Full Statute Name:  Mckinney's Consolidated Laws of New York. Chapter Eighteen. Article 2-B. State and Local Natural and Man-Made Disaster Preparedness. Agriculture and Markets Law. Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws.

Share |
Primary Citation:  McKinney's Executive Law § 22, 23; McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 410; McKinney's Public Authorities Law § 1264-a; McK.Unconsol.Laws § 6408-e Country of Origin:  United States Last Checked:  February, 2019 Alternate Citation:  NY EXEC § 22, 23; NY AGRI & MKTS § 410
Summary:

In New York, disaster emergency plans must include utilization and coordination of programs to assist individuals with household pets and service animals. Particular emphasis must be on evacuation, shelter and transportation options following a disaster.

Chapter Eighteen. Article 2-B. State and Local Natural and Man-Made Disaster Preparedness.

§ 22 . State disaster preparedness plans

§ 23 . Local comprehensive emergency management plans

Agriculture and Markets Law. Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. Article 26-B. Animal Response Teams.

§ 410 . Establishment of animal response teams

McKinney's Consolidated Laws of New York Annotated. Public Authorities Law. Chapter 43-a. Of the Consolidated Laws. Article 5. Public Utility Authorities. Title 11. Metropolitan Transportation Authority

§ 1264-a. State of emergency; boarding of a commuter transportation by domestic companion animals

McKinney's Consolidated Laws of New York Annotated. Unconsolidated Laws. Title 17. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Chapter 1. Compact Between New York and New Jersey Creating Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

§ 6408-e. Emergency evacuation; boarding of public transportation or public transportation service with domestic companion animal

 

Chapter Eighteen. Article 2-B. State and Local Natural and Man-Made Disaster Preparedness.

§ 22. State disaster preparedness plans

1. The commission shall prepare a state disaster preparedness plan and submit such plan to the governor for approval no later than one year following the effective date of this act. The governor shall act upon such plan by July first of that year. The commission shall review such plans annually.

2. The purpose of such plans shall be to minimize the effects of disasters by: (i) identifying appropriate measures to prevent disasters, (ii) developing mechanisms to coordinate the use of resources and manpower for service during and after disaster emergencies and the delivery of services to aid citizens and reduce human suffering resulting from a disaster, and (iii) provide for recovery and redevelopment after disaster emergencies.

3. Such plans shall be prepared with such assistance from other agencies as the commission deems necessary, and shall include, but not be limited to:

a. Disaster prevention and mitigation. Plans to prevent and minimize the effects of disasters shall include, but not be limited to:

(1) identification of hazards and assessment of risk;

(2) recommended disaster prevention and mitigation projects, policies, priorities and programs, with suggested implementation schedules, which outline federal, state and local roles;

(3) suggested revisions and additions to building and safety codes, and zoning and other land use programs;

(4) suggested ways in which state agencies can provide technical assistance to municipalities in the development of local disaster prevention and mitigation plans and programs;

(5) such other measures as reasonably can be taken to protect lives, prevent disasters, and reduce the impact of disasters.

b. Disaster response. Plans to coordinate the use of resources and manpower for service during and after disaster emergencies and to deliver services to aid citizens and reduce human suffering resulting from a disaster emergency shall include, but not be limited to:

(1) coordination of resources, manpower and services, using recognized practices in incident management and utilizing existing organizations and lines of authority and centralized direction of requests for assistance;

(2) the location, procurement, construction, processing, transportation, storing, maintenance, renovation, distribution, disposal or use of materials, including those donated, and facilities and services;

(3) a system for warning populations who are or may be endangered;

(4) arrangements for activating state, municipal and volunteer forces, through normal chains of command so far as possible and for continued communication and reporting;

(5) a specific plan for rapid and efficient communication, and for the integration of state communication facilities during a state disaster emergency, including the assignment of responsibilities and the establishment of communication priorities, and liaison with municipal, private and federal communication facilities;

(6) a plan for coordinated evacuation procedures, including the establishment of temporary housing and other necessary facilities;

(7) criteria for establishing priorities with respect to the restoration of vital services and debris removal;

(8) plans for the continued effective operation of the civil and criminal justice systems;

(9) provisions for training state and local government personnel and volunteers in disaster response operations;

