Mississippi Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
MS - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Miss. Code Ann. § 43-6-151 - 155; § 43-6-1 - 15; § 97-41-21; § 63-3-1111

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

MS - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes Miss. Code Ann. § 97-41-1 - 23; Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-59

This section constitutes Mississippi's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions, which were recently amended in 2011. The pertinent anti-cruelty law, § 97-41-1, states that any person who intentionally or with criminal negligence overrides, overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, unjustifiably injures, deprives of necessary sustenance, food, or drink, cruelly beats, or needlessly mutilates any living creature , is guilty of a misdemeanor. The cat and dog cruelty provision, § 97-41-16, was significantly amended in 2011. This section, known as the "Mississippi Dog and Cat Pet Protection Law of 2011," makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally or with criminal negligence wound, deprive of adequate food, water, or shelter, or carry or confine in a cruel manner, any domesticated cat or dog. Aggravated cruelty occurs when a person with malice intentionally tortures, mutilates, maims, burns, starves or disfigures any domesticated dog or cat.

MS - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 3. Crimes Against the Person. Miss. Code Ann. § 97-3-45

This Mississippi law makes an owner liable for manslaughter if he or she wilfully allows a mischievous animal to go at large, or it goes at large because the owner fails to exercise ordinary care, and the animal, while at large or not confined, kills any human being who took reasonable precautions to avoid the animal.

MS - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Miss. Code Ann. § 19-5-50; § 19-25-83; § 19-5-3; § 21-19-9; § 21-21-5; § 37-7-342; § 41-53-1 - 13; § 45-3-52; § 49-7-42; § 69-29-2; § 73-39-89; § 95-5-19 - 21

These Mississippi statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions relating to hunting with dogs, local dog ordinances, and liability of owners for damage done by dogs.

MS - Dog Licenses - Chapter 53. Dogs and Rabies Control. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-53-11

This Mississippi statute provides that it is the lawful duty for any sheriff, conservation officer or peace officer of a county or municipality to kill any dog above the age of three (3) months found running at large on whose neck there is no such collar and tag or who are not inoculated according to state law. No action shall be maintained by the owner for such killing.  However, the statute then goes on to say that it is the duty of such officer to first impound the dogs for five days and give a description of the dog to the sheriff.

MS - Dog Theft - Chapter 17. Crimes Against Property Miss. Code. Ann. § 97-17-51

This Mississippi Statute provides that a person commits a felonious offense by stealing, taking and carrying away any dog that is the property of another. If the person who commits the offense is indicted and convicted for stealing the dog, he or she shall be punished by a fine not more than $500, imprisonment not more than 6 months, or both, or imprisoned in the penitentiary not less than 1 year nor more than 2 years.

MS - Ecoterrorism - Animal Research or Exhibiting Facilities Protection Act Miss. Code Ann. § 69-29-301 to 69-29-315

This section comprises Mississippi's Animal Research or Exhibiting Facilities Protection Act. The act prohibits a person, without the effective consent of the owner, to acquire or otherwise exercise control over an animal facility with the intent to deprive the owner of the facility, animal or property and to disrupt or damage the enterprise conducted at the animal facility. A person is also prohibited from entering and remaining concealed at a facility with the intent to damage or disrupt the facility. Violation for damaging a facility is a fine of up to $10,000 and/or imprisonment for up to 3 years. Violation for illegal entry with an intent to damage or disrupt the facility results in a fine of up to $5,000 and/or imprisonment up to 1 year.

MS - Endangered Species - Chapter 5. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act Miss. Code Ann. § 49-5-101 to 49-5-119

These Mississippi statutes provide the short title for the Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act, the definitions for the Act, the legislative findings, and the associated regulations of the Act.  Violations under the Act may incur up to a $1,000 fine and/or one-year term of imprisonment as well as equipment confiscation.

MS - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 11. Liability Exemption for Livestock Shows and Equine Activities Miss. Code Ann. § 95-11-1 to 95-11- 7

This Mississippi statute embodies the the intent of the Legislature to encourage equine and livestock activities by limiting the civil liability of those involved in such activities.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine or livestock activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.

MS - Exotic pet - Chapter 8. Importation, Sale and Possession of Inherently Dangerous Wild Animals. Miss. Code Ann. § 49-8-1 to 49-8-19

This Mississippi chapter states that it is in the public interest to ensure the public health, safety and welfare by strictly regulating the importation, sale, transfer and possession of those wild animals inherently dangerous to humans. Several species are listed under this section as inherently dangerous to humans, including non-human primates, wolves, bears, hyenas, big cats, and hippopotamus, among others. It is unlawful for a person to import, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal classified inherently dangerous by law or regulation unless that person holds a permit. Those persons who were in possession of such animals on or before May 1, 1997 were able to continue possession provided that they complied with the permit process. Prior to the issuance of a permit, the applicant must have provided proof of liability insurance in the amount of $100,000.00 for each wild animal up to a maximum of $1,000,000.00.

MS - Horses - Slaughter (Chapter 33. Meat, Meat-Food and Poultry Regulation and Inspection) Miss. Code Ann. § 75-33-3

Construes the phrase "unfit for human consumption" in the very broad Mississippi Meat Inspection Act of 1960 to apply to horse meat and meat-food products.   

