Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
WV - Humane Slaughter - Article 2E. Humane Slaughter of Livestock. W. Va. Code, §§ 19-2E-1 to 7

The West Virginia humane slaughter provisions apply to livestock, defined as cattle, swine, sheep or goats.  Humane methods of slaughtering livestock include those where the animal is rendered insensible to pain by a single blow, gunshot or by electrical, chemical or other means, or by slaughtering in accordance with the ritual requirements of the Jewish faith or any other religious faith that prescribes a method of slaughter by the simultaneous and instantaneous severance of the carotid arteries.  The section provides a graduating scheme of penalties for violation; a first offense results in a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of $100 - $500; a second offense results in a misdemeanor with a fine of $500 - 1,000 and  suspension of the license to do business as a slaughtering establishment until the facility is in compliance.

WV - Hunting - § 20-2-2a. Interference with hunters, trappers and fishermen W. Va. Code, § 20-2-2a

This law reflects West Virginia's hunter harassment provision. Under the law, a person may not willfully obstruct or impede the participation of any individual in the lawful activity of hunting, fishing or trapping. Violation is a misdemeanor with a fine of not less than $100 and not more than $500 or imprisonment for 10 - 100 days, or both. Subsequent violations within two years of any prior violation result in a fine of up to $1000 and imprisonment for up to one year, or both. A violator is also liable to the person for damages.

WV - Hunting - § 20-2-5a. Forfeiture by person causing injury, death or destruction of game or protected species of animal; repl W. Va. Code, § 20-2-5a

Under this statute, defendants must pay an additional monetary penalty in the form of a "replacement cost" for the unlawful killing of certain listed species ($5,000 for each bald or golden eagle killed).  If two defendants were implicated in the killing, each must pay the full penalty.  For discussion of federal Eagle Act, see Detailed Discussion .

WV - Hunting, Internet - § 20-2-5. Unlawful methods of hunting and fishing and other unlawful acts. W. Va. Code Ann. § 20-2-5

This statute prohibits unlawful hunting in the state of West Virginia. Section 29 effectively serves as the remote hunting ban. It prohibits a person from hunting or conducting hunts for a fee when the person is not physically present in the same location as the wildlife being hunted within West Virginia.

WV - Impound - § 19-20-8. Impounding and disposition of dogs; costs and fees W. Va. Code, § 19-20-8

This West Virginia statute provides that dogs seized and impounded as provided in this article shall be kept housed and fed in the county dog pound for five days after notice of seizure and impounding has been given or posted.  Upon expiration this time period, all dogs which have not previously been redeemed by their owners shall be sold or humanely destroyed (this statute outlines what constitutes "humanely destroyed").  The owner may, at any time prior to the expiration of five days retrieve his or her dog by paying the requisite fees and satisfying any other provisions.

WV - Leash - § 5A-4-4. Unlawful to kill or molest animals, birds or fowls upon grounds of capitol; powers and duties of security W. Va. Code, § 5A-4-4

This West Virginia statute aims at protecting the state capitol grounds and governor's mansion from disturbance.  In doing so, it makes it unlawful for any person to knowingly allow a dog owned by him or her to be upon the grounds of the capitol buildings or governor's mansion unless such dog is under control by leash. Any person who knowingly allows a dog owned by him to be upon the grounds of the capitol buildings or governor's mansion while not under control by leash shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, be fined not less than twenty-five nor more than one hundred dollars.  Other interesting provisions are included in this law.

WV - Licenses - § 7-7-6d. Collection of head tax on dogs; duties of assessor and sheriff; registration of dogs; disposition of h W. Va. Code, § 7-7-6d This West Virginia statute provides that it is the duty of the county assessor at the time of assessment of the personal property within such county, to assess and collect a head tax of one dollar on each male or spayed female dog and of two dollars on each unspayed female dog.  In addition to the above, the assessor and his deputies shall have the further duty of collecting any such head tax on dogs as may be levied by the ordinances of each and every municipality within the county.  The tax also serves the function of providing a registration for the dog.  Any person who refuses to pay the tax after a specified period may have his or her dog seized, which may then be sold or eventually destroyed.
WV - Lien - § 38-11-4. Lien of bailee of animals or vehicles W. Va. Code, § 38-11-4

This West Virginia law (as it relates to animals) states the a person who keeps a livery stable, or boarding stable for animals, or one who boards, pastures, feeds or trains animals for hire, has a lien upon such animals for the sum due him for the care, boarding, pasturage, feeding, or training of such animals, or the care, keeping of such animals. This lien exists even though such animals are permitted to be taken out of the possession of the one claiming such lien even if the contract has not yet terminated for the lien. The purchaser of such an animal, while out of the possession of the person claiming the lien, can take the property free of the lien unless he or she had actual notice of the lien at the time of purchase.

