Displaying 91 - 100 of 100
Titlesort descending Summary
WA - Trade - 77.15.260. Unlawful trafficking in fish, shellfish, or wildlife--Penalty

This Washington statute pertains to unlawful trafficking in fish, shellfish, and wildlife. A person is guilty of unlawful trafficking in the second degree if s/he traffics in such animals with a wholesale value of less than $250 and the animals are unclassified or classified as game, food fish, shellfish, game fish, or protected wildlife. Unlawful trafficking in the first degree occurs when the animals have a value of $250 or more or the animals are classified as endangered or deleterious exotic wildlife.


These Washington statutes pertain to trespassing animals. They provide for liability of owners for damage caused by such animals.There are also notification requirements to owners of trespassing animals.

WA - Trusts - Chapter 11.118. Trusts--Animals
The purpose of this chapter is to recognize and validate certain trusts that are established for the benefit of animals (nonhuman animal with vertebrae).  The trust can be for one or more animals provided they are individually identified or labeled in the instrument so that they may be easily identified.  Unless otherwise provided in the trust instrument or in this chapter, the trust will terminate when no animal that is designated as a beneficiary of the trust remains living. 
WA - Vehicle - 46.61.660. Carrying persons or animals on outside part of vehicle This Washington law states that it is illegal to transport any living animal on the running board, fenders, hood, or other outside part of any vehicle unless suitable harness, cage or enclosure is provided that protects the animal from being thrown.
WA - Veterinary - Chapter 18.92. Veterinary Medicine, Surgery, and Dentistry.

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

WA - Wildlife - 77.15.790. Negligently feeding, attempting to feed, or attracting large wild carnivores to land or a building--I

These two Washington laws deal with the unauthorized feeding of large wild carnivores. A person may not negligently feed or attempt to feed large wild carnivores or negligently attract large wild carnivores to land or a building. If a person who is issued a written warning fails to contain, move, or remove the food, food waste, or other substance as directed, the person commits an infraction under chapter 7.84 RCW.

WA - Wolf - Chapter 16.001. Wolf-Livestock Management These statutes create the northeast Washington wolf-livestock management grant within the department of agriculture. Further, a four-member advisory board is established to advise the department on the expenditure of the northeast Washington wolf-livestock management grant funds. The board must help direct funding for the deployment of nonlethal deterrence resources, including human presence, and locally owned and deliberately located equipment and tools. In addition, the northeast Washington wolf-livestock management account is created as a nonappropriated account in the custody of the state treasurer.
WA - Yakima - Breed - Chapter 6.18 - Pit Bull Dogs

This Yakima, Washington ordinance makes it unlawful to keep, or harbor, own or in any way possess a pit bull dog within the city of Yakima. Violation of this section is a gross misdemeanor. This chapter does not apply to pit bull dogs which: 1) do not reside in the city of Yakima, 2) are brought into the city for the purposes of participating in a dog show or canine sporting event for which the owner is able to show proof of entry, and 3) do not remain in the city of Yakima for a period exceeding ninety-six consecutive hours.

Williams v. McMahan

The plaintiff sued for damages as a result of the wrongful spaying of her purebred dog, which she intended to breed. The court found that damages should be measured by the fair market value of the dog.

Womack v. Von Rardon

In this Washington case, a cat owner sued a minor and his parents after the minor set her cat on fire.  While this Court found that the trial court correctly granted summary judgment with respect to Ms. Womack's private nuisance, tort outrage, and statutory waste claims, it held that the lower court incorrectly calculated the measure of damages.  Noting that the Division 2 Appellate Court left open the question of emotional distress damages where a pet has been


injured in

Pickford v. Masion

, 124 Wash.App. 257, 262-63, 98 P.3d 1232 (2004), this Court held that the general allegations include sufficient facts to find both malicious conduct toward Ms. Womack's pet and her resulting emotional distress.  Thus, "[f]or the first time in Washington, we hold malicious injury to a pet can support a claim for, and be considered a factor in measuring a person's emotional distress damages."