Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
VA - Rabies - § 3.2-6523. Inoculation for rabies at animal shelters Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6523

This Virginia statute provides that animals at a shelter may be inoculated by a licensed veterinary technician who is under the direct supervision of a veterinarian when an emergency rabies ordinance has been issued by a city or county.

VA - Rabies - § 3.2-6525. Regulations to prevent spread of rabies Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6525

This Virginia statute provides that the governing body of any county, city or town may adopt such ordinances, regulations or other measures as may be deemed reasonably necessary to prevent the spread within its boundaries of the disease of rabies, and to regulate and control the running at large within its boundaries of vicious or destructive dogs. Penalties may be provided for the violation of any such ordinances.  The governing body of any county that has adopted the urban county executive form of government may adopt an ordinance creating a program for the distribution of oral rabies vaccine within its boundaries to prevent the spread of rabies.

VA - Rabies - § 32.1-48.3. Regulations of Commissioner covering local ordinances and requirements Va. Code Ann. § 32.1-48.3 This Virginia statute specifically authorizes preemption of local control in the event of a rabies outbreak.  It states that if the governing body of the county or city in which the outbreak exists does not adopt ordinances, regulations and measures to prohibit the running at large of dogs and to prevent the spread of rabies, the State Health Commissioner is authorized to adopt regulations providing for the matters contained in such sections and to enforce the same in the same manner as if they had been specifically adopted by the governing body of the county or city involved.
VA - Trusts - § 64.2-726. Trust for care of animal VA Code Ann. § 64.2-726

This Virginia pet trust law becomes effective July 1, 2006.  The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

VA - Vehicle - § 29.1-539. Keeping deer or bear struck by motor vehicle; VA Code Ann. § 29.1-539 Any person driving a motor vehicle who collides with a deer or bear may, upon compliance with relevant provisions, keep the deer or bear for his or her own use. The person shall immediately report the accident to a conservation police officer or other law-enforcement officer. If the officer believes that the deer or bear was killed by the collision, he shall award the animal to the person claiming the deer or bear, and shall give the person a certificate to that effect.
VA - Vehicle - § 3.2-6504.1. Civil immunity; forcible entry of motor vehicle to remove unattended companion animal. Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6504.1 This Virginia law was signed by the Governor on April 1, 2016. The law provides that no law-enforcement officer, firefighter, emergency medical services personnel, or animal control officer who in good faith forcibly enters a motor vehicle in order to remove an unattended companion animal that is at risk of serious bodily injury or death shall be liable for any property damage to the vehicle entered or injury to the animal resulting from such forcible entry and removal of the animal, unless such property damage or injury results from gross negligence or willful or wanton misconduct.
VA - Veterinary - Chapter 38. Veterinary Medicine. Va. Code Ann. § 54.1-3800 - 3813

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

Vermont Law 1854-1855: Cruelty to Animals 1854 Vt. Acts & Resolves 51.1

Vermont's anti-cruelty law from 1854

Vermont Laws: Act 34: 1846 1846 Vt. Acts & Resolves 34

Act 34 from 1846 concerns the amendment of the statute entitled "Offences against private property."  Specifically, the act concerns the statutes that covers cruelty to animals and larceny of animals.

Virginia General Laws 1893: Cruelty to Animals Va. Code Ann. §§ 4554-4567 (Michie 1913)

A collection of Virginia laws from 1893 concerning the punishment and enforcement against cruelty to animals.  The laws cover cruelty to animals, power of agents of the court to search for cruelty to animals, and the punishment for shooting pigeons among other things.

VT - Assistance animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws 13 V.S.A. § 355; 9 V.S.A. § 4502 - 4507; 23 V.S.A. § 1057

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

VT - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes 13 V.S.A. § 351 - 400; 20 V.S.A. § 2365b; 24 V.S.A. § 1943

This Vermont statutory section contains the amended anti-cruelty and animal fighting laws.  Animal cruelty, as defined by § 352, occurs when a person overworks, overloads, tortures, torments, abandons, administers poison to, cruelly beats or mutilates an animal, or deprives an animal which a person owns or possesses of adequate food, water, shelter, rest , sanitation, or necessary medical attention.  It is also animal cruelty  if one owns, possesses, keeps or trains an animal engaged in an exhibition of fighting.  The section excludes scientific research activities, hunting, farming, and veterinary activities among others.

