Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
LA - Cruelty, reporting - § 403.6. Reporting of neglect or abuse of animals LSA-R.S. 14:403.6 This Louisiana law states that any state or local law enforcement officer, or any employee of government or of a government contractor who in his professional capacity routinely investigates alleged abuse or neglect or sexual abuse of a child, or abuse or neglect of an adult, who becomes aware of evidence of neglect or abuse of an animal shall report such incident to the law enforcement authority of the governing authority in which the incident has occurred or the local animal welfare authority.
LA - Cruelty - § 89. Crime against nature LSA-R.S. 14:89 This Louisiana law makes it a crime against nature to engage in "unnatural carnal copulation by a human being with another of the same sex or opposite sex or with an animal." This results in a penalty of a fine of not more than two thousand dollars, and imprisonment, with or without hard labor, for not more than five years, or both. In 2018, the legislature added a new section dedicated to sexual abuse of animals.
LA - Facility dog - § 284. Facility dogs; use in court; procedure LSA-R.S. 15:284 This 2018 Louisiana law allows a witness who is under 18 or who has a developmental disability (as defined) to have a facility dog, if available, accompany him or her while testifying in court. Additionally, the court may allow any witness who does not meet those criteria to have a facility dog, if available, while testifying in court. Under this section, a "facility dog" means a dog that is certified and a graduate of an assistance dog organization that is accredited by Assistance Dogs International or a similar internationally recognized organization whose main purpose is to grant accreditation to assistance dog organizations based on standards of excellence in all areas of assistance dog acquisition, training, and placement.
LA - Disaster - Chapter 6. The Louisiana Homeland Security and Emergency Assistance and Disaster Act. LSA-R.S. 29:726, 29:729 In Louisiana, the Governor's Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness must assist in the formulation of emergency operation plans for the humane evacuation, transport, and temporary sheltering of service animals and household pets (see section (E)(20(a)).
LA - Veterinary - Veterinarians. LSA-R.S. 37:1511 - 70 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
LA - Vehicle, animal - § 1738.1. Immunity from liability; gratuitous emergency care to domestic animal LSA-R.S. 37:1738.1 This 2018 Louisiana law states that there shall be no liability on the part of a person for property damage or trespass to a motor vehicle, if the damage was caused while the person was rescuing an animal in distress. The person must first do the following: (1) make a good-faith attempt to locate the owner before forcibly entering the vehicle (based on the circumstances); (2) contact local law enforcement/911 before forcibly entering; (3) determine the vehicle is locked and has a good-faith belief there is no other reasonable means for the animal to be removed; (3) believe that removal of the animal is necessary because the animal is in imminent danger of death; (4) use no more force than necessary to rescue the animal; (5) place a notice on the windshield providing details including contact information and the location of the animal; and (6) remain with the animal in a safe location reasonably close to the vehicle until first responders arrive. For purposes of the law, "animal” means any cat or dog kept for pleasure, companionship, or other purposes that are not purely commercial.
LA - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes LSA-R.S. 3:2361 - 2367; LSA-R.S. 14:102 - .29 These Louisiana statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty provisions. The term "cruel" is defined in the first section every act or failure to act whereby unjustifiable physical pain or suffering is caused or permitted. The crime of cruelty to animals is subdivided into simple cruelty or aggravated cruelty. Simple cruelty occurs when a person intentionally or with criminal negligence overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, or overworks, torments, cruelly beats, or unjustifiably injures, or, having charge, custody, or possession of any animal, either as owner or otherwise, unjustifiably fails to provide any living animal with proper food, proper drink, proper shelter, or proper veterinary care.
LA - Cruelty - Chapter 17. Cruelty to Animals (Corporations for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) LSA-R.S. 3:2391 - 2501 These chapters concerns the powers and duties of Louisiana corporations for prevention of cruelty to animals.
LA - Leash - Chapter 18. Animals Running at Large LSA-R.S. 3:2771 This Louisiana law states that no person shall permit any dog in his or her possession to run at large on any unenclosed land, or trespass upon any enclosed or unenclosed lands of another.
LA - Horses - § 2851. Livestock not to go on paved, black-topped and asphalt treated highways LSA-R.S. 3:2851 Under this Louisiana law, it is unlawful for lawful for horses, mules, donkeys, or asses to go on the paved, black-topped and asphalt treated highways of the state.
