Results

Displaying 41 - 50 of 5977
Titlesort descending Author Citation Alternate Citation Summary Type
2014 International Animal Law Conference

2014 II Global Animal Law Conference

Policy
2014 State Legislative Review Aaron C. Johnson 21 Animal L. 383 (2015) This article provides a review of significant state animal-related legislation from 2014. Article
2015 State Law Amendments Rebecca F. Wisch Animal Legal & Historical Center

This table summarizes the statutory amendments that occurred in 2015. The table gives a brief description of the changes and links to the actual text of the laws.

Topic Table
2016 Statutory Amendments Table Rebecca F. Wisch Animal Legal & Historical Center

This table details the animal-related legislative changes that occurred across all fifty states in 2016. Links are provided to the amended laws and a summary of the change appears in the adjacent column.

Topic Table
2017 Statutory Amendments Table Rebecca F. Wisch Animal Legal & Historical Center This table details the animal-related legislative changes that occurred across all fifty states in 2017. Links are provided to the amended laws and a summary of the change appears in the adjacent column. Topic Table
2018 Statutory Amendment Table Rebecca F. Wisch Animal Legal & Historical Center This document provides a summary and table illustrating amendments to state laws in 2018. Topic Table
32 Pit Bulldogs and Other Property v. County of Prentiss 808 So.2d 971 (Miss. S.C. 2002) 808 So.2d 971 (Miss. S.C. 2002) While a criminal trial regarding alleged dog-fighting was pending, the Circuit Court, Prentiss County, ordered the humane euthanization of 18 of 34 seized pit bulldogs. The alleged dog owner appealed. The Supreme Court held that allegations the dogs had been trained to fight, could not be rehabilitated as pets, and posed serious threat to other animals and people, related to the "physical condition" of the dogs, as statutory basis for humane euthanization. Affirmed.
Case
907 Whitehead Street, Inc. v. Secretary of U.S. Dept. of Agriculture 701 F.3d 1345 (C.A.11 (Fla.)) 2012 WL 6061706 (C.A.11 (Fla.))

The appellant in this case, the Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum in Key West, Florida ("Museum"), appeals the lower court's determination that it is an animal exhibitor for purposes of the Animal Welfare Act ("AWA"). Appellant contends that while admission is charged for the Museum, it does not exhibit the Hemingway cats to the public for compensation; thus, the cats are not distributed through interstate commerce. The court, however, found that since the AWA itself is ambiguous on the question of whether "distribution" includes the fixed-site commercial display of animals, the USDA's broader interpretation of "distribution" and "exhibitor" are entitled to legal deference. While the court sympathized with the museum's frustrations, it affirmed the district court's findings of law and held that Museum is an AWA animal exhibitor subject to USDA regulation

Case
A 'HARE' RAISING LAPSE IN MEAT INDUSTRY REGULATION: HOW REGULATORY REFORM WILL PULL THE MEAT RABBIT OUT FROM WELFARE NEGLECT Taylor Budnick 21 Animal L. 329 (2015) Rabbits are most commonly perceived as soft, fuzzy, tender, loving, active household pets. However, rabbit meat is growing in popularity among urban farmers, foodies, and chefs alike. The pet rabbit industry is subject to a variety of laws and regulations intended to ensure the humane and proper treatment of these beloved pets. Yet, 'meat rabbits,' which are often the same breed or species as pet rabbits, are often not covered by either the protections that govern the treatment of animals used for meat or the protections that govern the treatment of rabbits as pets or companion animals. The lack of laws and regulations applicable to the meat rabbit industry has led to widely documented inhumane treatment and animal abuse. Such beloved companions deserve the benefits of increased government oversight of rabbit meat production. This Article proposes that, on the federal level, the United States Department of Agriculture inspection of commercial rabbit producers and processors should be mandatory rather than voluntary. States must also play a central role because, given the nature of the rabbit meat industry, it is especially important that any new standards reach small farms and urban farmers, in addition to commercial producers. This Article proposes that state standards use puppy mill laws as guidance, given rabbits' societal status as companion animals. New laws governing the raising of meat rabbits should establish standards for light and ventilation, requirements for environmental enrichment, limits on breeding, and floor space minimums for cages. Such changes will ensure that the rabbit's more typical role as a companion animal is acknowledged, while providing the necessary protection from abuse and mistreatment when rabbits are raised for meat consumption. Article
A Brief Explanation of Colombia’s Legal System Angie Vega Colombia Legal System Summary This document provides an overview of Colombia's legal system and civil law structure. Article

Pages