VT - Cruelty - § 5784. Forcible entry of motor vehicle to remove unattended child or animal 12 V.S.A. § 5784 This Vermont law, enacted in 2016, provides that any person who forcibly enter a motor vehicle for the purpose of removing a child or animal from the motor vehicle shall not be subject to civil liability for damages arising from the forcible entry if certain steps are followed.
VT - Dogs, Wolf-hybrids - Consolidated Dog Laws 20 V.S.A. § 3511 - 3513; 3541 - 3817, 3901 - 3915, 4301 - 4304; 10 V.S.A. § 5001 - 5007, § 4748

These Vermont statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing and control laws for both domestic dogs and wolf-hybrids, laws concerning the sale of dogs, and various wildlife/hunting laws that implicate dogs.

VT - Domestic Violence - § 1103. Requests for relief. 15 V.S.A. § 1103 Any family or household member may seek relief from abuse by another family or household member on behalf of him- or herself or his or her children by filing a complaint under this chapter. Included among the relief that the court can grant is an order concerning the possession, care, and control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held as a pet by either party or a minor child residing in the household in section (c)(2)(G).
VT - Education - § 912. Student's right of refusal; animal dissection 16 V.S.A. § 912 This Vermont law gives a student in a public elementary or secondary school (or approved independent school) a right to be excused from lessons requiring a student to dissect, vivisect, or otherwise destroy an animal, or observe any of these activities. Each school district must establish procedures for a student to exercise this right and alternatives methods of learning the material covered. School districts must also adopt a statement that no student shall be discriminated against based on his or her decision to exercise the right to be excused afforded by this section.
VT - Endangered Species - Chapter 123. Protection of Endangered Species 10 V.S.A. § 5401 - 10

These Vermont statutes set out the state's endangered species provisions, including the related definitions, rules for listing species, and regulations for establishing the committees.  Violation of the provisions against taking incur criminal enforcement and restitution.  Interestingly, there is a provision that provides for the location of listed endangered species to be kept confidential.

VT - Equine - § 1039. Equine activities; acceptance of inherent risks 12 V.S.A. § 1039

This statute represents Vermont's equine activity liability law. Under the Act, no person shall be liable for an injury to, or the death of, a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities, insofar as those risks are necessary to the equine activity and obvious to the person injured. An equine activity sponsor may (it does not say "shall") post and maintain signs which contain the warning notice specified in this subsection.

VT - Exotic pet, wildlife - § 4709. Importation, stocking wild animals 10 V.S.A. § 4709

This Vermont law provides that a person may not bring into the state or possess any live wild bird or animal of any kind, unless the person obtains from the commissioner a permit to do so. Applicants shall pay a permit fee of $100.00.

VT - Fur - Chapter 173. Domestic Fur-Bearing Animals 6 V.S.A. § 3071 - 3073

Note: §§3071 to 3073. Repealed by 2015, No. 61, § 13, eff. June 17, 2015. Under these Vermont statutes, the owner of domestic fur-bearing animals enjoy the same property rights as any other domestic animal. No one may enter the enclosure of, or knowingly and wilfully kill, trap, or injure a fur-bearing animal without permission from the owner. A violation may result in a fine of up to $200 and/or imprisonment up to six months.

VT - Humane Slaughter - Humane Slaughter of Livestock 6 V.S.A. § 3131 - 3134

These statutes comprise Vermont's humane slaughter provisions.  The law requires the humane slaughter of all commercial livestock with a "humane method" defined as a method whereby the animal is rendered insensible to pain by mechanical, electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast or cut (with exemptions for religious ritual slaughter).  A person who violates this chapter shall be fined not more than $100.00 nor less than $50.00 or imprisoned not more than ninety days, or both, and in addition, the secretary may seek an injunction against a slaughterer.

VT - Hunting - § 4714. Importation and possession of animals for hunting 10 V.S.A. § 4714

This Vermont law states that a person shall not import or possess any live animal for the purpose of taking by hunting, unless the commissioner has issued the person an importation and possession permit.