WV - Ordinances - § 19-20A-8. Vaccinated dogs and cats may run at large; confinement may be required by the commissioner of agri W. Va. Code, § 19-20A-8 This West Virginia statute provides that dogs or cats vaccinated in compliance with the provisions of this article may run at large in any area or locality unless a county commission or a municipality has adopted and enforced ordinances to prevent dogs from running at large.  The state commissioner of agriculture may also enforce an at large ban when a rabies quarantine is in effect.  However, any county commission or municipality may not adopt any ordinance which purports to keep any vaccinated dog from running at large while engaged in any lawful hunting activity; from running at large while engaged in any lawful training activity; or from running at large while engaged in any lawful herding or other farm related activity.
WV - Pet Trust - § 44D-4-408. Trust for care of animal W. Va. Code, § 44D-1-110; W. Va. Code, § 44D-4-408; W. Va. Code, § 44D-4-409

These West Virginia statutes regulate trusts for the care of animals. A pet trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the grantor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal. Property of a trust may be applied only to its intended use. A trust may be enforced by a person appointed in the terms of the trust instrument or by a person appointed by the court.

WV - Scientific research - § 20-2-50. Permit to hunt, kill, etc., wildlife for scientific or propagation purposes W. Va. Code, § 20-2-50

Under this West Virginia law, the director may issue a permit to a person to hunt, kill, take, capture or maintain in captivity wildlife exclusively for scientific purposes, but not for any commercial purposes.

WV - Veterinary - Article 10. Veterinarians. W. Va. Code, § 30-10-1 to 23

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

WY - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws W.S.1977 § 35-13-201 to 206; § 31-5-611

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

WY - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes W. S. 1977 § 6-3-203

Wyoming amended its cruelty law in early 2011 to include the new offense of "household pet animal cruelty." Under the general anti-cruelty part of the law, a person commits cruelty to animals if he or she  knowingly and with intent to cause death, injury or undue suffering overrides an animal or drives an animal when overloaded, unnecessarily or cruelly beats, tortures, torments, injures, mutilates or attempts to kill an animal, or carries an animal in a manner that poses undue risk of injury or death.  The neglect component provides that person who has charge and custody of any animal and unnecessarily fails to provide it with the proper food, drink or protection from the weather, or cruelly abandons the animal, or fails to provide the animal with appropriate medical care is also guilty of cruelty.

WY - Cruelty, livestock - Chapter 29. Protection of Livestock Animals. W. S. 1977 §§ 11-29-101 to 115

This chapter concerns cruelty to livestock animals. The laws state that every person who confines or causes to be confined any livestock animal under the laws of this state, must supply to the livestock animal during confinement a sufficient quantity of wholesome food and water. The section also provides that officers and agents of the Wyoming livestock board must be provided with a certificate and badge. Any peace officer, agent or officer of the board may lawfully interfere to prevent the perpetration of any act of cruelty upon any livestock animal in his or her presence.

WY - Dangerous - Article 1. In General. (Dangerous Dog Provisions) W. S. 1977 § 11-31-105 to 108

This Wyoming statute provides that every person, firm, copartnership, corporation or company owning any dog, which to his knowledge has killed sheep or other livestock, shall exterminate and destroy the dog.

WY - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws W. S. 1977 § 6-5-211; § 11-31-101 - 108; § 11-31-201 - 214; § 11-31-301; § 15-1-103; § 23-3-109; § 33-30-215

These Wyoming statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include damage done to livestock by dogs, rabies vaccination requirements, and municipal powers to regulate dogs.

WY - Eagles - § 23-3-101. Taking eagle prohibited W.S.1977 § 23-3-101

This Wyoming statutes prohibits the taking of an eagle unless the taking is authorized by federal law. Such a taking constitutes a high misdemeanor.

