Dangerous Dog: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
OK - Ordinances - § 43. Counties over 200,000 population--Regulation and control of dogs running at large--Penalties 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 43 This Oklahoma statute provides that the board of county commissioners of any county with a population of two hundred thousand (200,000) or more may regulate or prohibit the running at large of dogs and may impound and dispose of such dogs. The board of county commissioners may also regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and authorize the humane killing or disposal of dogs, found at large, contrary to any ordinance regulating the same. Any person, firm or corporation who violates any rule or regulation made by such board of county commissioners under the authority of this act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished as provided by the laws of this state.
OK - Dog bite - Oklahoma Dog Bite Laws 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 41 - 47

These statutes comprise Oklahoma's Dangerous Dog Laws.  The state imposes strict liability for dog bites; "the owner or owners of any dog shall be liable for damages to the full amount of any damages sustained when his dog, without provocation, bites or injures any person while such person is in or on a place where he has a lawful right to be."  Further, any person may lawfully kill a dog who is chasing that person's livestock.  An owner of a dog that has been adjudged "dangerous" must register the dog, enclose the dog except when out on a leash with muzzle, and post $50,000 in liability insurance.  An owner who does not follow the provisions not only faces the confiscation of his or her dog, but may also be subject to a one-year misdemeanor.

OK - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws 11 Okl.St.Ann. § 22-115.1; 21 Okl.St.Ann. § 649.1 and 649.2; 21 Okl. St. Ann. § 1717 - 1718; 4 Okl.St.Ann. § 41 - 47; 391 - 402; 499 - 499.10; 501 - 602; 29 Okl. St. Ann. § 7-304; 70 Okl.St.Ann. § 5-117.6

These statutes comprise Oklahoma's dog laws.  Among the provisions include dog control laws, sterilization provisions for adopted animals, and the use of unclaimed animals in scientific research or experimentation.

OK - Dangerous dog - § 44. Definitions 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 44

This Oklahoma statute provides the definitions related to dangerous dog laws in the state, including dangerous dog, potentially dangerous dog, severe injury, and owner, among others.

OK - Dangerous - § 717. Owner of mischievous animal which kills person 21 Okl. St. Ann. § 717

This Oklahoma law states that an owner of a "mischievous animal" who knowing its propensities allows it to go at large or does not exercise ordinary care in keeping it, will be guilty of manslaughter in the second degree if while at large it kills a human.

OH - Dog - Chapter 955. Dogs (Consolidated dog laws) RC §§ 955.01 - 99; § 9.62; § 1533.19 - 221

This is the Ohio statute that regulates dogs in general, outlining rules and regulations for dog owners. The state leash requirement appears limited to rabies quarantines (Sec. 955.26).  It also gives the definition of  what is considered a dangerous or vicious dog, the rules and regulations for owners of these dogs, and penalization for breaking these rules.

NY - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 106 - 127, 331 - 332, 400 - 410; McKinney's ECL §§ 11-0529, 11-0901 - 0928, 11-2117; McKinney's General Business Law §§ 399-aa, 751 - 755; McKinney's General Municipal Law § 88, 209-cc;

These New York statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include state licensing requirements, the sale of dogs by pet dealers, rabies control laws, and provisions related to dogs and hunting.

NY - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 123, 123-a

This New York statute provides that statutory penalties for dog bites and the process for declaring a dog "dangerous."  Any person who witnesses an attack or threatened attack, or in the case of a minor, an adult acting on behalf of such minor, may make a complaint of an attack or threatened attack upon a person, companion animal, farm animal, or a domestic animal to a dog control officer or police officer of the appropriate municipality. Such officer shall immediately inform the complainant of his or her right to commence a proceeding as provided in subdivision two of this section and, if there is reason to believe the dog is a dangerous dog, the officer shall forthwith commence such proceeding himself or herself. Upon a finding that a dog is dangerous, the judge or justice may order humane euthanasia or permanent confinement of the dog if one listed aggravating circumstances is established at the judicial hearing.

NY - Dangerous animal - § 209-cc. Notification of presence of wild animals and dangerous dogs McKinney's General Municipal Law § 209-cc

New York state law requires anyone in possession of dangerous dogs and dangerous wild animals (which include non-human primates, non-domesticated dogs and cats, bears, venomous, constrictors and python snakes, and certain crocodiles) to report the presence of that animal to the clerk of the city, town, or village in which the animal resides. The report must be filed by April 1st every year and must list all of the physical locations where the animal may be kept. The clerk must then notify all local police, fire, and emergency medical service departments of the presence of that animal. Any person who fails to report the presence may be fined up to $250 dollars for the first offense and $1,000 dollars for each subsequent offense. Zoos and other U.S. Department of Agriculture-licensed exhibitors are exempt from the reporting requirement.