LA - Domestic Violence - Chapter 28. Protection from Family Violence Act. LSA-R.S. 46:2135 This Louisiana law allows a court to enter a temporary restraining order, without bond, as it deems necessary to protect from abuse the petitioner. Among the provisions is subsection (A)(7) that allows the court to grant ". . . to the petitioner the exclusive care, possession, or control of any pets belonging to or under the care of the petitioner or minor children residing in the residence or household of either party, and directing the defendant to refrain from harassing, interfering with, abusing or injuring any pet, without legal justification, known to be owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either party or a minor child residing in the residence or household of either party." In 2015, the state allowed the court shall consider any and all past history of abuse, or threats thereof, in determining the existence of an immediate and present danger of abuse.
LA - Hunting - § 116.5. Computer-assisted remote hunting prohibited; penalties LSA-R.S. 56:116.5 This Louisiana law provides that it is a class six violation for any person to engage in computer-assisted remote hunting or provide or operate a facility or provide services that allow others to engage in computer-assisted remote hunting.
LA - Endangered Species - THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION LSA-R.S. 56:1901 - 07 These Louisiana statutes set forth the legislative policy, definitions, and factors for listing endangered species. Additionally, the commission is authorized to issue and promote the sale to the general public of "endangered species" stamps as an additional source of funding for implementation of programs under these statutes. Violation of these provisions may result in a class four or class six violation.
LA - Reptiles - § 632.5.1. Constrictors and poisonous snakes LSA-R.S. 56:632.5.1 This Louisiana law provides that certain species of constrictor snakes in excess of eight feet long and venomous snakes shall only be allowed by permit issued by the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries except for animals kept by animal sanctuaries, zoos, aquariums, wildlife research centers, scientific organizations, and medical research facilities as defined in the Animal Welfare Act. Violation of the provisions of this Section or rules adopted pursuant thereto shall constitute a class three violation.
LA - Hunting, Trapping, and Fishing - Chapter 1. General Provisions for Wildlife and Fisheries. LSA-R.S. 56:648 - 56:648.3 This section comprises Louisiana's hunter harassment laws. Under R.S. 56:648.1, no person may engage in such activities as interfering with the lawful taking of wildlife, disturbing a wild animal or otherwise affecting its behavior with the intent to prevent or hinder lawful taking, disturb any hunter, trapper, or fisherman who is engaged in lawful taking, or enter or remain on state-managed lands/water or private lands/water with the intent to violate this section. Violation of the provisions of R.S. 56:648.1 constitutes a class two violation. The section allows the issuance of an injunction and recovery of actual damages by persons affected by such conduct.
LA - Trust - § 2263. Trust for the care of an animal LSA-R.S. 9:2263 This law enacted in 2015 allows the creation of a trust may to provide for the care of one or more animals that are "in being and ascertainable" on the date of the creation of the trust. The trust may designate a caregiver for each animal. The trust terminates on the death of the last surviving animal named in the trust. The "comments" that follow the statutory language provide some interesting explanation of several provisions of the new law.
LA - Equine Activity Liability - § 2795.1. Limitation of liability of farm animal activity LSA-R.S. 9:2795.1 - 9:2795.3 The Louisiana law regarding equine activity liability is divided into two sections; one related to "farm animal activity" and one specific to "equine activity sponsors." Both statutes have identical terms, save for the animal to which the statute pertains. Under both, engaging in the farm animal or equine activity does not include being a spectator at a farm animal activity, except in cases where the spectator places himself in an unauthorized area and in immediate proximity to the farm animal or equine activity. The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law and any written contracts must include the statutory language provided. Failure to comply with the requirements concerning warning notices provided prevents a farm animal activity sponsor or equine sponsor from invoking the privilege of immunity provided by this section.
LA - Exotic animals - § 2796.2. Limitation of liability for loss connected LSA-R.S. 9:2796.2 This Louisiana law states that no person shall have a cause of action against any nonprofit organization which operates or maintains a tax-exempt animal sanctuary for any injury, death, loss, or damage in connection with the Chimp Haven Festival, Dixie Chimps art contest, Les Boutiques de Noel, SciPort and Chimp Haven events, Run Wild and Have a Field Day, Eye-20 Art Show Gala, Krewe of Barkus and Meow Paws parade, Krewe of Centaur parade, Krewe of Highland parade, garden tour, ChimpStock, and any other educational and public awareness activities in which the organization sponsors or participates, unless the loss or damage was caused by the deliberate and wanton act or gross negligence of the organization or any officer, employee, or volunteer thereof.
LA - Lien, veterinary - § 4661. Feed, medicine, and veterinary services for horses LSA-R.S. 9:4661 This Louisiana law comprises the state's veterinary lien law, which relates only to services provided on horses. Any person who furnishes feed or medicines for a horse or horses, or any licensed veterinarian who furnishes medical services for a horse or horses, to or upon the order of the owner, has a privilege for the unpaid portion of the price thereof upon the horse or horses of the owner, which received the feed, medicine, or medical services.
