, are immediately and continuously threatened and harmed by the sustained presence and growing population of Canadian gray wolves in the state of Idaho. The legislature states that "a disaster emergency is in existence as a result of the introduction of Canadian gray wolves, which have caused and continue to threaten vast devastation of Idaho's social culture, economy and natural resources."
ID - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws I.C. §§ 18-5811 - 5812B; I.C. §§ 56-701 - 708 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
IA - Hunting - 481A.125A. Remote control or internet hunting--criminal and civil penalties I.C.A. § 481A.125A This Iowa law prohibits “remote control or internet hunting." This involves the acts of offering such services for sale as well as taking, or assisting in the take of a wild animal kept on a hunting preserve by remote control or internet hunting. A person who violates this section is guilty of a serious misdemeanor. A second or subsequent violation of this section is punishable as a class “D” felony.
IA - Racing - 99D.1 to 99D.28. Pari-Mutuel Wagering I.C.A. § 99D.1 - 99D.28 This act legalizes and only applies to pari-mutuel wagering on dog and horse races in the state of Iowa. The act creates a state racing and gaming commission which has full jurisdiction to investigate applicants, adopt standards, and regulate all horse and dog races governed by the act. Organizations that wish to conduct horse and dog racing must apply to the commission for a license and meet the requirements. Tracks that are licensed to race dogs are required to maintain a racing dog adoption program.
IA - Domestic Violence - Chapter 236. Domestic Abuse I.C.A. §§ 236.3, 236.4, 236.5 Iowa now allows the court to grant petitioners exclusive care, possession, or control of any pets or companion animals in both temporary and permanent orders. The animals can belong to the petitioner, the abuser, or a minor child of the petitioner or the abuser. The court can also order the abuser to stay away from the animals and not take, hide, bother, attack, threaten, or otherwise get rid of the pet or companion animal.
IN - Wild Animals - Chapter 26. Wild Animal Permit IC 14-22-26-1 - 6 This set of laws deals with Wild Animal Permits in Indiana. Section 3 allows the Director to adopt rules that require permits to possess wild animals protected by laws or rules. The director may also adopt a rule that requires a permit to possess a wild animal that may be harmful or dangerous to plants or animals. Permits under this chapter may be suspended by the director and animal may be seized if the animal is in a position to harm another animal or the life or health of the animal is in peril. This chapter does not apply to licensed commercial animal dealers, zoological parks, circuses, or carnivals.
IN - Bite - Indiana Dog Bite Laws IC 15-20-1-1 - 7; IC 35-47-7-4 These Indiana statutes provide the state's dog bite laws. If a dog, without provocation, bites any person who is peaceably conducting himself in any place where he may be required to go for the purpose of discharging any duty imposed upon him by the laws of this state or by the laws or postal regulations of the United States of America, the owner of such dog may be held liable for any damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness. It also establishes the conditions under which an owner will be criminally liable if his or her dog bites another person. In Indiana, physicians treating dog bite injuries are required to report such injuries not more than 72-hours after the incident.
IN - Spay, neuter - Chapter 4. Spay-Neuter Requirement for Animal Care Facilities IC 15-20-4-1 - 5 This Indiana chapter added in 2016 concerns the spay-neuter requirements for animal care facilities. Beginning July 1, 2021, except as provided in this chapter, a companion animal shall be spayed or neutered before adoption from an animal care facility.
IN - Law enforcement - Chapter 42.5. Burial with Law Enforcement Animals or Service Animals IC 23-14-42.5-1 - 7 This chapter allows the cremated remains of a deceased law enforcement or military animal of a deceased owner to be scattered, placed, or interred in a manner described in this subsection before, after, or in conjunction with the interment of the remains of the deceased owner. The deceased animal's cremated remains may be scattered or placed on top of the deceased owner's burial plot or interred on top of the deceased owner's burial plot as long as the interment of the deceased animal's cremated remains does not encroach on a neighboring burial plot, involve disinterment of the owner, or involve digging greater than one foot of depth. The person owning the deceased animal must consent in writing and give this consent to the cemetery owner. If the deceased owner does not own the animal at the time of the deceased animal's death, the deceased owner may provide written notice in his or her last will, in a written designation to the cemetery, or in a funeral planning declaration.
WA - Initiative - Initiative 1401, Trafficking of animal species threatened with extinction Initiative 1401 (2015) Initiative 1401 would amend several sections of the Washington code (RCW 77.15.085, 77.15.100, and 77.15.425; reenacting and amending RCW 77.08.010). This measure would prohibit sale, purchase, trading, or distribution of elephant, rhinoceros, tiger, lion, leopard, cheetah, pangolin, marine turtle, shark, or ray species listed as endangered or vulnerable in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species or the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s red list, including items made from listed species. Violations would be a gross misdemeanor or class-C felony. It would exempt certain distributions, including musical instruments and transfers for educational purposes. The measure passed by 71% voting "yes" for the initiative.
WA - Initiatives - Washington Initiative 713 (trapping) Initiative 713 (2000) This Washington initiative passed in 2000 made it a gross misdemeanor to capture an animal with a steel-jawed leghold trap, neck snare, or other body-gripping trap. The director of fish and wildlife could grant special circumstance exceptions. It is also unlawful to knowingly buy or sell an animal pelt trapped in this manner. It is also a gross misdemeanor to poison any animal using sodium fluoroacetate (Compound 1080) or sodium cyanide (violators lose trapping licenses).
OR - Initiatives - Oregon Initiative 97 (Bans Body-Gripping Animal Traps) Initiative 97 (2000) (failed) This 2000 Oregon initiative would have eliminated the use of steel-jawed, leghold or other body-gripping traps and poisons. It was defeated by voters, 58.5% to 41.2%.
