Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
Sweden - Scientific Research - Swedish Animal Welfare Ordinance SFS 1988:539

This is one of two main pieces of animal welfare legislation in Sweden. It has been edited to contain mostly material relating to animal research.

Sweden - Cruelty - The Sweden Animal Welfare Act SFS 1998:56

The Swedish Animal Welfare Act applies to the care and treatment of domestic animals, and other animals if they are kept in captivity or are used for any of the purposes referred to in section 19 (generally, scientific uses).  It provides that animals shall be treated well and shall be protected from unnecessary suffering and disease, among other things.

Supreme Decree 011-84-AG, 1984 - Peru 011-84-AG This law deems it necessary to promote the breeding of fighting cattle as a national interest.
Supreme Decree 004-2019-MC, 2019 - Peru Supreme Decree 004-2019-MC, 2019 - Peru

This law aims to regulate the criteria for evaluating whether a public event can be considered, or “qualifies,” as a non-sporting cultural event. Such events that may fall into this category include, but are not limited to, opera, ballet, theatre, and circus.

Supreme Decree 004, 2014 - Peru Supreme Decree 004, 2014 - Peru This law approves an updated list of categorization and classification of legally protected endangered species of wild animals into the following categories; critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, near threatened, and data deficient. It describes the regulations and prohibitions regarding activities related to endangered species, as well as regulations relating to the export of such animals for cultural or scientific purposes.
Supreme Decree 001-2017-MIMP, 2017 - Peru 001-2017-MIMP This law aims to further regulate and promote the use of guide dogs for the visually impaired, including veterinary care for the dogs, certification and registration of their guide dog status, training, and conditions of use.
Sri Lanka - Cruelty - Chapter 573 Cruelty to Animals (English) Ordinances Nos 13 of 1907, 19 of 1912, 43 of 1917, Y of 1919, 33 of 1921, 16 of 1927, 17 of 1970, 12 of 1945, 22 of 1955 This Ordinance, in English, details Sri Lanka's animal cruelty laws. It also provides provisions for starving animals, using disabled or ill animals for labor, killing animals with unnecessary cruelty, and permitting diseased animals to die in the street. This ordinance also gives the Minister the power to appoint infirmaries to treat and care for animals that are the victims of offenses committed under this ordinance; the owner of the animal is liable for the cost of caring for the infirmed animal. Any Magistrate, Superintendent, or Assistant Superintendent of Police, Judge of primary Court or the divisional Assistant Government Agent of a division may direct the immediate destruction of an animal who was a victim of an offense if in that person's opinion the animal's sufferings are such as to render such a direction proper. Offenders shall be fined or jailed depending on the seriousness of the offence.
South Africa - Protected Areas Act - National Environmental Management No. 57 of 2003: National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act, 2003. This act is to provide for the protection and conservation of ecologically viable areas representative of South Africa’s biological diversity and its natural landscapes and seascapes; for the establishment of a national register of all national, provincial and local protected areas; for the management of those areas in accordance with national norms and standards; for intergovernmental co-operation and public consultation in matters concerning protected areas; and for matters in connection therewith.
South Africa - Endangered Species - List of Endangered Species This is the published list of all the critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable and protected species under South Africa's National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004).
South Africa - Cruelty - Animal Protection NO. 71 OF 1962; ACT NO 24 OF 1935; NO. R. 468 1986; Acts relating to the prevention of cruelty to animals. Contains: Animal Protection Act - page 1 Performing Animal Protection Act (including guard dogs) – page 12 Regulations for Performing Animal Protection Act Regulations of Seizure of Animals by SPCA’s – page 14 Animal Matters Amendment Act, 1993 - page 16
South Africa - Biological Diversity - Regulations These South African regulations were made relating to listed threatened and protected species of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004. The purpose of these regulations is to further regulate the permit system set out in Chapter 7 of the Biodiversity Act insofar as that system applies to restricted activities involving specimens of listed threatened or protected species; to provide for the registration of captive breeding operations, commercial exhibition facilities, game farms, nurseries, scientific institutions, sanctuaries and rehabilitation facilities and wildlife traders; to provide for the regulation of the carrying out of a specific restricted activity, namely hunting; to provide for the prohibition of specific restricted activities involving specific listed threatened or protected species; to provide for the protection of wild populations of listed threatened species; and to provide for the composition and operating procedure of the Scientific Authority.