(10) providing information to the public;

(11) care for the injured and needy and identification and disposition of the dead;

(12) utilization and coordination of programs to assist victims of disasters, with particular attention to the needs of the poor, the elderly, individuals with disabilities and other groups which may be especially affected;

(13) control of ingress and egress to and from a disaster area;

(14) arrangements to administer federal disaster assistance;

(15) a system for obtaining and coordinating situational awareness including the centralized assessment of disaster effects and resultant needs; and

(16) utilization and coordination of programs to assist individuals with household pets and service animals following a disaster, with particular attention to means of evacuation, shelter and transportation options.

c. Recovery. Plans to provide for recovery and redevelopment after disaster emergencies shall include, but not be limited to:

(1) measures to coordinate state agency assistance in recovery efforts;

(2) arrangements to administer federal recovery assistance; and

(3) such other measures as reasonably can be taken to assist in the development and implementation of local disaster recovery plans.

Credits

(Added L.1978, c. 640, § 3, eff. April 1, 1979. Amended L.2004, c. 42, § 2, eff. April 20, 2004; L.2006, c. 677, § 2, eff. Jan. 1, 2007; L.2010, c. 56, pt. B, § 3, eff. July 1, 2010.)

Current through L.2011, chapters 1 to 54, 58, 63 to 96 and 98 to 108.

 

§ 23. Local comprehensive emergency management plans

1. Each county, except those contained within the city of New York, and each city with a population of one million or more, shall prepare a comprehensive emergency management plan. Each city with a population of less than one million, town and village is authorized to prepare a comprehensive emergency management plan. The disaster preparedness commission shall provide assistance and advice for the development of such plans. Each city with a population of less than one million, town and village plan shall be coordinated with the county plan.

2. The purpose of such plans shall be to minimize the effect of disasters by (i) identifying appropriate local measures to prevent disasters, (ii) developing mechanisms to coordinate the use of local resources and manpower for service during and after disasters and the delivery of services to aid citizens and reduce human suffering resulting from a disaster, and (iii) providing for recovery and redevelopment after disasters.

3. Plans for coordination of resources, manpower and services shall provide for a centralized coordination and direction of requests for assistance.

4. Plans for coordination of assistance shall provide for utilization of existing organizations and lines of authority.

5. In preparing such plans, cooperation, advice and assistance shall be sought from local government officials, regional and local planning agencies, police agencies, fire departments and fire companies, local emergency management agencies, commercial and volunteer ambulance services, health and social services officials, community action agencies, the chief administrator of the courts, organizations for the elderly and the handicapped, agencies and organizations that provide home health care services, agencies and organizations that provide hospice services, other interested groups and the general public. Such advice and assistance may be obtained through public hearings held on public notice, or through other appropriate and practical methods, through which such aforementioned groups may offer their input for consideration on issues that support the effective preparation and execution of the plan. In addition, in the case of home care and hospice, such input may address procedures by which such providers may be granted essential access to care for such patients during an emergency.

6. All plans for comprehensive emergency management developed by local governments or any revisions thereto shall be submitted to the commission by December thirty-first of each year to facilitate state coordination of disaster operations.

7. Such plans shall include, but not be limited to:

a. Disaster prevention and mitigation. Plans to prevent and minimize the effects of disasters shall include, but not be limited to:

(1) identification of hazards and assessment of risk;

(2) recommended disaster prevention and mitigation projects, policies, priorities and programs, with suggested implementation schedules, which outline federal, state and local roles;

(3) suggested revisions and additions to building and safety codes and zoning and other land use programs;

(4) such other measures as reasonably can be taken to protect lives, prevent disasters, and reduce their impact.

b. Disaster response. Plans to coordinate the use of resources and manpower for service during and after disasters and to deliver services to aid citizens and reduce human suffering resulting from a disaster shall include, but not be limited to:

(1) coordination of resources, manpower and services, using recognized practices in incident management, utilizing existing organizations and lines of authority and centralized direction of requests for assistance;

(2) the location, procurement, construction, processing, transportation, storing, maintenance, renovation, distribution, disposal or use of materials, including those donated, and facilities and services which may be required in time of disaster;

(3) a system for warning populations who are or may be endangered;