WA - Initiatives - Initiative Measure No. 1130 (AN ACT Relating to the prevention of farm animal cruelty) Initiative Measure No. 1130 (2011) This measure would prohibit confining egg-laying hens, as defined, in stacked cages or cages that prevent hens from turning around freely, lying down, standing up, or fully extending their wings. It would also prohibit selling eggs produced by hens thus confined. Violations would be a gross misdemeanor. The measure would not apply to medical research, veterinary treatment, transportation, certain temporary confinements, exhibitions, or during humane slaughter. The measure would take effect on January 1, 2018. Due to changes in signature requirements announced by the Washington Secretary of State to avoid duplication or error, the initiative did not receive an adequate number of signatures to appear on the ballot.
ND - Initiatives - Prevention of Animal Cruelty Initiative, Measure 5 Initiative, Measure 5 (2012) This initiated statutory measure would create section 36-21.1-02.1 of the North Dakota Century Code. This measure would make it a class C felony for an individual to maliciously and intentionally harm a living dog, cat or horse and provide a court with certain sentencing options. The measure would not apply to production agriculture, or to lawful activities of hunters and trappers, licensed veterinarians, scientific researchers, or to individuals engaged in lawful defense of life or property. It failed at the polls in 2012 (34.6% yes).
Ecuador - Dog control - Acuerdo Nº 0116 Interministerial Agreement for the Responsible Ownership of Dogs This regulation has been in effect since 2009, and it seeks to regulate the responsible ownership of dogs. It focuses on those breeds that are not recommended as pets because they are considered dangerous. This is with the purpose of protecting the health and life of the citizens (Article 1). This regulation establishes the standards of welfare for the keeping of dogs, duties, and obligations of owners and keepers. It regulates the breeding and commercialization of dogs, population control, dogs as companion animals, dangerous dogs, working dogs, and service dogs.
OH - Initiatives - Issue 1 Prohibition of the hunting of mourning doves Issue 1, 1998 (failed) This state issue, rejected by voters in 1998, would have amended Section 1531.02 of the Ohio Revised Code to prohibit the hunting or taking of mourning doves in Ohio. The proposed law specifically would have amended Section 1531.02 of the Ohio Revised Code by adding the words "NO PERSON SHALL HUNT OR TAKE A MOURNING DOVE." The measure failed with only 40.5% voting for the proposition.
Tunisia - Cruelty - Animal Transport (in French) Journal officiel de la République tunisienne nº 6, 19 janvier 2007, p. 189 à 191. This Order, in French, establishes the technical and sanitary requirements for the transport of animals subject to the procedures of identification. These conditions are designed to ensure the comfort of the animal.
KS - Racing - 74-8801 to 74-8842. Parimutuel Wagering K. S. A. §§ 74-8801 to 74-8845 This statute creates the Kansas Racing and Gaming Commission. The Commission has the power to observe and inspect all racetracks and is responsible for promulgating regulations including regulations establishing what drugs and at what levels are allowable in the blood or urine of horses and greyhounds. The statute specifies age limits for horses and greyhounds to be able to race. Horses cannot compete until they reach 2 years of age. Greyhounds cannot compete in a race until they reach the age of 15 months. In order to construct or own a racetrack facility a license must be obtained from the Commission.
KS - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty and Animal Fighting Laws K. S. A. 21-6411 - 6418; 21-5504; 60-5401 The Kansas anti-cruelty statutes define cruelty to animals as knowingly killing, injuring, maiming, torturing, burning or mutilating any animal. Also included as cruelty are abandoning any animal, failing to provide food, horse-tripping, and poisoning any domestic animal, unlawful disposition of animals, dog and cock-fighting. Cruelty to animals may be a misdemeanor or a felony. Exceptions are made for such things as veterinary practices, research experiments, rodeo and farming practices, euthanasia, and pest control. It is also illegal to allow a dangerous animal to run at large or to engage in sodomy with an animal.
KS - Wildlife Possession - Chapter 32. Wildlife, Parks and Recreation. K. S. A. 32-1005 Knowingly capturing, killing, or possessing for profit, or selling, bartering, purchasing or offering to do so as well as the shipping or transportation of wildlife constitutes the commercialization of wildlife. The possession of listed wildlife for commercial purposes is considered a "nonperson" misdemeanor or felony depending on whether the aggregate value is greater than $1000. Commerce in protected wildlife (including eagles) incurs at least the minimum fine and may also result in the confiscation of equipment, license sanctions, and restitution.
KS - Hunting - Unlawful Acts. 32-1014. Obstruction or impeding of lawful activities K. S. A. 32-1014 This Kansas law reflects the state's hunter harassment provision. Under the law, no person shall willfully obstruct or impede the participation of any individual in the lawful activity of hunting, furharvesting or fishing. The law does not apply to law enforcement and does not limit the right of landowners or their tenants to limit trespass.
KS - Exotic Pets - Chapter 32. Wildlife, Parks and Recreation. K. S. A. 32-1301 to 1312 This set of Kansas statutes comprises the state's dangerous regulated animals act. Under the Act, a "dangerous regulated animal" means a live or slaughtered parts of lions, tigers, leopards, jaguars, cheetahs and mountain lions, or any hybrid thereof; bears or any hybrid thereof; and all non-native, venomous snakes. Except as provided in this section, it is unlawful for a person to possess, slaughter, sell, purchase or otherwise acquire a dangerous regulated animal.
KS - Rehabilitation - 32-953. Rehabilitation permit K. S. A. 32-953 This Kansas law states that a rehabilitation permit is required to perform wildlife rehabilitation services.

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