IN - Cow Slaughter - THE GUJARAT ANIMAL PRESERVATION ACT, 1954 LXXII of 1954 The Act, specific to the western Indian state of Gujarat, prohibits the slaughter of cattle. A person transporting cattle from one region or the state to another is deemed to be transporting them for slaughter unless they are able to prove otherwise. Persons are prohibited from selling, storing, transporting or offering for sale beef or beef products. Animals other than cattle may be slaughtered, but may be slaughtered only after a certificate is issued by the Competent Authority. Offences under this Act are cognizable—this means that offenders may be arrested without a warrant. Offences under this Act carry with them imprisonment or fines.
MI - Exotic Pets - Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Large Carnivore Act M. C. L. A. 287.1101 - 1123 This Michigan law bans acquisition and possession of large carnivores (big cats and bears), though it grandfathered animals already owned as pets at the time of the law's enactment. In order to maintain public safety and animal welfare, the state created a strict permit system for those owners who were allowed to keep their already-existing pets. The statute also outlines minimal care requirements, transportation guidelines, and procedures for when a large carnivore suspected of carrying rabies bites a human or livestock.
MI - Leash - 287.262. Licensing and control of dogs; hunting dogs; female dogs in heat; straying dogs M. C. L. A. 287.262 This section of the Dog Law of 1919 provides that any dog over six months must be registered and wear a collar at all times. It also mandates that female dogs in heat must be kept on their owners' premises or restrained on a leash. The overall leash requirement is less clear, stating that it is unlawful for an owner to allow a dog "to stray unless held properly in leash." This does appear to mandate a statewide leash requirement for dogs.
MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.289a This Michigan law provides that a board of county commissioners may establish, by ordinance, an animal control agency. The animal control agency shall have jurisdiction to enforce this act in any city, village or township which does not have an animal control ordinance. The county's animal control ordinance shall provide for animal control programs, facilities, personnel and necessary expenses incurred in animal control.
MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.290 This Michigan statute enables a city, village or township to adopt an animal control ordinance to regulate the licensing, payment of claims and providing for the enforcement thereof.
MI - Dangerous - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Dangerous Animals. M. C. L. A. 287.321 - 323 This Michigan statute defines "dangerous animal," which means a dog or other animal that bites or attacks a person, or a dog that bites or attacks and causes serious injury or death to another dog while the other dog is on the property or under the control of its owner. However, a dangerous animal does not include any of the following: an animal that bites or attacks a person who is knowingly trespassing on the property of the animal's owner; an animal that bites or attacks a person who provokes or torments the animal; or an animal that is responding in a manner that an ordinary and reasonable person would conclude was designed to protect a person if that person is engaged in a lawful activity or is the subject of an assault.
MI - Livestock - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Animal Industry Act M. C. L. A. 287.701 - 747 This Michigan act is known as the "Animal Industry Act." The act is intended to protect the health, safety, and welfare of humans and animals, by requiring disease testing of imported animals, certification, and reporting of infected animals. A newly amended section (287.746) also concerns the tethering or confinement of animals such as pregnant sows and veal calves in manners that restrict lying, standing, fully extending limbs, or turning freely.
MI - Exotic Pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY; ANIMAL INDUSTRY ACT M. C. L. A. 287.731 Michigan completely prohibits the importation into the state of "any species having the potential to spread serious diseases or parasites, to cause serious physical harm, or to otherwise endanger native wildlife, human life, livestock, domestic animals, or property." For other wild or exotic animals, Michigan regulates various aspects of their importation, such as requiring physical exams by vets, negative disease tests, and proper animal care and restraint.
MI - Ferrets - Chapter 287. Ferrets M. C. L. A. 287.891 - 901 This chapter concerns ownership of ferrets in Michigan. A person shall not own or harbor a ferret over 12 weeks of age unless the ferret has a current vaccination against rabies with an approved rabies vaccine. A person may engage in hobby breeding of ferrets provided all requirements are met under Section 287.893. A person shall not release a ferret into the wild or abandon a ferret.
MI - Endangered - Part 365. Endangered Species Protection M. C. L. A. 324.36501 - 07 The state of Michigan defines an endangered species as "any fish, plant life, or wildlife that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant part of its range, other than a species of insecta determined by the department or the Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior to constitute a pest whose protection under this part would present an overwhelming and overriding risk to humans." Violation of the taking provision constitutes a misdemeanor punishable up to 90-days in jail and/or up to $1,0000 in fines.