(4) arrangements for activating municipal and volunteer forces, through normal chains of command so far as possible, and for continued communication and reporting;

(5) a specific plan for rapid and efficient communication and for the integration of local communication facilities during a disaster including the assignment of responsibilities and the establishment of communication priorities and liaison with municipal, private, state and federal communication facilities;

(6) a plan for coordination evacuation procedures including the establishment of temporary housing and other necessary facilities;

(7) criteria for establishing priorities with respect to the restoration of vital services and debris removal;

(8) plans for the continued effective operation of the civil and criminal justice systems;

(9) provisions for training local government personnel and volunteers in disaster response operations;

(10) providing information to the public;

(11) care for the injured and needy and identification and disposition of the dead;

(12) utilization and coordination of programs to assist victims of disasters, with particular attention to the needs of the poor, the elderly, individuals with disabilities and other groups which may be especially affected;

(13) control of ingress and egress to and from a disaster area;

(14) arrangements to administer state and federal disaster assistance;

(15) procedures under which the county, city, town, village or other political subdivision and emergency organization personnel and resources will be used in the event of a disaster;

(16) a system for obtaining and coordinating disaster information including the centralized assessment of local disaster effects and resultant needs;

(17) continued operation of governments of political subdivisions; and

(18) utilization and coordination of programs to assist individuals with household pets and service animals following a disaster, with particular attention to means of evacuation, shelter and transportation options.

c. Recovery. Local plans to provide for recovery and redevelopment after disasters shall include, but not be limited to:

(1) recommendations for replacement, reconstruction, removal or relocation of damaged or destroyed public or private facilities, proposed new or amendments to zoning, subdivision, building, sanitary or fire prevention regulations and recommendations for economic development and community development in order to minimize the impact of any potential future disasters on the community.

(2) provision for cooperation with state and federal agencies in recovery efforts.

(3) provisions for training and educating local disaster officials or organizations in the preparation of applications for federal and state disaster recovery assistance.

Credits
(Added L.1978, c. 640, § 3, eff. April 1, 1979. Amended L.1993, c. 603, § 1; L.2004, c. 42, §§ 3, 4, eff. April 20, 2004; L.2006, c. 677, § 3, eff. Jan. 1, 2007; L.2010, c. 56, pt. B, § 4, eff. July 1, 2010; L.2017, c. 385, § 1, eff. Oct. 23, 2017.)

 

Agriculture and Markets Law. Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. Article 26-B. Animal Response Teams.

§ 410. Establishment of animal response teams

1. The commissioner is hereby authorized to establish state and county animal response teams to support the prevention of, preparedness for, response to, and recovery from emergencies and disasters affecting animals in New York state. The commissioner may appoint qualified volunteers to such teams which may include appropriate state agency and specialty personnel and such other personnel and volunteers he or she deems appropriate. For purposes of this section, “qualified volunteer” shall mean a person who does not receive compensation for his or her services, who is an active member of an animal response team and has either been activated by directive of the commissioner or is acting in an official capacity of the animal response team pursuant to guidelines from the commissioner.

2. The commissioner shall be responsible for training such teams established pursuant to this section to ensure response during emergencies and disasters.

3. Individuals appointed to an animal response team shall be deemed volunteer state employees for purposes of section seventeen of the public officers law and section three of the workers' compensation law.

4. The commissioner shall promulgate rules and regulations relating to the formation, training, appointing and activation of state and county animal response teams established pursuant to this article, and is authorized to solicit and accept funds from any public or private source to help carry out the provisions of this article. Provided, however, that the commissioner shall consult with state and local emergency personnel relative to the activation of such animal response teams.

CREDIT(S)

(Added L.2008, c. 182, § 1, eff. July 7, 2008.)

 

McKinney's Consolidated Laws of New York Annotated. Public Authorities Law. Chapter 43-a. Of the Consolidated Laws. Article 5. Public Utility Authorities. Title 11. Metropolitan Transportation Authority

§ 1264-a. State of emergency; boarding of a commuter transportation by domestic companion animals

1. For the purposes of this section:

(a) “Commuter transportation” means commuter transportation, and other related services and facilities, operated by the authority or any of its subsidiaries, including but not limited to such transportation by railroad, omnibus, marine and air, in accordance with this title.