South Africa - Biodiversity - National Environmental Management No. 10 of 2004: National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004. The objectives of this Act are, within the framework of the National Environmental Management Act, to provide for the management and conservation of biological diversity within the Republic and of the components of such biological diversity; to provide for the use of indigenous biological resources in a sustainable manner; and to provide for the fair and equitable sharing among stakeholders of benefits arising from bioprosgecting involving indigenous biological resources. Other objecitves of this Act are to give effect to ratified international agreements relating to biodiversity which are binding on the Republic; to provide for co-operative governance in biodiversity management and conservation; and to provide for a South African National Biodiversity Institute to assist in achieving the objectives of this Act.
SD - Veterinary - Chapter 36-12. Veterinarians. S D C L § 36-12-1 - 29 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
SD - Vehicle - SDCL § 41-1-12. Euthanasia of animal injured in motor vehicle accident SDCL § 41-1-12 - 13 Any person who has seriously injured a wildlife animal or who comes upon a wildlife animal that has been seriously injured in a motor vehicle accident may euthanize the animal if that person has the means, skill, and will to euthanize humanely.
SD - Vehicle - 41-1-5.7. Disposition of deer and antelope killed by motor vehicle S D C L § 41-1-5.7 This South Dakota statute states that if any deer or antelope is killed by a motor vehicle on a public highway, the person who desires to possess that animal shall notify a conservation officer. The conservation officer may give a dated and written authorization allowing possession of the animal at no fee. However, no part of an animal so obtained may be sold, bartered, or traded.
SD - Trust - 55-1-21. Trust for care of designated animal. S D C L § 55-1-21 South Dakota's pet trust law was enacted in 2006. Amendments to the law in 2018 provide that trusts for the care of a designated animal or animals are valid.
SD - Trap - 41-8-28. Trap robbing or injury as misdemeanor S D C L § 41-8-28 This South Dakota law provides that any person who steals, damages or destroys a trap of another, or who steals, damages, or destroys animals, animal carcasses, or the pelts thereof, held fast by such traps, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.
SD - Predator Control - Chapter 40-36. Predatory Animal and Reptile Control. S D C L § 40-36-1 - 46 These South Dakota statutes pertain to predatory animal and reptile control. The Department of Game, Fish and Parks and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service work together to control coyotes, feral dogs, fox, prairie dogs, and other wild animals that are injurious to livestock, poultry, game, land, and the public health. Bounties may be paid for coyotes, if the bounty hunter has a license.
SD - Lost Property - Chapter 43-41. Lost and Found Property. SDCL § 43-41-1 - 11 These statutes comprise South Dakota's lost property provisions.
SD - Licenses - 40-34-5. Running at large prohibited by county--County license or tax on dogs S D C L § 40-34-5 This South Dakota statute provides that the board of county commissioners of each of the counties shall have the power to regulate, restrain or prohibit the running at large of dogs and to impose a license or tax on all dogs not licensed or taxed under municipal ordinance, owned or kept by any person within the county.
SD - Hunting - 41-1-8. Interference with lawful hunting, trapping, or fishing prohibited--Violation as misdemeanor S D C L § 41-1-8 to 10 This South Dakota law reflects the state's hunter harassment provision. The law prohibits a person from intentionally interfering with any person or group of persons lawfully engaged in the process of taking or attempting to take any game or fish. This includes actions specifically intended to harass and any activity intended to scare or disturb game with the specific intent of preventing their lawful taking. Violation is a Class 2 misdemeanor.
SD - Fur - Chapter 40-35. Domesticated Fur-Bearing Animals. S D C L § 40-35-1 to 6 These South Dakota statutes pertain to domesticated fur-bearing animals. These animals are subject to private ownership, and documentation is required to possess live fur-bearing animals. Products made from domestic furbearers are considered to be agricultural products and breeding such animals, or marketing the products, is an agricultural pursuit subject to the Department of Agriculture.
SD - Facility dog - 23A-24-10. Certified therapeutic dogs--Definitions S D C L § 23A-24-10 - 12 In 2020, South Dakota enacted provisions for the use of "certified therapeutic dogs" for certain witnesses (children or those with developmental disabilities as defined in the law) in criminal proceedings. A certified therapeutic dog is defined as a dog that has received the requisite training or certification and is registered with Therapy Dogs Incorporated, Therapy Dogs International, Assistance Dogs International, or an equivalent organization to perform the duties associated with therapy dogs in places such as hospitals, nursing homes, and other facilities where the emotional benefits of therapy dogs are recognized. Before using the dog, the party desiring to utilize the presence of a certified therapeutic dog must file a motion containing listed information outside the presence of the jury. A handler may accompany the dog and sit behind or next to the witness stand.
