Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
SD - Trap - 41-8-28. Trap robbing or injury as misdemeanor S D C L § 41-8-28 This South Dakota law provides that any person who steals, damages or destroys a trap of another, or who steals, damages, or destroys animals, animal carcasses, or the pelts thereof, held fast by such traps, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.
SD - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 42-11. Equine Activities. S D C L § 42-11-1 to 5 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor, equine professional, doctor of veterinary medicine or any other person, is immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, there are exceptions to this rule: a person will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant. In addition, a person will also be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.
SD - Trust - 55-1-21. Trust for care of designated animal. S D C L § 55-1-21 South Dakota's pet trust law was enacted in 2006. Amendments to the law in 2018 provide that trusts for the care of a designated animal or animals are valid.
SD - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes S D C L § 9-29-11; S D C L § 40-1-1 - 41; S D C L § 40-2-1 - 9; S D C L § 43-39-12, 12.1; SDCL § 22-22-42, 43, 44 These South Dakota statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions. "Animal," any mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, or fish, except humans. "Cruelty” means to intentionally, willfully, and maliciously inflict gross physical abuse on an animal that causes prolonged pain, that causes serious physical injury, or that results in the death of the animal. Any person who subjects an animal to cruelty is guilty of a Class 6 felony. “Neglect,” means to fail to provide food, water, protection from the elements, adequate sanitation, adequate facilities, or care generally considered to be standard and accepted for an animal's health and well-being consistent with the species, breed, physical condition, and type of animal. Any person who neglects an animal is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. Exemptions include regulated scientific experiments using live animals and the destruction of dangerous animals.
SD - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws S D C L §9-29-12; S D C L § 40-1-41; S D C L § 40-34-1 - 16; S D C L 40-12-1 - 6; S D C L § 41-6-78; § 41-8-15; S D C L § 41-15-14; S D C L § 41-17-18.1 These South Dakota statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, vicious dog laws, and rabies vaccination provisions.
Canada - Alberta - Service Dogs Act S.A. 2007, c. S-7.5 This Alberta, Canada law provides that no person shall deny to any person the accommodation, services or facilities available in any place to which the public is customarily admitted, or discriminate against any person for the reason that the person is a disabled person accompanied by a service dog or a certified dog-trainer accompanied by a dog in training. The law goes into effect January of 2009.
Canada - B.C. - B.C. Statutes - Vancouver Charter. Part XIV -- Nuisances S.B.C. 1953, c. 55, s. 323 - 324(A)3 These British Columbia, Canada laws provide the laws for preventing, abating, and prohibiting nuisances, which include dangerous dogs. The laws describe what constitutes a dangerous dog and what actions may be taken with a dangerous dog. The set also contains provisions that allow for the creation of by-laws to control and impound animals.
Canada - Manitoba Statutes. The Animal Care Act S.M. 1996, c. 69 [C.C.S.M., A84]

The Manitoba Animal Care Act sets out the requirements for animals in an owner's care. The Act allows animal protection officers to assist animals in distress. A person who contravenes any provision of this Act is guilty of an offence and is liable to a fine of not more than $5,000. for a first offence and not more than $10,000. for a subsequent offence, or to imprisonment for a term of not more than six months, or both.

Canada - Manitoba Statutes. The Animal Liability Act S.M. 1998, c. 8 [C.C.S.M., c. A95], as am. S.M. 2002, c. 24, s. 4; 2002, c. This set of laws comprises the Manitoba Animal Liability Act. Under the Act, the owner of an animal is liable for damages resulting from harm that the animal causes to a person or to property, but the damages awarded can be reduced depending upon the contributory fault or negligence of the plaintiff. In addition, no animal may run at-large under this law. Any person who finds a dog,wild boar, or prescribed animal worrying, injuring or killing livestock on the premises of the owner or possessor of the livestock that person may destroy the dog, wild boar or prescribed animal.
Canada - Nova Scotia Municipal Government Act S.N.S. 1998, c. 18, s. 174 - 179

Certain sections (ss.175-179) of this Nova Scotia statute deal with dog ownership, and the consequences for failing to control a dog, or harm to people or property.