NV - Dog Ordinance - 244.359. Ordinance concerning control of animals N. R. S. 244.359

This Nevada statute provides that each board of county commissioners may enact and enforce an ordinance related to dogs including licensing, regulating or prohibiting the running at large and disposal of all kinds of animals, establishing a pound, designating an animal as inherently dangerous and requiring the owner of such an animal to obtain a policy of liability insurance, among other things.

NV - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws N. R. S. 193.021; N. R. S. 202.500; N. R. S. 206.150; N. R. S. 244.359; N. R. S. 269.225; N. R. S. 503.631; N. R. S. 568.370; N.R.S. 574.600 - 670; N.R.S. 575.020

These statutes comprise Nevada's dog laws.  Among the provisions include a link to proper care requirements for companion animals, animal control ordinance provisions, and the dangerous dog law among others.

NV - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 202. Crimes Against Public Health and Safety. N. R. S. 202.500

This Nevada statute defines a "dangerous dog," as a dog, that without provocation, on two separate occasions within 18 months, behaved menacingly to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend him or herself against substantial bodily harm, when the dog is either off the premises of its owner or keeper or not confined in a cage or pen.  A dog then becomes "vicious" when, without being provoked, it killed or inflicted substantial bodily harm upon a human being.  If substantial bodily harm results from an attack by a dog known to be vicious, its owner or keeper is guilty of a category D felony.  Under the statute, a dog may not be declared dangerous if it attacks as a defensive act against a person who was committing or attempting to commit a crime or who provoked the dog.

NM - Dog Bite - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-6

This short New Mexico statute provides that state health department shall prescribe regulations for the reporting of animal bites, confinement and disposition of rabies-suspect animals, rabies quarantine and the disposition of dogs and cats exposed to rabies, in the interest of public health and safety.

NM - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws NMSA 1978, § 3-18-3; § 77-1-1 - 20; § 77-1A-1 - 6; § 77-1B-1 - 12; § 25-1-15

These statutes comprise New Mexico's dog laws.  Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, vaccination requirements, and provisions related to dangerous dogs.

NM - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-10

This New Mexico statute provides that it is unlawful for any person to keep any animal known to be vicious and liable to attack or injure human beings unless such animal is securely kept to prevent injury to any person.  It is also unlawful to keep any unvaccinated dog or cat or any animal with any symptom of rabies or to fail or to refuse to destroy vicious animals or unvaccinated dogs or cats with symptoms of rabies.

NJ - Ordinances - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-36

This New Jersey statute provides that the provisions of the dangerous dog act shall supersede any law, ordinance, or regulation concerning vicious or potentially dangerous dogs, any specific breed of dog, or any other type of dog inconsistent with this act enacted by any municipality, county, or county or local board of health.

NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJSA 4:19-9

This New Jersey statute provides that a person may humanely destroy a dog in self defense, or which is found chasing, worrying, wounding or destroying any sheep, lamb, poultry or domestic animal.

NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-26

This New Jersey statute provides that, if a dog is declared vicious or potentially dangerous, the owner of the dog shall be liable to the municipality in which the dog is impounded for the costs and expenses of impounding and destroying the dog. The municipality may establish by ordinance a schedule of these costs and expenses.

NJ - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N. J. S. A. 2A:42-101 to 2A:42-113; 2C:29-3.1; 4:19-1 to 4:19-43; 4:19A-1 - 17; 4:21B-1 - 3; 4:22A-1 to 13; 23:4-25, 26, 46; 26:4-78 - 95; 40:48-1; 54:4-83

These statutes comprise New Jersey's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws regarding domesticated animals in housing projects, rabies control laws, licensing requirements, and dangerous dog laws.

NJ - Dog - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJSA 4:19-15.1 to 4:19-15.33 These New Jersey statutes comprise the laws for licensing, impounding, appointment of animal control officers, and kennel/pet shop regulations. It also includes a provision that prohibits impounded animals from being sold or donated for experimentation, as well as pet sterilization provisions.
NJ - Dog Bite - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by N. J. S. A. 4:19-16

This New Jersey statute provides that the owner of any dog that bites a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.

