Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
NY - Municipal power - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 124 This New York law provides that the commissioner is hereby authorized to (a) promulgate, after public hearing, such rules and regulations as are necessary to supplement and give full effect to the provisions of sections one hundred thirteen, one hundred fourteen and one hundred seventeen of this article; and (b) exercise all other powers and functions as are necessary to carry out the duties and purposes set forth in sections one hundred thirteen, one hundred fourteen and one hundred seventeen of this article.
NY - Lost Dog - Article 7-B. Lost and Found Property. McKinney's Personal Property Law § 251 to 258 This section comprises New York's Lost and Found Property provisions.
NY - Lien upon strays - § 310. Lien upon strays McKinney's Town Law § 310 If any person finds any livestock on their enclosed land, or finds livestock on their land doing damage, and the livestock did not come from adjoining lands because of the refusal or neglect to erect a division fence required by law, such person may have a lien over all other liens on such livestock. The lien shall last for as long as such person retains possession of the livestock, and as long as the damage remains to his land, until the damages, charges, fees, and costs are paid for keeping the livestock.
NY - Licenses - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. Article 7. Licensing, Identification and Control of Dogs McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 110 This New York statute provides the schedule of license fees for all dogs. It also enables local municipalities to enact licensing ordinances in addition to the fee proscribed by statute. This additional revenue shall be used only for controlling dogs and enforcing this article and any rule, regulation, or local law or ordinance adopted pursuant thereto, including subsidizing the spaying or neutering of dogs and subsidizing public humane education programs in responsible dog ownership.
NY - Licenses - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 109 This New York statute provides that the owner of any dog reaching the age of four months shall immediately make application for a dog license. Certain villages and other municipalities may provide for differing licensure regulations as described in this statute. The statute outlines the specific application procedures for obtaining a license, including a purebred license.
NY - Impound - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 118 This New York law outlines the violations related to licensing of dogs. Any owner who fails to license any dog; fails to have a dog identified as required; knowingly affixes false or improper licensing, including that which identifies it as an assistance dog; fails to confine or restrain his or her dog as required; furnishes false or misleading information in connection with this article; fails to exercise diligence in handling his or her dog, which results in harm to a service dog; commits a violation. It shall be the duty of the dog control officer of any municipality to bring an action against any person who has committed within such municipality any violation of this section. Any municipality may elect either to prosecute such action as a violation under the penal law or to commence an action to recover a civil penalty.
NY - Impound - Article 5. Powers, Limitations, and Liabilities. McKinney's General Municipal Law § 88 This New York statute provides that a municipality may by local law or ordinance provide that stray or unwanted dogs be given to an agency which trains seeing eye dogs or to a police department which trains dogs as guards. These agencies can requisition dogs that are awaiting destruction so long as five days have elapsed since the dog was impounded. Licensed dogs surrendered to the municipality or an animal shelter shall not be requisitioned without the written consent of the owner obtained at the time of the surrender.
NY - Hunting, Internet - 11-1906 On-line shoots prohibited. McKinney's E. C. L. § 11-1906, McKinney's E. C. L. § 71-0923 This statute prohibits online shooting in the state of New York. Violation of the statute is punishable by a fine of not more than 2,500 dollars.
NY - Hunting, Interent - § 11-1906. On-line shoots prohibited McKinney's E. C. L. § 11-1906 Under this New York law, no person, firm, corporation, partnership, limited liability company, association or other business entity shall (1) own or operate a shooting range or gallery located in this state for purposes of the on-line shooting or spearing of targets or animals; or (2) create, maintain or utilize a website via the internet, or a service or business via any other means, from any location within this state for purposes of the on-line shooting or spearing of targets or animals. Per McKinney's ECL § 71-0923, a violation of section 11-1906 is punishable by a fine of not more than two thousand five hundred dollars.
NY - Hunting - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws McKinney's E. C. L. § 11-1904 This New York statute provides that no person who owns, operates or manages a facility that harbors non-native big game mammals shall knowingly permit the taking on such premises by any person who pays a fee to take a live non-native big game mammal by any of the following means: the shooting or spearing of a non-native big game mammal that is tied or hobbled; the shooting or spearing of a non-native big game mammal that is staked or attached to any object; the shooting or spearing of a non-native big game mammal that is confined in a box, pen, cage or similar container of ten or less contiguous acres from which there is no means for such mammal to escape, among other things.