WY - Ecoterrorism - § 6-3-414. Trespassing to Unlawfully Collect Resource Data W. S. 1977 § 6-3-414 This statute prohibits trespassing to unlawfully collect resource data. Collecting resource data is done by entering onto open land without an ownership interest or permission to collect information or photograph resource data (including animal species). Violation of this law is punishable by imprisonment of not more than one year and/or a $1,000 fine for the first offense, and imprisonment from ten days to a year and/or a $5,000 fine for subsequent offenses.
WY - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 1. General Provisions as to Civil Actions W.S.1977 § 1-1-122 to 123

The Wyoming equine liability provisions immunize equine professionals by declaring that those who engage in equine activities or any recreational activities assume the inherent risks in the sport or recreational opportunity.  However, actions based upon negligence of the provider wherein the damage, injury or death is not the result of an inherent risk of the sport or recreational opportunity shall be preserved pursuant to W.S. 1-1-109.

WY - Feral animals - Chapter 48. Feral Livestock W. S. 1977 § 11-48-101 to 102

This Wyoming chapter deals with feral livestock. Under the chapter, "feral” means a domestic animal that is not under the control of nor cared for by a person and which has returned to a wild or semi-wild state. Before livestock can be declared feral, an attempt must be made to locate the owner. If the owner cannot be located, the director of the Wyoming livestock board or state veterinarian can then capture or dispose of any feral livestock damaging public or private property, and destroy any feral livestock thought to be infected with disease. The owner of feral livestock is responsible for costs associated with this chapter for damage or care of the feral livestock.

WY - Fur - Article 3. Miscellaneous Fees; Taxidermists; Trapping; Fur Dealers. W. S. 1977 §§ 23-2-301 to 307

This set of Wyoming laws sets forth the requirements and costs to obtain trapping and taxidermist licenses. Any trap or snare found in the field not bearing the name and address of the owner of the trap or snare or the identification number assigned by the department to the owner of the trap or snare may be confiscated by any employee of the department. Any landowner or his agent may inspect any trap or snare set on his property, may remove the trap or snare and may release or remove from the trap or snare any wildlife which has not been taken lawfully. However, it is a "low misdemeanor" to tamper with or remove any trap or snare set or maintained in compliance with this act or release a furbearer or predator found in a legal trap.

WY - Grizzly Bear - Article 10. Grizzly Bear Relocation W. S. 1977 § 23-1-1001

This Wyoming statute requires that, when a grizzly bear is relocated, that the department must notify the sheriff and issue a press release to the media and sheriff.  The press release must provide the date and location of the relocation, and the number of bears to be relocated.

WY - Horses - § 11-30-115. Unlawful killing of wild horses W. S. 1977 § 11-30-115

This Wyoming statute provides that it is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of $750 with possible imprisonment of up to six months to maliciously kill a "wild horse" (one that is unbranded and unclaimed and lives on state or public land).  This was signed into law in March of 2001.

WY - Hunting - Article 4. Miscellaneous Acts Prohibited (hunter harassment) W. S. 1977 §§ 23-3-401 to 407

This section of Wyoming laws relates to miscellaneous prohibited hunting acts. Included is the state's hunter harassment law, which provides that no person shall with the intent to prevent or hinder the lawful taking of any wildlife. Violation is a "low misdemeanor." Article 4 also includes a 2009 law that prohibits remote hunting that allows a person not physically present to remotely control a weapon to kill wildlife.

WY - Hunting - Article 1. Game Bird Farms. W.S.1977 §§ 23-5-101 - 110

This Wyoming statute provides that one who desires to operate a game bird farm must file a verified declaration that states the purpose of the farm (breeding, propagating, or hunting) and a legal description of the tract of land.

WY - Hunting - § 23-3-304. Certain trapping devices unlawful; game for bait prohibited; baiting big game animals prohibited; pen W. S. 1977 § 23-3-304

This Wyoming statute prohibits certain trapping devices, such as pit, pitfall, net, trap, deadfall, poison, etc. It is illegal to take or use a game animal to bait a trap or to poison any wildlife. A violation is a high misdemeanor.

WY - Impound - § 33-30-215. Disposition of unclaimed animals in custody of veterinarians; notice to owner; liability of veterina W. S. 1977 § 33-30-215

This Wyoming statute states that any animal placed in the custody of a licensed veterinarian for treatment, boarding, or other care, which is then unclaimed by its owner for a period of more than ten days after written notice is given to the owner at his or her last known address, shall be deemed to be abandoned.  It may then be turned over to the nearest humane society or dog pound in the area where it may be disposed of as the shelter sees fit.