VT - Hunting - § 4502 Uniform point system; revocation of license. 10 V.S.A. § 4502 Vermont has a point system for hunting licenses similar to that used for driver's licenses.   Certain enumerated violations, including taking bear or deer with dogs, earn points which can result in the suspension or revocation of a hunting license.    A game warden may shoot a dog who is pursuing a deer or moose close enough to endanger its life, or a fine may be issued.
VT - Hunting - § 4708. Interference with hunting, fishing or trapping 10 V.S.A. § 4708

This Vermont law reflects the state's hunter harassment provision. The law states that a person shall not intentionally interfere with the lawful taking of fish or wild animals. This includes things like tampering with traps, nets, baits, or firearms; by placing himself or herself in a position, for the purpose of interfering, that hinders or prevents hunting, trapping, or fishing; or by engaging in an activity, for the purpose of interfering, that drives, harasses, disturbs, or is likely to disturb wildlife or fish.

VT - Hunting - § 4715. Remote-control hunting 10 V.S.A. § 4715

This Vermont statute prevents remote-control hunting. No one may take a wild or captive animal using a remote-control hunting device if the person is in Vermont. No person shall establish or operate a remote-control hunting site in Vermont, or import, export, or possess a wild or captive animal to be taken by a remote-control hunting device.

VT - Impound - Sub Chapter 2. Pounds and Impounds. 20 V.S.A. § 3381 - 3485

The following Vermont statutes require that each organized Vermont town maintain a pound or else the town will be fined $30.00. The statutes also provide provisions for impounding an animal, retrieving an impounded animal, failing to retrieve an impounded animal, and assessing damages of an impounded animal, amongst other topics.

VT - Lien - § 2075. Lien for keeping or pasturing animals 9 V.S.A. § 2075 A person to whom charges are due for pasturing, boarding, or keeping domestic animals placed with the consent of the owner thereof in his or her care, if the charges become due while such animals remain in his or her possession, may retain the same until such charges are paid. After 30 days when the charges are due, he or she may sell the animals in the manner provided for the sale of property under a lien for repairs, if such charges remain unpaid.
VT - Lost dog - Article 2. Killing Unlicensed Dogs; Subchapter 5. Control of Rabies 20 V.S.A. § 3621 - 3626; 20 V.S.A. § 3806 - 3809

These Vermont statute provide the law for seizure, confinement of, and destruction of dogs and domestic wolf-hybrids.  It also includes a warrant form necessary for local authorities to seize and impound an offending dog or wolf-hybrid.

VT - Lost Property - Chapter 11. Lost Property 27 V.S.A. § 1101 - 1110

These statutes comprise Vermont's lost property provisions.

VT - Ordinances - § 2291. Enumeration of powers (dog ordinances) 24 V.S.A. § 2291

This Vermont statute provides that, for the purpose of promoting the public health, safety, welfare and convenience, a town, city or incorporated village shall have the power t o regulate the keeping of dogs, and to provide for their leashing, muzzling or restraint.

VT - Trusts - § 408. Trust for care of animal 14A V.S.A. § 408

This Vermont law enacted in 2009 allows the creation of a trust to provide care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

VT - Veterinary - CHAPTER 44. Veterinary Medicine. 26 V.S.A. § 2401 - 2432

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

WA - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws West's RCWA 9.91.170 - 175; 28A.642.010; 49.60.010 - 040, 215, 218, 222; 224; 225; 49.60.370 - 380; 49.90.010; 70.84.010 - 900

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

WA - Beavers - 77.32.585. Release of wild beavers West's RCWA 77.32.585

This Washington law states that the department shall permit the release of wild beavers on public and private lands with agreement from the property owner under specified conditions.

WA - Coyotes - 9.41.185. Coyote getters West's RCWA 9.41.185

This Washington law provides that the use of "coyote getters" is not a violation of law when their use is authorized by the state department of agriculture and/or the state department of fish and wildlife in cooperative programs with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The purpose must be to control or eliminate coyotes that are harmful to livestock or game animals.

WA - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws (Chapter 16.52) West's RCWA 16.52.010 - 350

This section of statutes contains Washington's anti-cruelty provisions.  Under the section, "animal" means any nonhuman mammal, bird, reptile, or amphibian.  WA ST 16.52.205 and WA ST 16.52.207 are the primary anti-cruelty provisions that categorize cruelty in either the first or second degree.  A person is guilty of animal cruelty in the first degree (a class C felony) when he or she intentionally inflicts substantial pain on, causes physical injury to, or kills an animal by a means causing undue suffering, or forces a minor to inflict unnecessary pain, injury, or death on an animal.  A person is guilty of animal cruelty in the second degree (a misdemeanor) if, under circumstances not amounting to first degree animal cruelty, the person knowingly, recklessly, or with criminal negligence inflicts unnecessary suffering or pain upon an animal.  An owner of an animal is guilty of animal cruelty in the second degree the owner knowingly, recklessly, or with criminal negligence fails to provide the animal with necessary food, water, shelter, rest, sanitation, ventilation, space, or medical attention and the animal suffers unnecessary or unjustifiable physical pain as a result of the failure, or if he or she abandons the animal.