MS - Hunting - Chapter 7. Hunting and Fishing. In General. Miss. Code Ann. § 49-7-147

This law reflects Mississippi's hunter harassment provision. Under the law, no person shall intentionally interfere with or attempt to prevent the lawful taking of wildlife by another, attempt to disturb wildlife, or attempt to affect wildlife behavior to prevent lawful taking. Further, a person may not harass another person who is engaged in the lawful taking of wildlife or in the preparation for such taking. Engaging in such conduct is a Class II violation.

MS - Hunting - § 49-7-68. Computer-assisted remote hunting Miss. Code Ann. § 49-7-68

This Mississippi law makes it a  Class I offense a person to engage in computer-assisted remote hunting. It is also unlawful for a person to provide or operate a facility for computer-assisted remote hunting if the game animal or bird being hunted is located in this state.

MS - Hunting, birds - § 49-1-39. Killing animals or birds injurious to agriculture; Miss. Code Ann. § 49-1-39; Miss. Code Ann § 49-5-7

Mississippi amended its laws in 2000 to specifically disallow the killing of any bird protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and was further amended to prohibit the killing or molestation of any wild bird (other than a game bird and some excepted species). While the law was written with an evident bias toward agricultural protection, it does specifically mention the eagle as one of the species protected under federal law.

MS - Initiatives - HCR 30, Establish the Right to Hunt, Fish and Harvest Wildlife as a Constitutional Right HCR 30 (2014) This 2014 proposed legislative referendum would establish the right to hunt and fish in the state. "Section 12A. The people have the right to hunt, fish and harvest wildlife, including by the use of traditional methods, subject only to laws and regulations that promote wildlife conservation and management and that preserve the future of hunting and fishing, as the Legislature may prescribe by general law. Public hunting and fishing shall be a preferred means of managing and controlling wildlife. This section may not be construed to modify any provision of law relating to trespass, property rights, the regulation of commercial activities or the maintenance of levees pursuant to Article 11."
MS - Leash, Impound - Chapter 19. Health, Safety, and Welfare Miss. Code Ann. § 21-19-9

This Mississippi law grants broad powers to local units of government for animal control, including the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs and penalties provided for the violation of such regulations and the expense of impounding and keeping and selling the same; to regulate and provide for the taxing of owners and harborers of dogs, and to destroy dogs running at large, unless such dogs have proper identification.

MS - Licenses - Chapter 5. Health, Safety and Public Welfare. In General Miss. Code Ann. § 19-5-50

This Mississippi statute provides that the governing authorities of any county bordering on the Gulf of Mexico and having within its boundaries two cities having in excess of forty thousand (40,000) population each and any county with a population in excess of two hundred thousand (200,000) shall have the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs.  These governing bodies are also given the authority to regulate and tax dogs generally.

MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection Miss. Code Ann. § 75-35-1 to 75-35-327

These Mississippi statutes regulate meat products, animal slaughter, inspection and branding. Animals to be slaughtered must examined and slaughtered humanely, which means being “rendered insensible to pain... before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast or cut.” Meat and meat products must be labeled “Mississippi inspected and passed.” Any violation of the provisions may result in imprisonment and/or a fine.

MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection. Miss. Code Ann. § 75-35-21

This Mississippi statute, last amended in 2006, concerns prohibited acts in the sale, transportation, and slaughter of livestock, such as cattle, pigs, and horses. This statute prohibits the sale or transportation of any animal that is adulterated or misbranded, as well as any act that causes adulteration or misbranding of any animal. This statute also prohibits any slaughter that is not considered humane.

MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection. Miss. Code Ann. § 75-35-7

This Mississippi statute, last amended in 2006, concerns the slaughter of livestock, such as cattle, pigs, and horses. The statute gives the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce in Mississippi the authority to: 1) inspect animals before slaughter to determine if any are diseased and should be slaughtered separately, and 2) inspect slaughter establishments for humane methods of slaughter.

MS - Theft - § 97-17-61. Taking of animals or vehicles Miss. Code Ann. § 97-17-61

This Mississippi statute provides that any person who takes away any livestock animal, dog, or vehicle without the consent of the owner or his or her agent, where such taking and carrying away does not amount to larceny, shall be fined, imprisoned, or both upon conviction. This statute does not apply to anyone who takes property of another believing, in good faith, that he or she has a right to do so.

MS - Trust - § 91-8-408. Trust for care of animal Miss. Code Ann. § 91-8-408 This Mississippi statute allows a trust to be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one (1) animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
MS - Veterinarian License - Chapter 39. Veterinarians. Mississippi Veterinary Practice Act. Miss. Code Ann. § 73-39-77

This Mississippi statutes provides the terms under which a veterinarian can lose his or her license to practice veterinary medicine.

MS - Veterinary - Chapter 39. Veterinarians. Miss. Code Ann. § 73-39-51 to 73-39- 95

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

MS - Wildlife, Bounty - Chapter 5. Health, Safety and Public Welfare. In General. Miss. Code Ann. § 19-5-51

This Mississippi law provides that any board of supervisors may, by appropriate resolution offer a bounty not to exceed $5.00 for each nutria, beaver or bobcat destroyed, where the board determines that nutria, beaver or bobcats are in such quantities that the preservation of trees is at issue. The The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks will  issue a $5 bounty upon the presentation of the tail of any beaver.