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Titlesort descending Summary
AK - Importation - Article 1. Importation of Animals


These Alaska regulations concern the importation requirements for animals. Health certificates and permits from the state veterinarian are required.

AK - Initiatives - 05HUNT (shooting bears and wolves from aircraft) This 2008 measure was an initiated state statute presented to voters in August of 2008. The measure would have prohibited shooting of a free-ranging wolf, wolverine, or grizzly bear the same day that the person has been airborne. It was defeated by a margin of 44.4% for the measure and 55.6% against on August 26th.
AK - Initiatives - Ballot Measure 1 (voter wildlife initatives) This Alaska ballot measure would change the Alaska Constitution so that voters could not use the initiative process to make laws that permit, regulate, or prohibit taking or transporting wildlife, or prescribe seasons or methods for taking wildlife. The measure failed with 36% of the vote.
AK - Initiatives - Ballot Measure 3 (bear baiting or feeding) This Alaska ballot measure was defeated in the November 2004 election. It would have made it illegal for a person to bait or intentionally feed a bear for purposes of hunting, viewing, or photographing the bear. A person who violated this proposed law would have been guilty of a Class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to one-year imprisonment and a fine of up to $10,000. It failed with only 43.3% of the vote.
AK - Initiatives - Ballot Measure 6 (hunters using airplanes) Voters are asked to either approve or reject a law allowing hunters to use airplanes to land and shoot wolves on the same day they fly. The law allows any person with a hunting or trapping license to land and shoot in areas established by the Board of Game. No additional permit may be required. The law also allows the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to use agents, as well as employees, to engage in same day airborne shooting of wolves. The measure passed with 53% of the vote.
AK - Initiatives - Ballot Measure 9 (wolf trapping) This bill would have prohibited a person from using a snare with the intent of trapping a wolf and appeared on the 2000 ballot. It would also have prohibited a person from possessing, buying, selling, or offering to sell the skin of a wolf known by the person to have been caught with a snare. Breaking the law would have been a Class A misdemeanor. The measure failed with only 37.3% of the vote.
AK - Ordinances - § 03.55.070. Power of village council to control dogs



This Alaska statute enables a village council the power to destroy loose dogs in the village and otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities. 


The council may impose and enforce the provisions of a dog control ordinance in the total area within 20 miles of the village.

AK - Trusts - § 13.12.907. Honorary trusts; trusts for pets


This Alaska statute provides that trusts for the continuing care of designated domestic animals are valid, provided they are a duration of 21 years or less.  The trust terminates when a living animal is no longer covered by the trust.  Any remaining trust funds do not go to the trustee, but rather transfer by the order stipulated in the statute.

AK - Veterinary - Chapter 98. Veterinarians.


These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

AK - Veterinary immunity - § 09.65.097. Civil liability for emergency veterinary care


This Alaska law provides that a licensed veterinarian who renders emergency care to an injured or ill animal that reasonably appears to need emergency care to avoid serious harm or death is not liable for civil damages as a result of an act or omission in rendering emergency aid. This section does not apply to service rendered at the request of an owner of the animal and does not preclude liability for civil damages as a result of gross negligence or reckless or intentional misconduct.

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