WA - Dangerous Dog - 16.08.040. Dog bites. Liability and Dangerous dogs and related provisions. West's RCWA 16.08.010 - 100

This Washington statute outlines the state's dangerous dog laws.  Under the law, the owner or keeper of any dog shall be liable to the owner of any animal killed or injured by such dog for the amount of damages sustained in a civil action.  Further, there is strict liability for the owner of any dog that bites any person while in a public place or lawfully on a private place including the property of the owner of such dog, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.  However, proof of provocation of the attack by the injured person shall be a complete defense to an action for damages. 

WA - Dangerous Dog - 16.08.070. Dangerous dogs and related definitions West's RCWA 16.08.070

This Washington statute provides the definitions related to dangerous dogs, including dangerous dog, potentially dangerous dog, severe injury, and owner, among others.

WA - Dangerous Dog - 16.08.090. Dangerous dogs--Requirements for restraint West's RCWA 16.08.090

This Washington statute outlines the state and local provisions related to dangerous or potentially dangerous dogs.  It first provides that it is unlawful for an owner of a dangerous dog to permit the dog to be outside the proper enclosure unless the dog is muzzled and restrained by a substantial chain or leash and under physical restraint of a responsible person.  Potentially dangerous dogs shall be regulated only by local, municipal, and county ordinances and nothing in this section limits restrictions local jurisdictions may place on owners of potentially dangerous dogs.

WA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws West's RCWA 4.24.410; 9.08.010 - 90; West's RCWA 9A.76.200; West's RCWA 9.91.170 - 175; 16.10.010 - 40; 16.54.010 - 40; 16.70.010 - 60; 36.49.020 - 070; 77.12.315; 77.15.240, 245, 440; 77.32.525; 77.32.540

These Washington statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include vaccination requirements, dog control zones in municipalities, dangerous dog laws, and provisions concerning hunting with dogs.

WA - Domestic Violence - 26.50.060. Relief--Duration--Realignment of designation of parties--Award of costs, service fees, and a West's RCWA 26.50.060

This Washington law reflects the state's provision for protective orders in cases of domestic abuse. In addition to other forms of relief, a court may also order possession and use of essential personal effects. Personal effects may include pets. The court may order that a petitioner be granted the exclusive custody or control of any pet owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by the petitioner, respondent, or minor child residing with either the petitioner or respondent and may prohibit the respondent from interfering with the petitioner's efforts to remove the pet. The court may also prohibit the respondent from knowingly coming within, or knowingly remaining within, a specified distance of specified locations where the pet is regularly found.

WA - Eagle - 77.12.650. Protection of bald eagles and their habitats--Cooperation required West's RCWA 77.12.650, West's RCWA 77.12.655 This outlines the rules and cooperative agreements mandated for the protection of eagles and their habitats in the state of Washington to prevent the eagle from becoming endangered or threatened.  The administrative rules further describe the partners involved, which include private landowners, and the delineations of habitat buffer zones to protect roosting sites.
WA - Ecoterrorism - 4.24.570. Acts against animals in research or educational facilities West's RCWA 4.24.570 - 580

These Washington sections concern interference with animal research or educational facilities as well as facilities that keep animals for agricultural or veterinary purposes. Both sections provide that any person or organization that plans or assists in the development of a plan to commit an intentional tort described in the laws is liable for damages to the same extent as a person who has committed the tort. However, membership in a liable organization does not in itself establish the member's liability under this subsection. Section 4.24.580 allows an individual employed with an animal facility to obtain injunctive relief if he or she has reason to believe that he or she may be injured. This includes obtaining an injunction to prevent harassment.