NH - Exotic Pets - Chapter 466-A. Wolf Hybrids N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466-A:1 to 466-A:6

This section of laws comprises New Hampshire's wolf-dog hybrid act. Under the law, no person shall sell or resell, offer for sale or resale, or release or cause to be released a wolf hybrid in the state of New Hampshire. A person may temporarily import a wolf hybrid provided that he or she shows proof of spaying or neutering and has accurate vaccination records. Each wolf hybrid shall be under the physical control of the owner or confined in an enclosure or structure sufficient to prohibit escape. Any person in violation of this chapter or any rule adopted under this chapter shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor. (See also link to 207:14 Import, Possession, or Release of Wildlife ).

NH - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 3:25; § 4:13-s; § 466:1 - 466:54; 47:17; 207:11 - 207:13b; 210:18; 264:31; 436:99 - 436:109; 437:1 - 437:22; 437-A:1 - 9; 508:18-a; § 644:8-f

These New Hampshire statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, dangerous dog laws, and the rabies control code.

NH - Dog Bite - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:31 to 31-a

Under this section, a dog is considered to be a nuisance, a menace, or vicious to persons or to property if it is "at large," if it barks for sustained periods, if it chases cars continuously, or if it growls, snaps at or bites persons.  If a dog bites a person and breaks the skin, the animal control officer must inform the victim whether the dog was vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours.

NE - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws Neb. Rev. St § 14-102; § 15-218 - 220; § 16-206; 16-235; § 17-526, 17-547; § 25-21,236; § 37-525; § 37-705; § 54-601 - 616; § 54-617 - 624; § 54-625 - 650; § 71-4401 - 4412

These Nebraska statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include the municipal authority to regulate dogs at large and licensing, rabies control, and dangerous dog laws.  The set of laws relating to commercial pet dealers and breeders is also provided.

NE - Dangerous - ARTICLE 6. DOGS AND CATS. (B) DANGEROUS DOGS. Neb. Rev. St. § 54-617 to 54-624

These Nebraska statutes outline the state's dangerous dog laws.  Among the provisions include a requirement that the dog must be restrained when not in a secure enclosure on the owner's property.  There is also a requirement that owners must post warning signs on the property notifying people that a dangerous dog is present.  If a dangerous dog bites a person, the owner can be found guilty of a Class IV misdemeanor and the dog will be destroyed. 

ND - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws NDCC 11-11-14; 20.1-04-12 - 12.2; 20.1-05-02.1; 23-36-01 - 09; 36-21-10 - 11; 40-05-01 -2; 40-05-19; 42-03-01 - 04; 43-29-16.1; 12.1-17-09

These statutes comprise North Dakota's dog laws.  Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, rabies, control laws, provisions that define dogs as a public nuisance, and laws concerning dogs that harass big game or livestock.

NC - Ordinances - § 67-4.5. Local ordinances N.C.G.S.A. § 67-4.5

This North Carolina statute provides that nothing in the dangerous dog laws shall be construed to prevent a city or county from adopting or enforcing its own program for control of dangerous dogs.

NC - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N.C.G.S.A. § 14-81 to 82; N.C.G.S.A. § 14-401.17; § 19A-20 to 44; § 19A-60 to 69; § 67-1 - 36; § 90-187.7; § 113-291.5; § 130A-184 to 204; § 145-13; § 160A-186; § 160A-212

These North Carolina statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include pet shop provisions, rabies vaccination laws, and the dangerous dog chapter.

NC - Dangerous Dogs - Chapter 67. Dogs N.C.G.S.A. § 67-14.1

This North Carolina statute provides that any dog which trails, runs, injures or kills any deer or bear on any wildlife refuge, sanctuary or management area designated by the Wildlife Resources Commission, during the closed season for hunting with dogs on such refuge or management area, is hereby declared to be a public nuisance, and any wildlife protector may destroy it by humane method.  Any unmuzzled dog running at large in such area shall be impounded and notice shall be published in some newspaper published in the county for two successive weeks.  If no owner comes to claim the dog, it may be destroyed within 15 days after publication.

NC - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 67. Dogs. Article 1A. Dangerous Dogs. N.C.G.S.A. § 67-1 to 18; N.C.G.S.A. § 130A-196, 130A-200

These North Carolina statutes comprise the state's dangerous dog and dog bite laws.  Among the provisions include misdemeanor penalties for an owner if a dangerous dog attacks a person and causes physical injuries requiring medical treatment in excess of one hundred dollars ($100.00) and strict liability in civil damages for any injuries or property damage the dog inflicts upon a person, his property, or another animal.  Another statute provides that any person brought to receive medical treatment for a dog bite must report it to the local health director and the animal must be confined for a ten day observation period.

