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Titlesort descending Citation Alternate Citation Summary Type
AR - Damages, stock - § 23-12-909. Killed or injured animals--Rights of owner A.C.A. § 23-12-909 AR ST § 23-12-909 This law states that any person who has a special ownership in any horses, mules, cattle, or other stock killed or wounded by any railroad trains running in this state may sue the company running the trains for the damages within 12 months of the injury. Statute
CA - Damages - Injuries to animals; exemplary damages West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 3340 CA CIVIL § 3340 Exemplary damages may be given for injuries to animals committed in disregard of humanity either willfully or through gross negligence. Statute
CA - Theft - § 487e. Grand theft; dog exceeding value of $950 West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 487e, 487f, 487g, 491 CA PENAL § 487e, 487f, 487g, 491 These provisions of the California Penal Code deal with stealing dogs and other animals. A person who feloniously steals, takes, or carries away a dog of another where the dog's value exceeds $950 is guilty of grand theft. If the value of the dog is less than $950, it is petty theft. If a person steals or maliciously takes an animal of another for purposes of sale, medical research, slaughter, or other commercial use (or does so by fraud or false representation), he or she commits a public offense punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding 1 year or in the state prison. Statute
Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 329: Section 6268 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 6268 (1918) Section 6268 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the unlawful injury to certain property of another.  Specifically, the statute states the punishment for hurting, maiming, poisoning anther's cattle, ox, horse, and mule. Statute
CT - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws C. G. S. A. § 14-226; § 22-327 - 367a; § 26-39; § 26-49; § 26-51; § 26-107 CT ST § 14-226; § 22-327 - § 22-367a; CT ST § 26-39; § 26-49; § 26-51; § 26-107

These Connecticut statutes comprise the state's dog law.  Among the provisions include licensing, kennel, and rabies regulations.  With regard to damage by dogs, the law provides a form of strict liability that states if any dog does any damage to either the body or property of any person, the owner or keeper shall be liable for such damage, except when such damage has been occasioned to the body or property of a person who, at the time such damage was sustained, was committing a trespass or other tort, or was teasing, tormenting or abusing such dog.  The law also contains a unique "dogs on highway" provision that provides that any person owning or having the custody of any dog which habitually goes out on any highway and growls, bites, or snaps at, or otherwise annoys, any person or domestic animal lawfully using such highway or chases or interferes with any motor vehicle so using such highway, shall be guilty of a class D misdemeanor.  Further, among the nuisance provisions, the law states that no person shall own or harbor a dog which is a nuisance by reason of vicious disposition or excessive barking or other disturbance. These laws also contain provisions on reporting neglected or cruelly treated animals.  Finally, Connecticut has an anti-ear cropping measures that prohibits cropping by anyone who is not a registered veterinary surgeon, and who performs the operation when the dog is under an anesthetic.

Statute
DE - Property - § 3050F. Dogs deemed personal property; theft; penalty 16 Del.C. § 3050F DE ST TI 16 § 3050F Dogs are considered personal property in Delaware. Statute
IA - Dog as property - 351.25. Dog as property I. C. A. § 351.25 IA ST § 351.25 This Iowa statute distinguishes between licensed and unlicensed dogs. Specifically, it provides that all dogs under six months of age, and all dogs over said age and wearing a collar with a valid rabies vaccination tag attached to the collar, shall be deemed property. Dogs not provided with a rabies vaccination tag shall not be deemed property. Statute
ID - Dog, property - Chapter 28. Dogs. I.C. § 25-2807 ID ST § 25-2807 This Idaho statute states that dogs are considered property. It further provides that no entity of state or local government may by ordinance or regulation prevent the owner of any dog from protecting it from loss by the use of an electronic locating collar. Statute
IL - Service Animal - Chapter 740. Civil Liabilities. 740 I.L.C.S. 13/1 - 10 IL ST CH 740 § 13/1 - 10 Under this Illinois statute, a physically impaired person may bring an action for both economic and noneconomic damages against a person who steals, injures, or attacks his or her assistance animal with hazardous chemicals (provided he or she reasonably knew the guide dog was present and the chemical was hazardous). The economic damages recoverable include veterinary medical expenses, replacement costs, and temporary replacement assistance (provided by person or animal). No cause of action lies where the physically impaired person was committing a civil or criminal trespass at the time of the attack or theft. Statute
IN - Property - (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.) - Dogs as Personal Property for Taxation I.C. 15-5-10-1 (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.) IN ST 15-5-10-1 Dogs are considered personal property in Indiana (repealed). Statute

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