Colorado

Displaying 21 - 30 of 61
Titlesort descending Summary
CO - Farming - Article 50.5. Confinement of Calves Raised for Veal and Pregnant Sows This 2008 Colorado statute applies to the confinement of calves raised for veal and pigs during pregnancy. This statute provides that calves raised for veal and sows during pregnancy must be able to lie down, stand up, and turn around without touching the sides of their enclosure.
CO - Fort Lupton - Breed - Sec. 7-241 Pit bulls prohibited


It is unlawful to own, keep, possess, maintain, harbor or transport any pit bull in or through Fort Lupton, Colorado, with certain exceptions for licensed vets and animal shelters. Dogs that have already been licensed may remain, as long as the owner is 21 years of age, shows proof of rabies vaccination and liability insurance of $100,000, keeps the dog properly confined, and posts “PIT BULL DOG" signs. Failure to comply with all of the terms shall subject the pit bull to immediate impoundment and disposal.

CO - Fur - § 12b. Prohibited methods of taking wildlife (Constitutional Provision)


This Colorado constitutional provision provides that it is unlawful to take wildlife with any leghold trap, any instant kill body-gripping design trap, or by poison or snare in the state of Colorado subject to the listed exceptions.

CO - Humane Slaughter - Article 33. Custom Processing of Meat Animals.


This Colorado section includes both the meat processing laws and the humane slaughter provisions.  It covers livestock, which are defined as cattle, calves, sheep, swine, horses, mules, goats, and any other animal which may be used in and for the preparation of meat or meat products.  No processor shall shackle, hoist, or otherwise bring livestock into position for slaughter or shall slaughter livestock except by humane methods as defined by regulation; the use of a manually operated hammer, sledge, or poleax is not permitted.  Additionally, poultry shall be slaughtered in accordance with "good commercial practices" and in a manner that will result in thorough bleeding.  Any person who violates any provision is subject to a civil penalty of not more than $750 per violation for each day of violation and commits a class 2 misdemeanor.

CO - Hunting - Willful Destruction of Wildlife


Colorado has a unique statute specific to poaching for the purpose of acquiring parts or "trophies" from an animal with the intent of abandoning the carcass, or even soliciting someone else to do so.  Taking or hunting big game, eagles, or endangered species with this intent results in a felony.  The intent of the law is stated "to protect the wildlife from wanton, ruthless, or wasteful destruction or mutilation for their heads, hides, claws, teeth, antlers, horns, internal organs, or feathers."

CO - Impound - Article 4. Disease Control This Colorado statute provides that it is unlawful for any owner of any dog, cat, other pet animal, or other mammal which has not been inoculated as required by the order of the county board of health or board of health of a health department to allow it to run at large. The health department or health officer may capture and impound any such dog, cat, other pet animal.
CO - Impound - Colorado Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act


This is an example of a state statute that creates minimum holding periods that shelters must hold found pets for before allowing the pets to be adopted or otherwise disposed of.

CO - Impoundment - Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power.


This Colorado statute immunizes the board of county commissioners or other local governing entity from liability associated with the impoundment of pet animals.  Specifically, it states the board or anyone authorized to enforce a local ordinance shall not be held responsible for any accident or subsequent disease that may occur to the animal in connection with the administration of the resolution or ordinance.

CO - Initiatives - Amendment 14, Regulation of Commercial Hog Facilities This 1998 Colorado Ballot Measure created additional regulations for large-scale hog producers. The goal was to better curb the waste run-off from such facilities. It passed in the 1998 election with 64.2% of the vote.
CO - Initiatives - Amendment 13 (livestock operations) This 1998 Colorado ballot measure sought to create uniform livestock regulations based on the potential environmental impact that the operation causes (rather than the character of the farm). It specifically sought to target the non-point pollution caused by large-scale operation run-off. The measure further added a definition for "livestock." It failed at the polls with only 38.7% of the vote.

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