Canada - P.E.I. Statutes - Animal Health and Protection Act S.P.E.I. 1988, c. 11, s. 1 - 20

This set of laws comprises the Prince Edward Island (PEI) Animal Health and Protection Act. The object of the Act is to promote animal health and to eradicate, prevent or control the spread of disease among animals in the province.The Act gives broad authority to inspectors in ascertaining the presence of disease. Section 8 also includes the anti-cruelty provisions of the Act.

Canada - P.E.I. Statutes - Companion Animal Protection Act S.P.E.I. 2001, c. 4, s. 1 -

This set of laws comprises the Prince Edward Island (PEI) Companion Animal Protection Act. The object of this Act is to protect companion animals from abuse and neglect and to license and regulate the activities of companion animal establishments. Under the Act, no person shall wilfully cause a companion animal unnecessary pain, suffering or injury or permit it to be in distress. Any companion animal that is at large and or appears to be in distress may be caught and taken possession of by a person who is not the owner of the companion animal. Every person who fails to comply with this Act or the regulations is guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine of not less than $200 and not more than $5,000.

Canada - Saskatchewan - Northern Municipailities Act (dangerous animal) S.S. 1983, c. N-5.1, s. 100 - 100.09

Dangerous Dog Laws for Saskatchewan's Northern Municipalities

Canada - Saskatchewan - The Animal Protection Act S.S. 1999, c. A-21.1, s. 1 - 28

This set of laws comprises the Saskatchewan Animal Protection Act. Under the Act, no person responsible for an animal shall cause or permit the animal to be or to continue to be in distress. The Act also outlines the powers of humane societies to rescue animals in distress and then sell, give away, or euthanize such animals if the owners cannot be located. A person who contravenes the Act is guilty of an offence with a fine of not more than $25,000, to imprisonment for not more than two months or to both for a first offence;  Further, in addition to any other penalty imposed, if a person responsible for an animal is found guilty, the court may make an order prohibiting that person from owning or having custody or control of any animal for a period specified by the court. Section 20 of the Act outlines the provisions relating to damage or injury done by dogs.

Canada - Saskatchewan - Dangerous Animals S.S. 2005, c. M-36.1, s. 374 - 380 This set of laws comprises the Saskatchewan, Canada dangerous animal laws. Under the Act, any person who owns an animal for the purpose of fighting, or trains, torments, badgers, baits or otherwise uses an animal for the purpose of causing or encouraging the animal to make unprovoked attacks on persons or domestic animals is guilty of an offence. In addition, a peace officer or designated officer may destroy any animal that he or she finds injuring or viciously attacking a person or a domestic animal. The Act outlines the actions that result in an animal being declared dangerous (i.e., chased a person in a vicious or threatening manner, bit a person or domestic animal without provocation, etc.) and the procedure to declare such an animal dangerous.
Brazil - Dogs and Cats - Sao Paulo State Law n. 12.916 (no kill ordinance) Sao Paulo State Law n. 12.916, concerning stray dogs and cats

Sao Paulo state becomes the first Brazilian state to enact a law banning the killing of stray dogs and cat as a population control practice. The law n. 12.916 was enacted in April 16, 2008. The law asserts that animal control agencies shall work together with non-profits and other organizations to reach the law’s objective which is the sterilization of domestic animals as a form of population control, to establish adoption centers, and to put forward adoption programs for stray animals. In addition, the animal control agencies shall promote educational programs about responsible pet ownership.

SD - Vehicle - SDCL § 41-1-12. Euthanasia of animal injured in motor vehicle accident SDCL § 41-1-12 - 13 Any person who has seriously injured a wildlife animal or who comes upon a wildlife animal that has been seriously injured in a motor vehicle accident may euthanize the animal if that person has the means, skill, and will to euthanize humanely.
SD - Lost Property - Chapter 43-41. Lost and Found Property. SDCL § 43-41-1 - 11 These statutes comprise South Dakota's lost property provisions.
NC - Initiatives - Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment Session Law 2018 - 96 This amendment would acknowledge the right to hunt, fish and harvest wildlife, and to use traditional methods to hunt, fish and harvest wildlife. The amendment does not define “traditional methods.”
Sweden - Scientific Research - Swedish Animal Welfare Ordinance SFS 1988:539

This is one of two main pieces of animal welfare legislation in Sweden. It has been edited to contain mostly material relating to animal research.

Sweden - Cruelty - The Sweden Animal Welfare Act SFS 1998:56

The Swedish Animal Welfare Act applies to the care and treatment of domestic animals, and other animals if they are kept in captivity or are used for any of the purposes referred to in section 19 (generally, scientific uses).  It provides that animals shall be treated well and shall be protected from unnecessary suffering and disease, among other things.

