Displaying 21 - 30 of 51
Titlesort ascending Author Citation Alternate Citation Summary Type
UK - Cruelty - Protection of Animals Act 1911 1911 Ch 27

The main piece of anti-cruelty legislation applicable to England and Wales. Click here for the 2006 Amendments to this Act.

UK - Cruelty - Protection against Cruel Tethering Act 1988 1988 c.31

The Protection against Cruel Tethering Act 1988 is an act to protect horses, asses and mules against cruel tethering. This means in such conditions or such a manner to cause that animal unnecessary suffering.

UK - Cruelty - Animal Welfare Act Animal Welfare Act of 2006

This is the overarching general anti-cruelty law for the UK, which uses suffering as a key concept.

UK - Circus - Performing Animals (Regulation) Act 1925 1925 CHAPTER 38

The Performing Animals Act 1925 requires any person who exhibits or trains any performing (vertebrate) animal to be registered with a local authority. This information is kept in the local register. The law also gives power to local authorities to prohibit animal training or exhibition where it is accompanied by cruelty.  Any officer of a local authority duly authorised in that behalf by the local authority and any constable may inspect performance premises during reasonable hours. Failure to become properly registered or concealing an animal to avoid inspection makes a person guilty of an offence.

UK - Boarding - Animal Boarding Establishments Act 1963 1963 c. 43

The 1963 Animal Boarding Establishments Act deals with places where the boarding of animals is being carried on as a business. This act requires such establishments to be licensed by the local authority. The act defines "boarding establishments" as those premises, including private dwellings, where the business consists of providing accommodation for other people’s cats and dogs. When deciding to issue a license, the local authority shall consider the suitability of the conditions (e.g., size of quarters, lighting, food, water, disease control, etc.) present at the boarding establishment.

UK - Animal Welfare - Animal Welfare Act 2006 UK ST 2006 c 45 An Act establishing penalties for engaging in certain activities that are considered detrimental to animal welfare.   Activities that constitute offenses include: causing an animal unnecessary suffering, mutilating an animal’s body, docking a dog’s tail (with certain limited exceptions), administering a poisonous or injurious substance to an animal, and engaging in or attending animal fighting.   Nothing in the Act applies to anything lawfully done under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 or to anything which occurs in the normal course of fishing.   Statute
The United Kingdom (UK) Rebecca Wisch

Brief Summary of United Kingdom Animal Law
Rebecca F. Wisch (2010)

Topical Introduction
The United Kingdom

The United Kingdom

UK Pet Stores

Taylor v. RSPCA [2001] EWHC Admin 103 [2001] 2 Cr App R 24; (2001) 165 JP 567; [2001] Crim LR 388; (2001) 165 JPN 625

Two women, who had been disqualified from keeping horses by a court, transferred ownership of the horses to their niece, but had continued to make arrangements for the accommodation of the horses and to provide food and water for them. The women were convicted in the Magistrates' Court of the offence of "having custody" of the horses in breach of the disqualification order, and appealed. Dismissing the appeal, the Divisional Court held that, what amounted to "custody" was primarily a matter of fact for the lower court to decide, and that the local justices had been entitled to conclude that, notwithstanding the transfer of ownership, the two women had continued to be in control, or have the power to control, the horses.

Scotland - Animal Welfare - 2003 Proposal The Scottish Executive (SE) issued a consultation paper on 21st March 2003 on proposals to amend the Protection of Animals (Scotland) Act 1912. These proposals were aimed at addressing the specific problem of the lack of statutory powers available to local authorities to remove neglected farm livestock, which are suffering or at risk of suffering, to a place of safely. The responses from a number of organisations to that paper have shown a clear desire for a much wider reform of our existing animal welfare legislation. Ministers now wish to consider expanding the proposed amendment to the Protection of Animals (Scotland) Act 1912 and to introduce wider legislation aimed at consolidating and updating much of the existing animal welfare legislation in Scotland. The purpose of any new legislation will be to prevent cruelty to any animal and to set out the obligations of people to promote the welfare of all animals (including domestic pets) for which they are either permanently or temporarily responsible. This will include owning, managing, or in any way keeping any animal, including buying, selling and transporting. Statute