SD - Exotic Pets - Chapter 40-3. State Animal Industry Board (captive wildlife provisions) S D C L § 40-3-23 - 30; SDCL § 7-12-29 These South Dakota statutes establish the Animal Industry Board, which promulgate rules to allow nondomestic mammals that are safe to the public and to the free-roaming animals of the state to be imported or possessed. The Board regulates the breeding, raising, marketing, and transportation of any captive nondomestic mammals. The Board may also develop and implement programs to identify animals and premises involved to further animal health and food safety.
SD - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 42-11. Equine Activities. S D C L § 42-11-1 to 5 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor, equine professional, doctor of veterinary medicine or any other person, is immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, there are exceptions to this rule: a person will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant. In addition, a person will also be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.
SD - Endangered Species - Chapter 34A-8. Endangered and Threatened Species S D C L § 34A-8-1 - 13; 34A-8A-1 - 9 These South Dakota statutes provide the definitions and regulations related to endangered and threatened species in the state. Under statute, state agencies shall establish and conduct control programs at state expense on private lands that are encroached upon by prairie dogs from contiguous public lands. It is a misdemeanor to take, possess, transport, import, export, process, sell or offer for sale, buy or offer to buy (nor may a common or contract carrier transport or receive for shipment) a listed species as defined by statute.
SD - Ecoterrorism - Chapter 40-38. Protection of Animal Facilities S D C L § 40-38-1 - 5 This chapter comprises South Dakota's animal enterprise interference laws. Under the section, it is illegal for a person to intentionally damage or destroy an animal facility, an animal, or property in or on the animal facility; exercise control over the animal facility or an animal located therein; enter the animal facility with the intent to commit prohibited acts; enter an animal facility and remain concealed with the intent to commit prohibited acts; or intentionally release an animal on an animal facility. Violation is a misdemeanor of varying degrees if the damaged property value is less than $1,000 and a Class 4 felony if above $1,000. Any person who violates subdivisions 40-38-2(2) to (5), inclusive, is guilty of a Class 4 felony.
SD - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws S D C L §9-29-12; S D C L § 40-1-41; S D C L § 40-34-1 - 16; S D C L 40-12-1 - 6; S D C L § 41-6-78; § 41-8-15; S D C L § 41-15-14; S D C L § 41-17-18.1 These South Dakota statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, vicious dog laws, and rabies vaccination provisions.
SD - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes S D C L § 9-29-11; S D C L § 40-1-1 - 41; S D C L § 40-2-1 - 9; S D C L § 43-39-12, 12.1; SDCL § 22-22-42, 43, 44 These South Dakota statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions. "Animal," any mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, or fish, except humans. "Cruelty” means to intentionally, willfully, and maliciously inflict gross physical abuse on an animal that causes prolonged pain, that causes serious physical injury, or that results in the death of the animal. Any person who subjects an animal to cruelty is guilty of a Class 6 felony. “Neglect,” means to fail to provide food, water, protection from the elements, adequate sanitation, adequate facilities, or care generally considered to be standard and accepted for an animal's health and well-being consistent with the species, breed, physical condition, and type of animal. Any person who neglects an animal is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. Exemptions include regulated scientific experiments using live animals and the destruction of dangerous animals.
SD - Bite - Chapter 40-34. Dog Licenses and Regulation (Vicious Dog Provisions) S D C L § 40-34-13 to 16 This South Dakota statute provides that a vicious dog, defined as any dog which, when unprovoked, in a vicious manner approaches in apparent attitude of attack, or bites, or otherwise attacks a human being including a mailman, meter reader, serviceman, etc. who is on private property by reason of permission of the owner, is a public nuisance. However, no dog may be declared vicious if an injury or damage is sustained to any person who was committing a willful trespass or other tort upon premises occupied by the owner or keeper of the dog, or who was teasing, tormenting, abusing or assaulting the dog or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.
SD - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws S D C L § 20-13-23.1 - 4, 32-27-7 - 8; 40-1-38 - 40; 43-32-33 - 36 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
Scotland - Wildlife - Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2011 2011 asp 6 This Act provides various protections to certain wild animals in Scotland, and makes amendments to the Nature Conservation (Scotland) Act 2004.
Scotland - Wildlife - Nature Conservation (Scotland) Act 2004 2004 asp 6 This Act makes amendments to the protection of wildlife under the Countryside and Wildlife Act 1981, and the Protection of Badgers Act 1992, in respect of Scotland. Wild animal protection is extended to include reckless as well as intentional acts. The Act also makes it an offence to disturb or harass a dolphin, whale or basking shark, and amends the provisions for enforcement.