Canada - Newfoundland and Labrador Statutes - Animal Health and Protection Act SNL 2010, c A-9.1 This act replaces the Newfoundland and Labrador Animal Protection Act, Dog Act, Heritage Animals Act, Livestock Act, Livestock Health Act and the Poultry and Poultry Products Act. Anyone convicted of animal cruelty or neglect may face up to $50,000 in fines or six-months jail time; a person may also face a lifetime ban on owning an animal. The text consists of 82 sections divided into 10 Parts, which include: Animal health (I); Animal protection (II); Nuisance animal (III); Heritage animals (IV); Licensing (V); Regulation and fees (VI); Inspector’s power (VII); Offences and penalties (VIII); General (IX); Repeal and commencement (X).
Canada - Nova Scotia Statutes - Animal Protection Act SNS 2008, c 33

This set of laws replaces the Animal Cruelty Prevention Act. The Act outlines the establishment and powers of the Nova Scotia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In addition, the Act also provides that no person shall cause an animal to be in distress. First andsecond time violaters face up to $5,000 in fines and in default of payment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or both fine and imprisonment. A third offense would result in a fine of up to $10,000 and in default of payment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or both fine and imprisonment. The courts can also prohibit the ownership of animals and may impose a lifetime ban on owning animals.

Canada - Saskatchewan - Dangerous Dog Law SS 2005, c M-36.1, 374-380 This set of Saskatchewan, Canada laws comprises the Dangerous Dog laws.
OK - Initiative - State Question 687/Initiative Petition 365 (Ban Cockfighting) State Question 687/Initiative Petition 365 (Ban Cockfighting) This petition makes it a felony to instigate or encourage cockfighting, possess or train birds for cockfighting, or maintain a facility for cockfighting in the state of Oklahoma. The ballot proposal also makes it a misdemeanor to knowingly be a spectator at a cockfight. It passed in 2002 with 56% of the vote.
OK - Initiative - State Question No. 742 (2008) (Constitutional Right to Hunt) State Question No. 742 (2008) (Constitutional Right to Hunt) Oklahoma Question 742 would add a new section to the State Constitution. It gives all people of this state the right to hunt, trap, fish and take game and fish. Such activities would be subject to reasonable regulation. It allows the Wildlife Conservation Commission to approve methods and procedures for hunting, trapping, fishing and taking of game and fish. It allows for taking game and fish by traditional means, and makes hunting, fishing, and trapping the preferred means to manage certain game and fish. The measure was approved by a margin of 80% to 20%.
UK - Farming - UK General Welfare of Farmed Animals Regs. 2000 Statutory Instrument 2000 No. 1870

For historical purposes only. Law has been repealed and/or replaced. The UK's general animal welfare legislation affecting any animal (including fish, reptiles or amphibians) bred or kept for the production of food, wool, skin or fur or for other farming purposes.

UK - Farming - UK Welfare of Farmed Animals (Amend.) Statutory Instrument 2002 No. 1646

For historical purposes only. Law has been repealed and/or replaced. These Regulations may be cited as the Welfare of Farmed Animals (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2002. The provisions mainly concern egg-laying hens.

AU - Farming - Stock Act 1915 (QLD) Stock Act 1915

The Stock Act governs the treatment and welfare of stock or farm animals in Queensland.  The purpose of the Act is to promote responsible animal care and protection, to provide standards for animal care and use, to protect industry in the event of a disease outbreak.

EG - Animal Development - Chapter 1 on Animal Development and Protection Subchapter II, arts. 108, 109, 117, 118, 119

This chapter of laws from Egypt contains five articles that concern the treatment of animals. Among the provisions is an article that allows the Minister of Agriculture to regulate the import and export of live animals and birds. Article 119 states: "It is forbidden to exercise cruelty to animals. The Minister of Agriculture shall, by decree, specify the cases to which this ban shall apply."