NY - Fur - Title 11. Trapping McKinney's E. C. L. § 11-1101 to 11-1109 This set of New York laws sets forth the state's trapping laws. Among the laws includes a ban on traps of the leg-gripping type having teeth in the jaws; traps that operate such that wildlife is suspended when caught; and noose-type snares. No person shall set or use a body gripping type trap with a dimension of more than 7 1/2 inches except as provided by state rules for for trapping beaver or otter during the open season. Traps must bear the name and residence address or the assigned identification number of the operator at all times. Traps must be visited once every 24 hours except in the Northern Zone where it's once every 48 hours.
NY - Fur - Chapter 20. Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's General Business Law § 399-aaa Makes it illegal for any person, firm, partnership or corporation to knowingly import, sell at retail or manufacture clothing with fur which is not properly labeled as containing "faux fur" or "real fur." Defines appropriate labeling by adding the appropriate description to the permanent tag attached to the clothing, a temporary tag to identify the clothing, or by affixing a sticker with the description in a conspicuous place on the clothing. Sets the maximum punishment to not exceed a $500 fine for the first violation and not to exceed $1000 for each subsequent violation.
NY - Food Service - § 1352-e. Companion dogs at food service establishments McKinney's Public Health Law § 1352-e This statute allows for companion dogs in an outdoor dining area at a food service establishment in the state of New York. The companion dogs are allowed at an outdoor dining area if the owner of the establishment allows companion dogs, a separate outdoor entrance is available for the companion dog to enter the dining area, and the outdoor area where the companion dog is allowed is not used for food or drink preparation. The statute also outlines a number of other requirements that the owner of the establishment and owner of the companion dog must follow in order to be in compliance with this statute.
NY - Exotic Pets - Chapter 69 Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 370 This New York law provides that any person who owns or possesses a wild animal or reptile capable of inflicting bodily harm upon a human being, who fails to exercise due care in safeguarding the public from attack by such wild animal or reptile, is guilty of a misdemeanor. The punishment for violation is imprisonment for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars, or by both. The second part of the law imposes strict liability upon owners of dangerous wild animals.
NY - Exotic - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's E. C. L. § 11-0917 This New York laws begin by stating that wild game and other wildlife may only be possessed if lawfully taken in compliance with the Fish and Wildlife Law and the accompanying regulations. Skunk, bobcat, mink, raccoon and muskrat may be bought and sold alive during their respective open seasons. No live wolf, coyote, coydog, fox, skunk, venomous reptile or raccoon shall be possessed or transported, except under a license or permit issued by the department. Every such license or permit shall contain a prominent notice warning the licensee or permittee of his or her duty to exercise due care in safeguarding the public from attack; failure to do so is a crime under section three hundred seventy of the agriculture and markets law.
NY - Exotic - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's E. C. L. § 11-0501 to 11-0540 This set of New York statutes provides some of the state's fish and wildlife laws. Among the provisions include a prohibition against interference with wildlife, restriction on the possession and importation of certain wildlife such as wolves, wolfdogs, coyotes, coydogs, foxes, skunks, and venomous reptiles, and laws that allows individuals to take destructive wildlife. No person shall knowingly possess, harbor, sell, barter, transfer, exchange or import any wild animal for use as a pet in New York state, except that any person who possessed a wild animal for use as a pet at the time that this section went effect may retain possession of such animal for the remainder of its life.
NY - Equine Activity - Article18-B. Safety in Agricultural Tourism McKinney's General Obligations Law § 18-301 - 303 This 2017 New York set of laws is known as the “safety in agricultural tourism act." The activities defined as agricultural tourism are broad, and include equine therapy, u-pick Christmas trees, touring farms, and hunting on farms. The act requires that operators of agricultural tourism areas post at every point of sale or distribution of tickets a conspicuous “Warning to Visitors” relative to the inherent risks of participating in activities on working farms and to provide written information based on requirements from the commissioner of agriculture. Owners and operators of agricultural tourism areas shall not be liable for an injury to or death of a visitor if the provisions of this subdivision are complied with
NY - Enforcement, Conservation - Article 71. Enforcement. McKinney's ECL § 71-0101 to 71-0927 This set of statutes outlines the procedures and penalties for violations of New York's Environmental Conservation Law.
NY - Enforcement - Agriculture and Markets Law - Article 3. Investigation; Practice and Procedure; Violations; Penalties. McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 32 - 45-c This article outlines the procedures and penalties for violations of New York's Agriculture and Markets Law.
NY - Endangered Species - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. N.Y. Envtl. Conserv. Law § 11-0535 The New York code for endangered species defines endangered species as any species which meets one of the following criteria: native species in imminent danger of extirpation or extinction in New York; or species listed as endangered by the United States Department of the Interior in the Code of Federal Regulations (50 CFR part 17).