Scotland - Wildlife - Marine (Scotland) Act 2010 Part 6 of this Act prohibits the killing, injuring or taking of seals. The same Part also provides a number of exceptions by licence, such as for the purpose of protecting the health and welfare of farmed fish; or preventing serious damage to fisheries or fish farms (section 110)
Scotland - Wild Mammals - Protection of Wild Mammals (Scotland) Act 2002 2002 asp 6 An Act to prohibit deliberate hunting of wild mammals with dogs. The Act also makes it an offence for an owner or occupier of land to knowingly allow another person to hunt wild mammals with dogs on their land. Stalking and flushing is exempted in certain circumstances, for example, in order to protect livestock, providing food for animal or consumption, or controlling pest species.
Scotland - Slaughter - The Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing (Scotland) Regulations 2012 2012 No. 321 These Regulations replace the Welfare of Animals (Slaughter or Killing) Regulations 1995 for Scotland in respect of slaughterhouse activities (the 1995 Regulations continue to have full effect in England and Wales). Provisions include: certificates of competence and handling and stunning requirements for a number of farmed species.
Scotland - Dogs, microchip - The Microchipping of Dogs (Scotland) Regulations 2016 2016 No. 58 Regulations providing for the compulsory microchipping of dogs and the recording of each dog’s identity and its keeper’s contact details on a database.
Scotland - Animal Welfare - Animals and Wildlife (Penalties, Protections and Powers) (Scotland) Act 2020 Scotland Act 2020 Scotland's 2020 legislation increased maximum available penalties for the most serious animal welfare offences, involving domesticated or wild animals, up to 5 years imprisonment and unlimited fines. Serious crimes include animal fighting and causing unnecessary suffering. The Act also prevents those who attack service animals in the course of their duties from relying on self-defence. Further, the Act requires the courts to consider whether disqualification orders are necessary to protect animal welfare, and to provide its reasons for reaching its decision in every case that reaches court.
Scotland - Animal Welfare - Animals and Wildlife (Penalties, Protections and Powers) (Scotland) Act 2020 2020 asp 14 This Act increased the maximum penalty for the most serious animal welfare and wildlife crimes in Scotland to five years imprisonment and unlimited fines. This includes penalties under the The Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006, the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, The Protection of Badgers Act 1992, the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996, the Deer (Scotland) Act 1996, and other animal welfare related legislation in Scotland. These include the offence of unnecessary suffering and animal fighting. The Act also incorporated 'Finn's Law' which will prevent those that harm service animals in the course of their duties from claiming that they did so in self-defence. The Act also creates new powers (by way of future secondary legislation) to impose fixed penalty notices for less serious offences. Further, the Act restricts licensing for the killing of seals, and provides mountain hares with general protection from killing.
Scotland - Animal Welfare - Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006 2006 asp 11 An Act establishing penalties for engaging in certain activities that are considered detrimental to animal welfare in Scotland. Part 1 of the Act contains detailed provisions concerning animal health and preventing the spread of disease. Activities that constitute offenses under Part 2 of the Act include: causing an animal unnecessary suffering, mutilating an animal’s body, docking a dog’s tail (with certain limited exceptions), administering a poisonous or injurious substance to an animal, and engaging in or attending animal fighting. Nothing in the Act applies to anything lawfully done under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 or to anything which occurs in the normal course of fishing.
Scotland - Animal Welfare - 2003 Proposal 2003 Proposal, Protection of Animals (Scotland) Act 1912 For historical purposes only. Law has been repealed and/or replaced. The Scottish Executive (SE) issued a consultation paper on 21st March 2003 on proposals to amend the Protection of Animals (Scotland) Act 1912. These proposals were aimed at addressing the specific problem of the lack of statutory powers available to local authorities to remove neglected farm livestock, which are suffering or at risk of suffering, to a place of safely. The responses from a number of organisations to that paper have shown a clear desire for a much wider reform of our existing animal welfare legislation. Ministers now wish to consider expanding the proposed amendment to the Protection of Animals (Scotland) Act 1912 and to introduce wider legislation aimed at consolidating and updating much of the existing animal welfare legislation in Scotland. The purpose of any new legislation will be to prevent cruelty to any animal and to set out the obligations of people to promote the welfare of all animals (including domestic pets) for which they are either permanently or temporarily responsible. This will include owning, managing, or in any way keeping any animal, including buying, selling and transporting.