Switzerland - Cruelty - Animal Protection Ordinance Minimum Requirements Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance 1981 The measurements given in Appendix 1 refer to light areas free of any obstacle. They may be reduced only by rounding of the corners or by feeding and watering appliances positioned in the corners. The measurements given between the brackets are minimum values for existing installations which existed on July 1, 1981 already and, under Article 76, do not need to be adapted.
Switzerland - Cruelty - Federal Act and Ordinance on Animal Cruelty Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance 1981

The following is one of two pieces of Swiss legislation concerning animal welfare. It is highly comprehensive and covers all aspects of animal welfare including but not limited to scientific research, farming, treatment of pets, national and international animal sales. This Act clearly states that no one shall unjustifiably expose animals to pain, suffering, physical injury or fear. Regulations on Animal Welfare based on the Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection. This piece of legislation is comprehensive, including laws on animal husbandry, animal research, companion animals, breeding, transport and slaughter.

Switzerland - Cruelty - Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance Swiss Animal Protection Ordinance 1981

Regulations on Animal Welfare based on the Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection. This piece of legislation is comprehensive, including laws on animal husbandry, animal research, companion animals, breeding, transport and slaughter.

Switzerland - Cruelty - Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection of March 9, 1978 Swiss APA 1978

The following is one of two pieces of Swiss legislation concerning animal welfare. It is highly comprehensive and covers all aspects of animal welfare including but not limited to scientific research, farming, treatment of pets, national and international animal sales. This Act clearly states that no one shall unjustifiably expose animals to pain, suffering, physical injury or fear.