NY - Education - § 809. Instruction in the humane treatment of animals McKinney's Education Law § 809 This New York law requires those officers, boards or commissions authorized or required to prescribe courses of instruction that receive public funding to establish a humane education curriculum as described. Additionally, the law states that any school that uses animal for study must provide: (1) appropriate quarters; (2) sufficient space for the normal behavior and postural requirements of the species; (3) proper ventilation, lighting, and temperature control; (4) adequate food and clean drinking water; and (5) quarters which shall be cleaned on a regular basis and located in an area where undue stress and disturbance are minimized. With regard to dissection, the law allows any student who expresses a moral or religious objection to performing or witnessing the dissection of an animal to be provided the opportunity to undertake an alternative project. This request by the student must be substantiated in writing by the student's parent or legal guardian. Students who decline dissection are not to be penalized under the law and parents and students must be notified about their rights under this law. Finally, the law prohibits certain experimentation on live vertebrate animals.
NY - Ecoterrorism - § 378. Unlawful tampering with animal research McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 378 This New York law comprises the state's ecoterrorism provision. A person who has been given "notice," as defined by the law, is guilty of the crime of "unlawful tampering with animal research" if he or she: (1) knowingly or intentionally releases an animal from a facility or causes the abandonment of an animal knowing that such animal was exposed to infectious agents prior to such release or abandonment and was capable of transmitting such infectious agents to humans; or (2) with intent to do so, causes loss or damage to secret scientific material, and having no right to do so nor any reasonable ground to believe that he has such right, causes loss of or damage to any secret scientific material in an amount in excess of two hundred fifty dollars at a facility.
NY - Eagles - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws. N.Y. Envtl. Conserv. Law § 11-0537 New York makes it illegal to "knowingly or with wanton disregard for the consequences" take, transport, possess, or engage in commerce of bald eagles or their parts without a valid permit. This incorporates the exact language of the federal act.
NY - Domestic Violence - Article 8. Family Offenses Proceedings. McKinney's Family Court Act § 842 This New York law pertains to the issuance of protection orders. In July of 2006, the amendment that allows companion animals owned by the petitioner of the order or a minor child residing in the household to be included in the order was signed into law. The law specifically allows a court to order the respondent to refrain from intentionally injuring or killing, without justification, any companion animal the respondent knows to be owned, possessed, leased, kept or held by the petitioner or a minor child residing in the household (subsection (i)(1) - (2)).
NY - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 106 - 127, 331 - 332, 400 - 410; McKinney's ECL §§ 11-0529, 11-0901 - 0928, 11-2117; McKinney's General Business Law §§ 399-aa, 751 - 755; McKinney's General Municipal Law § 88, 209-cc; These New York statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include state licensing requirements, the sale of dogs by pet dealers, rabies control laws, and provisions related to dogs and hunting.
NY - Disaster - Article 2-B. State and Local Natural and Man-Made Disaster Preparedness. Agriculture and Markets Law. McKinney's Executive Law § 22, 23; McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 410; McKinney's Public Authorities Law § 1264-a; McK.Unconsol.Laws § 6408-e In New York, disaster emergency plans must include utilization and coordination of programs to assist individuals with household pets and service animals. Particular emphasis must be on evacuation, shelter and transportation options following a disaster.
NY - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 123, 123-a This New York statute provides that statutory penalties for dog bites and the process for declaring a dog "dangerous." Any person who witnesses an attack or threatened attack, or in the case of a minor, an adult acting on behalf of such minor, may make a complaint of an attack or threatened attack upon a person, companion animal, farm animal, or a domestic animal to a dog control officer or police officer of the appropriate municipality. Such officer shall immediately inform the complainant of his or her right to commence a proceeding as provided in subdivision two of this section and, if there is reason to believe the dog is a dangerous dog, the officer shall forthwith commence such proceeding himself or herself. Upon a finding that a dog is dangerous, the judge or justice may order humane euthanasia or permanent confinement of the dog if one listed aggravating circumstances is established at the judicial hearing.
NY - Dangerous animal - § 209-cc. Notification of presence of wild animals and dangerous dogs McKinney's General Municipal Law § 209-cc New York state law requires anyone in possession of dangerous dogs and dangerous wild animals (which include non-human primates, non-domesticated dogs and cats, bears, venomous, constrictors and python snakes, and certain crocodiles) to report the presence of that animal to the clerk of the city, town, or village in which the animal resides. The report must be filed by April 1st every year and must list all of the physical locations where the animal may be kept. The clerk must then notify all local police, fire, and emergency medical service departments of the presence of that animal. Any person who fails to report the presence may be fined up to $250 dollars for the first offense and $1,000 dollars for each subsequent offense. Zoos and other U.S. Department of Agriculture-licensed exhibitors are exempt from the reporting requirement.