WY - Initiative - Right to Hunt, Fish and Trap, Amendment B Amendment B (2012) The adoption of this amendment will recognize and preserve the heritage of Wyoming citizens' opportunity to fish, hunt and trap wildlife, subject to regulation as prescribed by law. It was passed by 84.8% of voters in 2012.
WY - Invasive Species - Article 2. Aquatic Invasive Species W. S. 1977 §§ 23-4-201 to 206

These Wyoming statutes prohibit introducing an aquatic invasive species into any waters of the state. No one may launch any conveyance without first complying with aquatic invasive species prevention requirements. A violation is a high misdemeanor.

WY - Livestock - Chapter 30. Offenses Concerning Livestock and Other Animals. W. S. 1977 § 11-30-101 to 115

This Wyoming chapter of laws covers such offenses from misbranding livestock to a prohibition on the desertion and abandonment of sheep. Specific horse offenses are detailed, such as taking possession of any horse or mule found running at large on the open range with the intent of working or riding it, and the use of horses by a stable keeper without consent of the owner. The chapter also makes it a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of not more than $750 and/or imprisonment for up to 6 months for willfully or maliciously killing a wild horse.

WY - Ordinances - § 11-31-301. Public nuisance; notice; penalties; rules and regulations; animal control districts and officers W. S. 1977 § 11-31-301

This Wyoming statute provides that a board of county commissioners may declare the running at large of any specified animals in unincorporated areas within the county limits a public nuisance.  Dogs or other animals, whose ownership cannot be determined, may be destroyed.  A dog injuring or killing livestock may be killed by the owner of the livestock or his agent or any peace officer.  However, any dog attacking any person in a vicious manner may be impounded by the county sheriff or animal control officer and held in quarantine for at least fifteen (15) days and not more than twenty (20) days after the attack to determine whether the dog has any disease which may be communicated to humans.  A board of county commissioners may enact regulations relative to dogs running at large, vicious dogs, dogs running wild game or livestock or acts by other animals which shall carry out the purposes of this section.  The county may also establish a county license fee and an animal control program/facility.

WY - Ordinances - § 15-1-103. General powers of governing bodies W.S. 1977 § 15.1-3

This Wyoming statute provides that the governing bodies of all cities and towns may regulate or prohibit the running at large within the city limits of any animals, impose a license fee for the keeping or harboring of dogs and establish and provide for the operation of a pound.  They may also abate nuisances (dogs at large are defined as such), establish quarantines, and enact other ordinances for the general health, safety, and welfare of the community.

WY - Predatory Animals - Chapter 6. Predatory Animals. W. S. 1977 § 11-6-101 - 313

This first article of the chapter allows owners of livestock to fill out an application with the board of county commissioners to receive permission to eradicate predatory animals. The second article of the chapter outlines the composition and function of the state predator management advisory board. Article 3 outlines the Wyoming animal damage management program. In that section, "predatory animal” is defined as any coyote, jackrabbit, porcupine, raccoon, red fox, skunk or stray cat; and gray wolves except where they are designated as trophy game animals.

WY - Trust - § 4-10-409. Trust for care of animal W. S. 1977 § 4-10-409

This statute represents Wyoming's pet trust law.  The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the last animal named in the trust.

WY - Veterinary - Chapter 30. Veterinarians W. S. 1977 §§ 33-30-201 to 225

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

WY - Wildlife, exotic hybrid - Chapter 1. Game and Fish Administration. W. S. 1977 §§ 23-1-101 to 109

This section of Wyoming statutes states that all wildlife in the state is considered the property of the state.  It further provides that there is no private ownership of live animals classified in this act as big or trophy game animals. “Exotic species” means any wild animals, including amphibians, reptiles, mollusks, crustaceans or birds not found in a wild, free or unconfined status in Wyoming. This section also contains the management laws for delisted gray wolves that were repealed in 2012.

ZW - Cruelty - Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act Title 19, Chapter 19:09

This law constitutes Zimbabwe's cruelty to animals act. Under the act, “animal” means: (a) any kind of domestic vertebrate animal; (b) any kind of wild vertebrate animal in captivity; (c) the young of any animal referred to above. The law prohibits the cruel beating, kicking, overriding, overdriving, overloading, or torturing of animals, among other things. Section 4 requires “knackers” (any person whose trade or business it is to kill any horse, mule, ass, bovine, sheep, goat or pig, the meat of which is primarily intended for animals) to comply with regulations. Section 5 deals with the control of pet shops and other places where animals are kept in captivity for trading purposes.

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