TN - Expert - § 29-26-115. Burden of proof; expert witnesses T. C. A. § 29-26-115 This Tennessee statute provides the requirements for the claimant's burden of proof under malpractice actions, including, inter alia, the proof that the defendant's actions fell below the recognized standard of acceptable professional practice in the community, proximate cause, and proof by a preponderance of the evidence that defendant's actions were negligent.
TN - Vehicle - § 29-34-209. Forcible entry of a motor vehicle for purposes of removing a minor or an animal T. C. A. § 29-34-209 This statute grants a person who forcibly breaks into a motor vehicle to save a minor or animal immunity from civil liability.
TN - Trusts - § 35-15-408. Trust for care of animal. T. C. A. § 35-15-408 This Tennessee trust law, amended in 2007, provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one (1) animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal. The trust may not be enforced for more than 90 years.
TN - Domestic Violence - Part 6 Domestic Abuse T. C. A. § 36-3-601 - 606 Under Tennessee's Domestic Abuse Act, the definition section states that "abuse" includes inflicting, or attempting to inflict, physical injury on any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by an adult or minor. Section 606(9) allows the court to direct the care, custody, or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either party or a minor residing in the household. Further, in no instance shall the animal be placed in the care, custody, or control of the respondent, but shall instead be placed in the care, custody or control of the petitioner or in an appropriate animal foster situation.
TN - Cruelty, reporting - Part 4. Cross Reporting of Animal Cruelty T. C. A. § 38-1-401 - 403 This Tennessee statute requires employees of child or adult protective service agencies to report animal cruelty, abuse, or neglect that they know or reasonably suspect to have occurred in their county. The statute also describes the amount of time that an employee may have to make a report and ensures the confidentiality of the employee. The statute also makes clear that it does not impose a duty on the employee to investigate known or reasonably suspected animal cruelty, abuse, or neglect.
TN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes T. C. A. § 39-14-201 to 218; T. C. A. § 40-39-101 - 104 These Tennessee anti-cruelty provisions define "animal" as a domesticated living creature or a wild creature previously captured. A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals (a Class A misdemeanor) if he or she intentionally or knowingly tortures, maims or grossly overworks an animal; fails unreasonably to provide necessary food, water, care or shelter for an animal in the person's custody; abandons unreasonably an animal in the person's custody; transports or confines an animal in a cruel manner; or inflicts burns, cuts, lacerations, or other injuries or pain. Animal fighting is also prohibited under this section, with dog fighting incurring a felony penalty and cockfighting resulting in a misdemeanor in most cases. A person commits aggravated cruelty (a Class E felony) to animals when, with aggravated cruelty and with no justifiable purpose, he or she intentionally kills or intentionally causes serious physical injury to a companion animal. Exclusions include animal farming, research, veterinary practices, hunting, trapping, "dispatching" rabid animals or wild animals on one's property, among other things.
TN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws T. C. A. § 39-14-208, 212, 216; § 39-16-304; § 44-17-403, 404; § 55-8-180; § 62-7-112; § 66-7-104, 106; 111; § 66-28-505 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
TN - Ecoterrorism - Part 8. Farm Animal and Research Facilities Protection T. C. A. § 39-14-801 - 806 This chapter comprises the Tennessee Farm Animal and Research Facilities Protection Act. A person commits an offense if, without consent, the person exercises control over an animal facility, an animal from an animal facility, or other property from an animal facility with the intent to deprive the owner of the facility, animal, or property and to disrupt the enterprise conducted at the animal facility. Other offenses include destruction of property, including freeing of animals located there, or entering an animal facility with the intent to disrupt or damage the enterprise or its property. A violation is a Class C felony if the person exercises control over the facility or the damage is $500 or more. A violation is a Class B misdemeanor if the damage is less than $500 or the person illegally enters the facility with intent to damage it. Any person who has been damaged by reason of a violation of this part may recover all actual and consequential damages, punitive damages, and court costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, from the person causing the damage.
TN - Dangerous Animals - § 39-17-101. Dangerous snakes or reptiles; handling T. C. A. § 39-17-101 This Tennessee law makes it an offense for a person to display, exhibit, handle, or use a poisonous or dangerous snake or reptile in a manner that endangers the life or health of any person. Violation is a Class C misdemeanor.
TN - Dog, dangerous, felon - § 39-17-1363. Violent felony conviction; custody or control of dogs; application T. C. A. § 39-17-1363 Under this Tennessee law, it is an offense for any person convicted of a violent felony to knowingly own, possess, have custody or control of a potentially vicious dog or a vicious dog for a period of ten years after such person has been released from custody following completion of sentence. Additionally, it is an offense for any convicted violent felon to own or have custody of a dog that is not microchipped or spayed/neutered. This section shall only apply if a person's conviction for a violent felony occurs on or after July 1, 2010.
TN - State animal - § 4-1-337. Official state pet T. C. A. § 4-1-337 In 2014, Tennessee enacted a law that makes dogs and cats adopted from Tennessee animal shelters and rescues the official state pet.
TN - Dangerous dog - § 44-17-120. Death or serious injury; destruction of dogs T. C. A. § 44-17-120 This Tennessee statute provides that any dog which attacks a human and causes death or serious injury may be destroyed upon the order of the circuit court where the attack occurred. The owner shall be given notice that if he or she does not appear before the court within five days and show cause why the dog should not be destroyed, then the order shall issue and the dog shall be destroyed. This statute also allows certain counties to make ordinances to petition a general sessions court to provide for the disposition of dangerous dogs and/or dogs causing death or serious injury to humans or other animals.
TN - Ordinances - § 44-17-401. Use of electronic locating collars on dogs T. C. A. § 44-17-401 This Tennessee statute provides that no agency or entity of state or local government shall enact, adopt, promulgate, or enforce any law, ordinance, rule, regulation, or other policy which restricts or prevents the owner of any dog from using an electronic locating collar to protect such dog from loss.
TN - Pet Damages - § 44-17-403. Liability for death of pet; damages; exemptions T. C. A. § 44-17-403 This Tennessee statute provides that a pet owner may seek non-economic damages up to $5,000 for the death of his or her pet against the person who is liable for causing the death or injuries that led to the animal's death. The person causing the pet's death must have done so intentionally or, if negligently, the incident must have occurred either on the owner or pet caretaker's property or while in the control and supervision of the caretaker. These damages are not for the intentional infliction of emotional distress of the owner or other civil claim, but rather for the direct loss of "reasonably expected society, companionship, love and affection of the pet."
TN - Breeder -Part 7. Commercial Breeder Act T. C. A. § 44-17-701 - 715 (expired June 30, 2014) (Expired June 30, 2014). In 2009, Tennessee enacted its Commercial Breeder Act. The act defines a commercial breeder as means any person who possesses or maintains, under the person’s immediate control, twenty (20) or more unsterilized adult female dogs or cats in this state for the purpose of selling the offspring as companion animals. Commercial breeders must maintain and display licenses to operate in accordance with the act. Further, the act requires commercial breeders to keep on file at all times the number of dogs and cats in their possession and how many were sold during the reporting period. Inspections may occur under the act, but are not mandatory.
TN - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 20. Equine Activities--Liability T. C. A. § 44-20-101 to 105 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or equine professional, or any other person, including corporations and partnerships, are immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, there are exceptions to this rule: a person, corporation, or partnership will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant. In addition, a person will be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.

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