NY - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 331 - 381; McKinney's Penal Law § 130.20 These New York statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty provisions. "Animal" includes every living creature except a human being. A person who overdrives, overloads, tortures or cruelly beats or unjustifiably injures, maims, mutilates or kills any animal, or deprives any animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars, or by both. Exclusions include properly conducted scientific tests, experiments or investigations, involving the use of living animals approved by the state commissioner of health.
NY - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 108, 110, 118, 123-b; McKinney's General Obligations Law § 11-107; McKinney's Civil Rights Law § 47, 47-a to c; McKinney's Penal Law § 195.11 - 12; § 242.00 - .15; McKinney's Public Housing Law § 223-a, b The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
NV - Wildlife - Chapter 501. Administration and Enforcement. NRS § 501.097 "Wildlife" means any wild mammal, wild bird, fish, reptile, amphibian, mollusk or crustacean found naturally in a wild state, whether indigenous to Nevada or not and whether raised in captivity or not.
NV - Veterinary - Chapter 638. Veterinarians. General Provisions. N. R. S. 638.001 - 638.200 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
NV - Trusts - Chapter 163. Trusts. Creation and Validity of Trusts. 163.0075. Validity of trust providing for care of one or mor N. R. S. 163.0075 This Nevada statute allows for a trust created for the care of one or more animals that are alive at the time of the settlor's death (note the statute does not state "domestic" or "pet" animal). Such a trust terminates upon the death of all animals covered by the terms of the trust. It further provides that a settlor's expression of intent must be liberally construed in favor of the creation of such a trust.
NV - Sales, pet - 597.997. Prohibition on certain offers to lease living animal or goods N. R. S. 597.997 This Nevada law, enacted in 2017, prohibits a person from offering a lease on living animals for personal or household use, if the living animal is expected to have not more than a de minimis residual financial value at the end of the term of the lease or contract. The failure of a person to comply with this section constitutes a deceptive trade practice. A violation of this section constitutes consumer fraud for the purposes of NRS 41.600
NV - Research - 574.205. Requirement to offer dog or cat for adoption before euthanization; immunity from civil liability N. R. S. 574.205 This Nevada law, enacted in 2015, mandates that a research facility that intends to euthanize a dog or cat for any purpose other than scientific, medical or educational research shall, before euthanizing the dog or cat, offer the dog or cat for adoption if the dog or cat is appropriate for adoption. This adoption may be completed through an adoption program of the research facility or through a collaborative agreement with an animal rescue organization.
NV - Property - Chapter 193. General Provisions. N. R. S. 193.021 Dogs, domestic animals and birds are considered personal property in Nevada.
NV - Pet Sales - Title 50. Animals. Chapter 574. Cruelty to Animals: Prevention and Penalties N. R. S. 574.450 to 574.510 This Nevada statutory section comprises the state's pet sale laws. The law protects purchasers of pets by ensuring minimum standards of care at retail pet stores and allows purchasers to return "defective" pets within ten days of purchase.
NV - Migratory bird - 503.620. Protection of birds included in Migratory Bird Treaty Act N.R.S. 503.620 This Nevada law makes it unlawful for any person to hunt or take any dead or alive birds, nests of birds or eggs of birds protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of July 3, 1918 (16 U.S.C. §§ 703 et seq.) or accompanying regulations.
NV - Lien - 108.540. Lien upon animals; priority; demand for payment; foreclosure; penalty for taking or driving away animal N.R.S. 108.540 Any person furnishing feed, pasture or otherwise boarding any animal(s), at the request or with the consent of the owner, has a lien upon the animal(s), and may retain possession thereof until the sum due for the feed, pasture or board has been paid. Before foreclosing the lien by sale, the person furnishing the feed, pasture or board shall mail a registered or certified letter to the owner of the animal(s), at the owner's last known address, demanding payment. Any person who takes and drives away any such animal(s), while in the possession of the person feeding, pasturing or boarding them, without the consent of that person, and without first having paid all reasonable charges due thereon, is guilty of a misdemeanor.
NV - Leash Law - Chapter 503. Hunting, Fishing and Trapping; Miscellaneous Protective Measures N.R.S. 503.631, 636 This Nevada statute makes it illegal to permit such dog to run at large if such dog is actively tracking, pursuing, harassing, attacking or killing any wildlife in a state-owned wildlife management area.