MI - Wildlife Conservation -Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M. C. L. A. 324.41101 - 41105 These sections describe the regulatory powers of the Department of Natural Resources in issuing conservation orders protecting fish, game, and birds.
MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M. C. L. A. 324.41701 - 41712 These sections set out the guidelines for private shooting preserves, including the species of wild animals and birds permitted to be hunted.
MI - Lost Property - Chapter 434. Lost and Unclaimed Property. Lost Property. M. C. L. A. 434.21 - 29 This section comprises Michigan's Lost Property statutes.
MI - Domestic Violence - 600.2950. Personal protection orders; current or former M. C. L. A. 600.2950 This Michigan law relates to an action for a personal protection order to restrain/enjoin several categories of individuals: (1) a spouse or former spouse; (2) a person with whom the petitioner has a child in common; (3) a person in a dating relationship with petitioner; or (4) an individual who resided or is residing in the same household as the petitioner. Effective August 1, 2016, the order may now restrain or enjoin those mentioned individuals from engaging in the following actions if that person has the intent to cause the petitioner mental distress or to exert control over the petitioner with respect to an animal in which the petitioner has an ownership interest (subsection (1)(k)): (1) injuring, killing, torturing, neglecting, or threatening to injure, kill, torture, or neglect the animal; (2) removing the animal from the petitioner's possession; or (3) retaining or obtaining possession of the animal. Section 29 describes the criteria under which a petitioner is deemed to have an ownership interest in an animal.
MI - Pet Trusts - Chapter 700. Estates and Protected Individuals Code. Estates and Protected Individuals Code. M. C. L. A. 700.2722 This Michigan statute provides that a trust for the care of a designated domestic or pet animal is valid (these trusts follow the terms for non-charitable trusts and thus, can be of a duration of up to 21 years). The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust. Extrinsic evidence is admissible to prove the transferor's intent and the court may reduce the amount of the property transferred if it determines that that amount substantially exceeds the amount required for the intended use.
MI - Cruelty - 712A.18l. Juveniles, guilty of cruelty to animals or arson; court ordered psychiatric or psychological treatment M. C. L. A. 712A.18l This statute provides that if a juvenile is found to be within the court's jurisdiction for an offense that, if committed by an adult, would be a violation of the Michigan penal code relating to either cruelty to animals or arson, the court shall order that the juvenile be evaluated to determine if he or she needs psychiatric or psychological treatment. If the court determines that psychiatric or psychological treatment is appropriate, the court may order that treatment in addition to any other treatments or penalties allowed by law.
MI - Hunting, Internet - 750.236a. Engaging in, providing or operating facilities for, or providing or offering to provide equipment M. C. L. A. 750.236a, 236b, 236c A person in Michigan is not allowed to: (1) engage in computer-assisted shooting; provide or operate, with or without remuneration, facilities for computer-assisted shooting; or (3) provide or offer to provide, with or without remuneration, equipment specially adapted for computer-assisted shooting. Violation is a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.
MI - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes (MCL 750.49 - 70) M. C. L. A. 750.49 - 70a; M.C.L.A. 750.158 The Michigan Legislature has designed three primary provisions related to cruelty to animals: intentional infliction of pain and suffering, duty to provide care, and anti-animal fighting. The intentional infliction of pain and suffering provision carries the most severe penalties for animal cruelty and a violation is automatically a felony. A violation of the duty to provide care provision is initially a misdemeanor, which becomes a felony for a second or subsequent violation. A violation of the anti-animal fighting provision is either a misdemeanor or a felony, depending on the severity of conduct related to fighting. The provision does not apply to the lawful killing of livestock or customary animal husbandry of livestock, or lawful fishing, hunting, trapping, wildlife control, pest or rodent control, and animal research.
MI - Cruelty - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. M. C. L. A. 750.51 This Michigan law provides that no railroad company shall permit the confinement of animals in railroad cars for longer than 36 consecutive hours without unloading for rest, water, and feeding of at least 5 consecutive hours unless prevented by a storm, or other "accidental causes." Any company, owner or custodian of such animals, who does not comply with the provisions of this section, can be fined between $100 and $500 for each and every such offense. However, when animals are carried in cars where they have proper food, water, space and opportunity for rest, the provisions of this section that require unloading do not apply.
MI - Dog Bite - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M. C. L. A. 750.66a This Michigan law, which became effective January of 2009, provides that a person 18 years of age or older who is responsible for controlling the actions of a dog or wolf-dog cross and the person knows or has reason to know that the dog or wolf-dog cross has bitten another person shall remain on the scene. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.