(b) “Domestic companion animal” means a companion animal or pet as defined in section three hundred fifty of the agriculture and markets law and shall also mean any other domesticated animal normally maintained in or near the household of the owner or person who cares for such other domesticated animal. “Pet” or “companion animal” shall not include a “farm animal”, as defined in section three hundred fifty of the agriculture and markets law.

2. (a) In the event that a state of emergency has been declared and an evacuation of any region of the state is in progress, the owner of a domestic companion animal shall be permitted to board any commuter transportation with such domestic companion animal so long as that animal is under the owner's control by use of a leash or tether, or is properly confined in an appropriate container or by other suitable means, provided that such boarding is authorized by and consistent with the provisions of state disaster emergency plans or local state of emergency plans pertaining to the needs of animals and individuals with an animal under their care. The provisions of this section shall only apply to the owners of domestic companion animals who are evacuating from a region of the state affected by an emergency or disaster, or a local state of emergency, as defined in section twenty-four of the executive law.

(b) A domestic companion animal may be refused permission to board any commuter transportation, even if the animal is under the owner's control or properly confined in accordance with this subdivision if there is reasonable cause to believe that, due to attendant circumstances, permitting the animal to board would pose a health or safety hazard.

3. All passengers with service animals shall be given priority seating on all means of transportation regulated by this title in accordance with the federal “Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990” (42 U.S.C. s.12101 et seq.). For the purposes of this section, “service animal” shall have the same meaning as set forth in the federal “Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990” (42 U.S.C. s.12101 et seq.) and any regulations under such act.

4. All passengers on any commuter transportation shall be provided seating before a domestic companion animal may be placed in a seat.

5. The authority is authorized to promulgate and enforce such rules and regulations as shall be necessary for the implementation of this section.

Credits
(Added L.2017, c. 378, § 1, eff. Nov. 22, 2017.)

 

McKinney's Consolidated Laws of New York Annotated. Unconsolidated Laws. Title 17. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Chapter 1. Compact Between New York and New Jersey Creating Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

§ 6408-e. Emergency evacuation; boarding of public transportation or public transportation service with domestic companion animal

<[Effective upon contingency pursuant to L.2018, c. 284, § 2.] >

ARTICLE VII-E

1. a. For the purposes of this article:

(i) “Domestic companion animal” means a companion animal or pet as defined in section three hundred fifty of the agriculture and markets law and shall also mean any other domesticated animal normally maintained in or near the household of the owner or person who cares for such other domesticated animal. “Pet” or “companion animal” shall not include a “farm animal,” as defined in section three hundred fifty of the agriculture and markets law.

(ii) “Public transportation or public transportation service” means rail passenger service, motorbus regular route service, paratransit service, motorbus charter service, and ferry passenger service.

b. (i) In the event that a state of emergency has been declared and an evacuation of any region of the state is in progress, the owner of a domestic companion animal shall be permitted to board any public transportation or public transportation service with the domestic companion animal so long as that animal is under the owner's control by use of a leash or tether, or is properly confined in an appropriate container or by other suitable means, provided that such boarding is authorized by and consistent with the provisions of state disaster emergency plans or local state of emergency plans pertaining to the needs of animals and individuals with an animal under their care. The provisions of this article shall only apply to the owners of domestic companion animals who are evacuating from a region of the state affected by the emergency or local disaster emergency as defined in section twenty of the executive law, or a local state of emergency, as defined in section twenty-four of the executive law.

(ii) A domestic companion animal may be refused permission to board any public transportation or public transportation service, even if the animal is under the owner's control or properly confined in accordance with this paragraph if there is reasonable cause to believe that, due to attendant circumstances, permitting the animal to board would pose a health or safety hazard.

c. All passengers with service animals shall be given priority seating on all means of transportation regulated by this article in accordance with the federal “Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990” (42 U.S.C. s.12101 et seq.). For the purposes of this article, “service animal” shall have the same meaning as set forth in the federal “Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990” (42 U.S.C. s.12101 et seq.) and any regulations under the act.

d. All passengers on any public transportation or public transportation service shall be provided seating before a domestic companion animal may be placed in a seat.

2. The port authority is hereby authorized to make and enforce such rules and regulations necessary for the implementation of this article.

Credits
(Added L.2018, c. 284, § 1.)

 

Share |