NV - Invasive - 503.597. Introduction or removal of aquatic life or wildlife N. R. S. 503.597 This Nevada law is aimed at aquatic invasive and injurious species. It states that, except as provided, it is unlawful, except by the written consent and approval, for any person at any time to receive, bring, or remove from one stream or body of water in this State to any other, or from one portion of the State to any other, or to any other state, any aquatic life or wildlife, or any spawn, eggs or young of any of them. A person who knowingly or intentionally introduces or attempts to introduce an aquatic invasive species or injurious aquatic species into any waters of this State is guilty of a misdemeanor for a first offense, and a category E felony for subsequent offenses. Additionally, a person convicted must pay a civil penalty of at least $25,000 but not more than $250,000, which is deposited into the Wildlife Account in the State General Fund to fight aquatic invasive species.
NV - Hunting, exotics - 504.295. Prohibited acts; regulations; licenses; inapplicability to alternative livestock N. R. S. 504.295 Under this Nevada statute, unless otherwise provided by statute no person may possess any live wildlife unless he is licensed by the division to do so, capture live wildlife in this state to stock a commercial or noncommercial wildlife facility, or possess or release from confinement any mammal for the purposes of hunting. However, the provisions of this section do not apply to alternative livestock and products made therefrom.
NV - Hunting - Chapter 503. Hunting, Fishing and Trapping N. R. S. 503.015 This law represents Nevada's hunter harassment provision. It is unlawful for a person, or a group of people acting together, to intentionally interfere with another person who is lawfully hunting or trapping. This section does not apply to any incidental interference from lawful activity by users of the public land, including without limitation ranchers, miners or persons seeking lawful recreation.
NV - Horses, wild - 504.490. Unlawful acts; penalty N.R.S. 504.490 This Nevada law prohibits any unauthorized person from doing certain acts with regard to wild horses such as removing them from public lands, harassing wild horses, or using aircraft or a motor vehicle to hunt wild horses (among other listed actions). Violation is a gross misdemeanor. A person who willfully and maliciously kills a wild horse is guilty of a category C felony.
NV - Equine Activity - Limitations on liability; duties of a participant in an equine activity; exceptions; definitions Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 41.519 This Nevada statute limits the liability of equine sponsors and professionals, veterinarians, or any other person, for an injury to or death of a participant as a result of an inherent risk of equine activity. The statute also provides the duties that equine activity participants must complete. Finally, the statute provides the exceptions for when a person is not immune from civil liability under the statute and the definition of terms used within the statute.
NV - Endangered Species - Protection and Propagation of Native Fauna (Chapter 503) N. R. S. 503.584 - 503.589 These statutes provide that the Legislature of Nevada has an interest in protecting native species from extinction and sets forth the authority to establish programs to protect designated species. However, if a native species is found to be destructive under the statute, the statute provides for removal if appropriate. Under statute, the ultimate responsibility for management rests with the governor for reviewing state programs and entering into interstate and federal agreements.
NV - Eagle - Chapter 503. Hunting, Fishing and Trapping; N.R.S. 503.610 Nevada has a law that specifically protects both bald (American) and golden eagles. The statute makes it illegal to possess or capture by whatever means either species. The law does allow for the taking of an eagle pursuant to permit only if the eagle has seriously injured agricultural or other interests, provided it is consistent with federal law and no other alternative is appropriate.
NV - Domestic Violence - Chapter 33. Injunctions. Orders for Protection Against Domestic Violence. N. R. S. 33.018, 33.030 In Nevada, a knowing, purposeful or reckless course of conduct intended to harass the other such as injuring or killing an animal, is included in their definition of Domestic Violence. A victim can then get a Protection Order and enjoin the adverse party from physically injuring, threatening to injure or taking possession of any animal that is owned or kept by the applicant or minor child, either directly or through an agent.
NV - Dog Ordinance - 244.359. Ordinance concerning control of animals N. R. S. 244.359 This Nevada statute provides that each board of county commissioners may enact and enforce an ordinance related to dogs including licensing, regulating or prohibiting the running at large and disposal of all kinds of animals, establishing a pound, designating an animal as inherently dangerous and requiring the owner of such an animal to obtain a policy of liability insurance, among other things.
NV - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws N. R. S. 193.021; N. R. S. 202.500; N. R. S. 206.150; N. R. S. 244.359; N. R. S. 269.225; N. R. S. 289.595; N. R. S. 503.631, 636; N. R. S. 568.370; N.R.S. 574.600 - 670; N.R.S. 575.020 These statutes comprise Nevada's dog laws. Among the provisions include a link to proper care requirements for companion animals, animal control ordinance provisions, and the dangerous dog law among others.

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