MI - Cruelty - 752.91. Sale of dyed or artificially colored baby chicks, rabbits or ducklings M. C. L. A. 752.91 - 92 This law makes it unlawful for any person, firm or corporation to sell, or offer for sale, any baby chicks, rabbits, ducklings, or other fowl or game which have been dyed or otherwise artificially colored. Violation is a misdemeanor.
MI - Enforcement - Chapters 760 to 777 Code of Criminal Procedure. M. C. L. A. 764.16 This law authorizes private citizens to make arrests.
MI - Ordinances - Chapters 81 to 113 Fourth Class Cities. M. C. L. A. 91.1 This Michigan statute provides that a city incorporated under the provisions of this act has, and the council may pass ordinances relating to, the following general powers: To provide for the issuing of licenses to the owners and keepers of dogs and to require the owners and keepers of dogs to pay for and obtain such licenses; and to regulate and prevent the running at large of dogs, to require dogs to be muzzled, and to authorize the killing of dogs running at large or not licensed in violation of an ordinance of the city.
MI - Constitutional Provisions - Protection of Natural Resources M. C. L. A. Const. Art. 4, § 52 This section declares the protection, conservation, and development of the state's natural resources to be of paramount public concern and the legislature shall provide for the protection of the air, water and other natural resources of the state from pollution, impairment and destruction.
MI - Constitutional Provisions - Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund M. C. L. A. Const. Art. 9, § 35 The trust fund consists of all bonuses, rentals and royalties collected or reserved by the state under provisions of leases for the extraction of nonrenewable resources from state owned lands.
MN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws M. S. A. 35.67 - 71; 97A.321, 97B.001 - 621; 135A.191; 325F.79-792; 346.01-58; 347.01-56; 365.10; 366.01; § 609.226 These statutes comprise Minnesota's relevant dog laws. Among the provisions include several laws related to natural resources protection and hunting with dogs, the sale of dogs, and laws related to damage done by dogs.
MN - Habitat - Minnesota Environmental Rights Act (Chapter 116B. Environmental Rights) M. S. A. § 116B.01 - 13 Minnesota protects the environment under the Minnesota Environmental Rights Act (MERA). Under MERA, citizens may bring suits for civil remedies where activities are interfering with their enjoyment of natural resources, including eagle nesting sites. The law provides a comprehensive scheme under which anyone with sufficient interest in protecting land, water, air, or any natural resources may bring suit to enjoin an action.
MN - Restaurants - 157.175. Dogs; outdoor food and beverage service establishments M. S. A. § 157.175 This Minnesota law allows a statutory or home rule charter city to adopt an ordinance permitting food and beverage service establishments to allow dogs to accompany persons patronizing designated outdoor areas. The law describes the permitting process that establishments must first undergo. At a minimum, the ordinance must include the following five requirements, which must be posted conspicuously on a sign at the premises: (1) employees must be prohibited from touching, petting, or otherwise handling dogs; (2) employees and patrons must not allow dogs to come into contact with serving dishes, utensils, tableware, linens, paper products, or any other items involved in food service operations; (3) patrons must keep their dogs on a leash at all times and must keep their dogs under reasonable control; (4) dogs must not be allowed on chairs, tables, or other furnishings; and (5) dog waste must be cleaned immediately and the area sanitized.
MN - Meat - Chapter 31. Food. Meats, Generally M. S. A. § 31.60 - 31.65 This Minnesota chapter deals with sale and processing of meat in the state. Among the provisions include a prohibition on the sale of veal when calves are killed when less than four weeks old; the sale of horse meat for human consumption unless conspicuous notices are provided; and the sale of unwholesome game or poultry. The chapter also creates a Meat Industry Division in the Department of Agriculture who enforces and administers these laws.
MN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes M. S. A. § 343.01 - 40; 609.294; 609.596 - 597 These Minnesota statute comprise the anti-cruelty laws in the state. This section first allows the formation of private prevention of cruelty to animals societies and humane societies and sets forth their obligations by law. "Animal" is defined by this section as every living creature except members of the human race. No person shall overdrive, overload, torture, cruelly beat, neglect, or unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill any animal, or cruelly work any animal when it is unfit for labor. Under the neglect component, the statute states that no person shall deprive any animal over which the person has charge or control of necessary food, water, or shelter, among other things.
MN - Exotic pet - 346.155. Possessing regulated animals M. S. A. § 346.155 This Minnesota law defines "regulated animal" to mean all members of the Felidae family except the domestic cat, bears, and all non-human primates. Unless a person possessed a regulated animal on or before January 1, 2005, and came into compliance with AWA regulations, possession of the above-mentioned regulated animals is unlawful. A person who lawfully possessed a regulated animal before that date, must comply with registration, microchipping, fee, and inspection requirements.

Pages