WA - Endangered Species - Chapter 77.15. Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Code West's RCWA 77.15.120, 130, 135, 410, 420, 425, 430

Under Washington endangered species provisions, a person is guilty of unlawful taking of endangered fish or wildlife in the second degree if person hunts for, fishes for, possesses, maliciously harasses, or kills fish or wildlife, or possesses or intentionally destroys the nests or eggs of fish or wildlife; the fish or wildlife is designated by the commission as endangered; and the taking of the fish or wildlife or the destruction of the nests or eggs has not been authorized.   Additionally, a person is guilty of unlawful taking of endangered fish or wildlife in the first degree if the person has been previously convicted under the above provision within a five-year time period.  Once convicted of unlawful taking of endangered fish or wildlife in the first degree (a class C felony), any licenses or tags used in connection with the crime are revoked and the person's privileges to hunt, fish, trap, or obtain licenses under this title are suspended for two years.

WA - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 4.24. Special Rights of Action and Special Immunities. West's RCWA 4.24.530 - 540

This Washington section provides that an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant engaged in an equine activity, nor may he or she maintain an action against or recover from an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional for an injury to or the death while engaged in an equine activity.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.

WA - Exotic Pet - Chapter 16.30. Dangerous Wild Animals West's RCWA 16.30.005 - 900

This Washington chapter passed in 2007 regulates the keeping of dangerous wild animals. By definition, a potentially dangerous wild animal includes, among others, lions, tigers, captive-bred cougars, jaguars, cheetahs, leopards, wolves, (but excluding wolf-hybrids), bears, hyenas, non-human primates, elephants, rhinoceroses, certain reptiles, and venomous snakes. A person shall not own, possess, keep, harbor, bring into the state, or have custody or control of a potentially dangerous wild animal. A person in legal possession of a potentially dangerous wild animal prior to July 22, 2007, and who is the legal possessor of the animal may keep possession of the animal for the remainder of the animal's life.

WA - Fish - 77.15.250. Unlawful release of fish, shellfish, or wildlife--Penalty--Unlawful release of deleterious exotic wildlif West's RCWA 77.15.250

Under this Washington statute, a person is guilty of unlawfully releasing, planting, possessing, or placing fish, shellfish, or wildlife (gross misdemeanor) if the person knowingly releases such animals within the state, and the animals have not been classified as deleterious wildlife. A person is guilty of unlawfully releasing, planting, possessing, or placing deleterious exotic wildlife (class C felony) if the person knowingly releases animals classified as deleterious.

WA - Fur - Chapter 77.15. Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Code (Unlawful Trapping Provisions) West's RCWA 77.15.190 - 194

This set of Washington laws describes unlawful trapping. A person is guilty of misdemeanor unlawful trapping if the person sets out traps without the necessary licenses or permits; violates any rule on seasons or bag limits; or fails to identify the owner of the traps or devices with a tag or inscription. The director may revoke the trapper's license of a person placing unauthorized traps on private property and may remove those traps. It is unlawful to use or authorize the use of any steel-jawed leghold trap, neck snare, or other body-gripping trap to capture any mammal for recreation or commerce in fur except as provided in Section 77.15.194.

WA - Health - Chapter 16.36. Animal Health West's RCWA 16.36.005 - 160

These laws set forth the laws for importation and health requirements of certain imported animals. It also allows the director to establish inspection procedures for the transportation of animals. A section provides that it is unlawful for a person to bring an animal into Washington state without first securing a certificate of veterinary inspection, reviewed by the state veterinarian of the state of origin, verifying that the animal meets the Washington state animal health

WA - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 16.50. Humane Slaughter of Livestock. West's RCWA 16.50.100 - 900

The Washington humane slaughter laws begin with a statement that it is declared to be the policy of the state of Washington to require that the slaughter of all livestock, and the handling of livestock in connection with slaughter, shall be carried out only by humane methods.  Humane methods are defined are those methods whereby the animal is rendered insensible to pain by mechanical, electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective, before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast or cut; or methods in accordance with the ritual requirements of any religious faith whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain.  "Livestock" is limited under the statute to cattle, calves, sheep, swine, horses, mules and goats.  Note that the director may, by administrative order, exempt a person from compliance with this chapter for a period of not to exceed six months if he finds that an earlier compliance would cause such person undue hardship.  Violation of the act constitutes a misdemeanor and is subject to a fine of not more than two hundred fifty dollars or confinement in the county jail for not more than ninety days.

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