California

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CA - Horse slaughter - § 598d. Sale of horsemeat for human consumption

This statute prohibits the sale of horsemeat for human consumption. No  restaurant, cafe, or other public eating place may offer horsemeat for sale for human consumption. A first time violation is a misdemeanor.

CA - Horse slaughter - § 598c. Horse slaughter for human consumption

This statute makes it unlawful to possess, to import into or export from the state, or to sell, buy, give away, hold, or accept any equine with the intent of killing it for the purpose of human consumption. Violations could result in a felony conviction with a prison sentence of up to three years.

CA - Horse slaughter - § 597o. Humane transportation of equine to slaughter; vehicle requirements;

This statute outlines the requirements for transporting equine to slaughter, including, but limited to, proper ventilation, sufficient space for equine to stand, and the use of ramps and floors with nonskid surfaces.

CA - Horse docking - § 597q. Docked horses; unregistered; prima facie evidence

This statute provides that driving, working, keeping, racing or using any unregistered docked horse 60 days after the passage of this act is prima facie evidence of the fact that the party engaged in such activity docked the tail of such horse.

CA - Horse docking - § 597p. Docked horses; registration; time; fee; certificate

This statute requires every owner, or user of any docked horse, within the State of California, to register his or her docked horse.

CA - Horse - § 21759. Caution in passing animals

This California law provides that the driver of any vehicle that approaches a horse drawn vehicle, any ridden animal, or livestock must exercise proper control of his vehicle and shall reduce speed or stop as may appear necessary to avoid frightening the animal and to insure safety of the person in charge of the animal.

CA - Historical - Statutes of 1900: Sections 597-599c


The General Laws of California from 1900 covers such sections concerning: Cruelty to Animals, Poisoning of Cattle, killing of birds in cemeteries and killing of gulls or cranes.  The Cruelty to Animal section describes laws concerning horses, abandoned animal, torture and maiming of animals, use of animals in fights, and arrest without warrants.  In addition, the section covers evidence, stallions, and impounding without food and water.  The section about the killing of birds in the cemetery concerns also killing and detaining of homing pigeons.  The last section about killing of gulls and cranes also concerns the destruction of eggs and nests. 

CA - Historical - General Laws of 1913: Title 14: Section 596-599f


The General Laws of California from 1913, title 14, covers Malicious Mischief which includes sections concerning: Cruelty to Animals, Poisoning of Cattle, killing of birds in cemeteries and killing of gulls or cranes.  The Cruelty to Animal section describes laws concerning horses, abandoned animal, torture and maiming of animals, use of animals in fights, and arrest without warrants.  In addition, the section covers evidence, stallions, and impounding without food and water.  The section about the killing of birds in the cemetery concerns also killing and detaining of homing pigeons.  The last section about killing of gulls and cranes also concerns the destruction of eggs and nests.  In addition, the section covers killing of elk and prosecution for these offenses.


CA - Historical - 1872: Cruelty to Animals


Enacted February 14, 1872 (almost identical with Field's Draft, Section 699), and then read: "Every person who maliciously kills, maims, or wounds an animal, the property of another, or who maliciously and cruelly beats, tortures, or injures any animal, whether belonging to himself or another, is guilty of a misdemeanor."

CA - Fur - § 996. Fur bearing animals raised in captivity; ownership; protection of law

This California law provides that any furbearing animal whether born in captivity or brought into captivity for the purpose of pelting fur is regarded as personal property, the same as other domestic animals.

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