SC - Wildlife - § 50-1-270. Liability for gross destruction or injury to wildlife, Code 1976 § 50-1-270 This South Carolina statute provides that any person or public or private entity is liable to the State for the unlawful gross destruction of or injury to wildlife, aquatic life, endangered or threatened species, or the lands or waters owned by the State. For a deliberate or grossly negligent act, the State must be awarded damages of three times the value of the resource affected, plus costs, including attorney's fees. This section does not apply to ordinary agricultural practices.
SC - Wildlife - § 50-1-125. Wildlife defined; penalties for trafficking in wildlife. Code 1976 § 50-1-125, § 50-1-290 These South Carolina statutes define wildlife as being a wild animal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk, crustacean, or product, egg, offspring, or dead body parts. It is illegal to buy, sell, or possess wildlife except as specifically allowed by this title. A violation is a misdemeanor, and the person could face a fine and/or imprisonment.
SC - Wildlife - Chapter 16. Importation of Wildlife. Code 1976 § 50-16-10 to 70; § 50-11-1765 This set of South Carolina laws relates to the possession of live wildlife. A permit is required for the following: the family Cervidae, a nondomestic member of the families Suidae (pigs), Tayassuidae (peccaries), Bovidae (bison, mountain goat, mountain sheep), coyote, bear, or turkey (genus Meleagris), and a "furbearer," which includes, but is not limited to, red and gray fox, raccoon, opossum, muskrat, mink, skunk, otter, bobcat, weasel, and beaver. However, wildlife imported for exhibition purposes only by state wildlife departments, municipal zoos or parks, public museums, public zoological parks, and public scientific or educational institutions operated not for profit, and transient circuses are not required to procure a permit. Under another section, release of a member of the family Suidae (pig) into the wild is prohibited except as provided by law. Further, it is unlawful for a person to possess, transport, or otherwise bring into the state or release or introduce into the state any diseased wildlife or other animal that reasonably might be expected to pose a public health or safety hazard. Violating any permitting requirement under the chapter results in a misdemeanor with a mandatory fine of not more than $1,000 or up to 6 months imprisonment, or both.
SC - Veterinary - Chapter 69. Veterinarians. Code 1976 § 40-69-5 to 305 These are the state's veterinary practice laws amended in 2006. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
SC - Trust - § 62-7-408. Trust for care of animal Code 1976 § 62-7-408 South Carolina's pet trust law was originally enacted in 2006. A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal or animals alive or in gestation during the settlor's lifetime, whether or not alive at the time the trust is created. The trust terminates upon the death of the last surviving animal.
SC - Pet Sales - § 47-13-160. Fitness of registered companion dog or cat for sale; definitions; certifications; remedies. Code 1976 § 47-13-160 This South Carolina statute provides that no pet dealer, pet shop, or pet breeder shall sell a registered companion dog or cat without providing to the purchaser a statement certifying that the dog or cat has received an infectious disease inoculation. If at any time within fourteen days following the sale and delivery of a registered companion dog or cat to a purchaser, a licensed veterinarian certifies the animal to be unfit for purchase due to a noncongenital cause or condition or within six months certifies an animal to be unfit for purchase due to a congenital or hereditary cause or condition, a purchaser has the right to elect one of the following options described in the statute. This section is apparently limited to registered dogs or cats.
SC - Ordinances - § 47-3-20. Local animal care and control ordinances authorized. Code 1976 § 47-3-20 This South Carolina statute provides that the governing body of each county or municipality in this State may enact ordinances and promulgate regulations for the care and control of dogs, cats, and other animals and to prescribe penalties for violations.
SC - Lien, boarding - § 29-15-60. Animal boarding facilities; liens upon animals for boarding expenses. Code 1976 § 29-15-60 This South Carolina law states that the owner of an animal boarding facility, at the end of an agreed upon term of boarding, shall have a lien upon any animal which is left for upkeep until the cost has been paid by the owner of the animal. The owner of the animal shall also be responsible for payment of the cost of care for the animal after notice of the lien. If the owner of the animal has not paid the cost after actual notice of the lien within ten days of such notice, the animal boarding facility owner may sell the animal after having advertised the time and place of the sale at least seven days before the sale is to be held.
SC - Leash - § 51-3-145. Certain acts unlawful at state parks. Code 1976 § 51-3-145 This South Carolina law contains a dog leash provision that states that it is unlawful for any person to bring a dog or any other animal into the park or facility unless it is crated, caged, or upon a leash not longer than six feet or otherwise under physically restrictive control at all times (see section P). This provision concerns any park or facility under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

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