MT - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws MCA 7-23-101 to 7-23-105; 7-23-2108 to 7-23-4104; 7-23-4201 to 7-23-4203; 27-1-715; 81-7-401 to 81-7-403; 87-2-521; 87-6-404; 87-4-915

These Montana statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include strict liability for all dog bites, authority for counties to enact ordinances regarding dangerous dogs, barking dogs, and destruction of unlicensed dogs, as well as general laws related to registration and licensing.

MT - Dangerous - CHAPTER 23. DOMESTIC ANIMAL CONTROL AND PROTECTION. MCA 7-23-2109

This Montana statute provides that the county governing body may regulate, restrain, control, kill, or quarantine any vicious dog, whether such dog is licensed or unlicensed, by the adoption of an ordinance which substantially complies with state dangerous dog laws.

MT - Bite - Chapter 1. Availability of Remedies--Liability. MCA 27-1-715

This Montana statute provides that the owner of any dog which shall without provocation bite any person while such person is on or in a public place or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of such dog, located within an incorporated city or town shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.

MS - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Miss. Code Ann. § 19-5-50; § 19-25-83; § 19-5-3; § 21-19-9; § 21-21-5; § 37-7-342; § 41-53-1 - 13; § 45-3-52; § 49-7-42; § 69-29-2; § 73-39-89; § 95-5-19 - 21

These Mississippi statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions relating to hunting with dogs, local dog ordinances, and liability of owners for damage done by dogs.

MS - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 3. Crimes Against the Person. Miss. Code Ann. § 97-3-45

This Mississippi law makes an owner liable for manslaughter if he or she wilfully allows a mischievous animal to go at large, or it goes at large because the owner fails to exercise ordinary care, and the animal, while at large or not confined, kills any human being who took reasonable precautions to avoid the animal.

MO - Rabies - Chapter 322. Protection Against Rabies V. A. M. S. 322.090 - 322.145

This chapter concerns laws preventing the transmission and control of rabies and other zoonotic diseases. Section 322.140 provides that if a county does not adopt rules and regulations pursuant to sections 322.090 to 322.130, whenever an animal bites or otherwise possibly transmits rabies or any zoonotic disease, the incident shall be immediately reported to the county health department. It also provides that the owner of an owner that bites is responsible for the costs associated with rabies testing and/or treatment. Further, the owner of an animal that bites or otherwise possibly transmitted rabies or any zoonotic disease shall be liable to an injured party for all damages done by the animal.

MO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws V. A. M. S. 273.010 - 405; 77.510; 80.090; 322.010 - 080; 10.112 - 113

These Missouri statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws for impounding loose dogs, licensing, rabies control, and the Animal Care Facilities Act, which regulates commercial breeders/pet shops.

MN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws M. S. A. 35.67 - 71; 97A.321, 97B.001 - 621; 135A.191; 325F.79-792; 346.01-58; 347.01-56; 365.10; 366.01; § 609.226

These statutes comprise Minnesota's relevant dog laws.  Among the provisions include several laws related to natural resources protection and hunting with dogs, the sale of dogs, and laws related to damage done by dogs.

MN - Dangerous - Minnesota Dangerous Dog Definitions, Dog Bites, & Rabies Treatments M. S. A. § 35.67 - 35.69; M.S.A. § 346.51; M.S.A. § 347.50

This Minnesota set of laws outlines the procedure for a town establishing a rabies proclamation and prevents the running at large of unmuzzled dogs in such localities.  It also provides that an owner or custodian of a dog which does not have an appropriate antirabies vaccination and which bites or otherwise exposes a person to rabies virus may be penalized under section 346.53.  The statute also defines "dangerous dog" and "potentially dangerous dog." 

MI - Exotic Pets - Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Wolf-dog Cross Act MCLA 287.1001 - 1023

This Michigan law bans acquisition and possession of wolf-dog hybrids, though it “grandfathered” animals already owned as pets at the time of the law's enactments. In order to maintain public safety and animal welfare, the state created a strict permit system for those owners who were allowed to keep their already-existing pets. (See also link to Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Large Carnivore Act ; link to 287.731- Importation of species having potential to endanger life or property prohibited; importation of wild or exotic animals; requirements and prohibitions ).

MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT. M. C. L. A. 287.1004

This Michigan statute provides the requirements for ownership of wolf-dog hybrids in the state.

MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT. M. C. L. A. 287.1021

Under this Michigan statute, a local unit is empowered to adopt an ordinance governing wolf-dog crosses that is more restrictive than this act, provided it fulfills the  requirements of this act in addition to any other requirements governing a wolf-dog cross under state and federal law.

MI - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws M.C.L. 287.261 - 395; 317.63; 324.73101 - 42106

The regulation of dogs and cats in Michigan implicates three major issues: licensing and registration of dogs; the regulation of animal control facilities and pet shops; and the ever-present concern of dog bites.  The primary statutory vehicle that regulates the licensing requirements for dogs is the The Dog Law of 1919. Under the dog law, it is unlawful for any person to own a dog six months or older unless the dog is licensed. MCL § 287.262. It is also unlawful for a person to own a dog six months or older that does not wear a collar and tag at all times, except when engaged in hunting activities accompanied by his or her owner. MCL § 287.262. A female dog that is in heat may not go beyond her owner’s premises unless properly held on a leash under this section.

MI - Dog Bite - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M. C. L. A. 750.66a

This Michigan law, which became effective January of 2009, provides that a person 18 years of age or older who is responsible for controlling the actions of a dog or wolf-dog cross and the person knows or has reason to know that the dog or wolf-dog cross has bitten another person shall remain on the scene. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.

MI - Dangerous - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Dangerous Animals. M. C. L. A. 287.321 - 323

This Michigan statute defines "dangerous animal," which means a dog or other animal that bites or attacks a person, or a dog that bites or attacks and causes serious injury or death to another dog while the other dog is on the property or under the control of its owner.  However, a dangerous animal does not include any of the following:  an animal that bites or attacks a person who is knowingly trespassing on the property of the animal's owner; an animal that bites or attacks a person who provokes or torments the animal; or an animal that is responding in a manner that an ordinary and reasonable person would conclude was designed to protect a person if that person is engaged in a lawful activity or is the subject of an assault.

ME - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws 7 M.R.S.A.§ 3901 - 4163; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11111; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11228; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11302; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11951; 12 M.R.S.A. § 12051 - 12055; 12 M.R.S.A. § 12404; § 12707; 17-A M.R.S.A. § 752-B; 17 M.R.S.A. § 1044;

These Maine statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws that determine the disposition of loose or dangerous dogs, and a chapter on the sale of dogs.

ME - Dog, Dangerous - Maine Dangerous Dog Laws 7 M. R. S. A. § 3951 - 3953; 7 M. R. S. A. § 3961 - 3964; 7 M. R. S. A. § 3907

This Maine statutory sections outlines the state's dangerous dog laws.  It first provides that any person may lawfully kill a dog if necessary to protect that person, another person or a domesticated animal during the course of a sudden, unprovoked assault.  A person who owns or keeps a dangerous dog commits a civil violation for which the court shall adjudge a fine of not less than $250 and not more than $1,000.  The dog may be ordered to be muzzled, or euthanized if it has killed, maimed or inflicted serious bodily injury upon a person or has a history of a prior assault.  Notably, if a dog whose owner refuses or neglects to comply with the order wounds any person by a sudden assault or wounds or kills any domestic animal, the owner shall pay the person injured treble damages and costs to be recovered by a civil action.  The statute sets out the specific procedure for declaring a dog dangerous and the statutory definition of dangerous is also provided by reference to a companion statute.

MD - Ordinances - Article 24. Political Subdivisions--Miscellaneous Provisions. MD Code, Local Government, § 13-117; MD Code, Local Government, § 13-118; MD Code, Local Government, § 13-121 These Maryland statutory sections apply to Carroll, Cecil, and Frederick Counties. The laws provide that the county commissioners, by ordinance, may provide for a comprehensive system for the regulation of domestic animals, including dogs, and wild animals held in captivity, within the county, including licensing and control. Also included are provisions for the impoundment and disposal of unlicensed or dangerous dogs and provisions for the regulation of persons who own or keep any animal which disturbs the peace.
MD - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws MD Code, Local Government, § 13-101 - 134; MD Code, Transportation, § 21-1004.1; MD Code, Natural Resources, § 10-413, 416, 701, 703, and 807; MD Code, Public Safety, § 2-313; MD Code, Health - General, § 18-312 - 321; MD Code, General Provisions, § 7-304

These statutes comprise Maryland's dog laws.  Maryland is unique in that the state law governs the specific licensing and other regulations certain counties may adopt or enforce.  Also included are the state rabies provisions and even the law that designates the state dog (the Chesapeake Bay retriever).

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