New York

Displaying 101 - 110 of 204
Titlesort descending Summary
NY - Ecoterrorism - § 378. Unlawful tampering with animal research This New York law comprises the state's ecoterrorism provision. A person who has been given "notice," as defined by the law, is guilty of the crime of "unlawful tampering with animal research" if he or she: (1) knowingly or intentionally releases an animal from a facility or causes the abandonment of an animal knowing that such animal was exposed to infectious agents prior to such release or abandonment and was capable of transmitting such infectious agents to humans; or (2) with intent to do so, causes loss or damage to secret scientific material, and having no right to do so nor any reasonable ground to believe that he has such right, causes loss of or damage to any secret scientific material in an amount in excess of two hundred fifty dollars at a facility.
NY - Education - § 809. Instruction in the humane treatment of animals This New York law requires those officers, boards or commissions authorized or required to prescribe courses of instruction that receive public funding to establish a humane education curriculum as described. Additionally, the law states that any school that uses animal for study must provide: (1) appropriate quarters; (2) sufficient space for the normal behavior and postural requirements of the species; (3) proper ventilation, lighting, and temperature control; (4) adequate food and clean drinking water; and (5) quarters which shall be cleaned on a regular basis and located in an area where undue stress and disturbance are minimized. With regard to dissection, the law allows any student who expresses a moral or religious objection to performing or witnessing the dissection of an animal to be provided the opportunity to undertake an alternative project. This request by the student must be substantiated in writing by the student's parent or legal guardian. Students who decline dissection are not to be penalized under the law and parents and students must be notified about their rights under this law. Finally, the law prohibits certain experimentation on live vertebrate animals.
NY - Endangered Species - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws.


The New York code for endangered species defines endangered species as any species which meets one of the following criteria:  native species in imminent danger of extirpation or extinction in New York; or species listed as endangered by the United States Department of the Interior in the Code of Federal Regulations (50 CFR part 17).

NY - Endangered Species - Part 182. Endangered and Threatened Species of Fish and Wildlife


This set of New York regulations concerns endangered, threatened, and species of special concern. Section 182.5 provides a list of native species listed as endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Under Section 182.7, the department may issue a license to a person to transport, sell, import and/or possess a listed species for purposes it deems legitimate.

NY - Enforcement - Agriculture and Markets Law - Article 3. Investigation; Practice and Procedure; Violations; Penalties.


This article outlines the procedures and penalties for violations of New York's Agriculture and Markets Law.

NY - Enforcement, Conservation - Article 71. Enforcement.


This set of statutes outlines the procedures and penalties for violations of New York's Environmental Conservation Law.

NY - Equine Activity - Article18-B. Safety in Agricultural Tourism This 2017 New York set of laws is known as the “safety in agricultural tourism act." The activities defined as agricultural tourism are broad, and include equine therapy, u-pick Christmas trees, touring farms, and hunting on farms. The act requires that operators of agricultural tourism areas post at every point of sale or distribution of tickets a conspicuous “Warning to Visitors” relative to the inherent risks of participating in activities on working farms and to provide written information based on requirements from the commissioner of agriculture. Owners and operators of agricultural tourism areas shall not be liable for an injury to or death of a visitor if the provisions of this subdivision are complied with
NY - Exotic - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws.


This New York laws begin by stating that wild game and other wildlife may only be possessed if lawfully taken in compliance with the Fish and Wildlife Law and the accompanying regulations. Skunk, bobcat, mink, raccoon and muskrat may be bought and sold alive during their respective open seasons. No live wolf, coyote, coydog, fox, skunk, venomous reptile or raccoon shall be possessed or transported, except under a license or permit issued by the department. Every such license or permit shall contain a prominent notice warning the licensee or permittee of his or her duty to exercise due care in safeguarding the public from attack; failure to do so is a crime under section three hundred seventy of the agriculture and markets law.

NY - Exotic - Chapter 43-B. Of the Consolidated Laws.

This set of New York statutes provides some of the state's fish and wildlife laws. Among the provisions include a prohibition against interference with wildlife, restriction on the possession and importation of certain wildlife such as wolves, wolfdogs, coyotes, coydogs, foxes, skunks, and venomous reptiles, and laws that allows individuals to take destructive wildlife. No person shall knowingly possess, harbor, sell, barter, transfer, exchange or import any wild animal for use as a pet in New York state, except that any person who possessed a wild animal for use as a pet at the time that this section went effect may retain possession of such animal for the remainder of its life.

NY - Exotic Pets - Chapter 69 Of the Consolidated Laws. This New York law provides that any person who owns or possesses a wild animal or reptile capable of inflicting bodily harm upon a human being, who fails to exercise due care in safeguarding the public from attack by such wild animal or reptile, is guilty of a misdemeanor. The punishment for violation is imprisonment for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars, or by both. The second part of the law imposes strict liability upon owners of dangerous wild animals.

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