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AK - Ordinances - § 03.55.070. Power of village council to control dogs



This Alaska statute enables a village council the power to destroy loose dogs in the village and otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities. 


The council may impose and enforce the provisions of a dog control ordinance in the total area within 20 miles of the village.

AK - Trusts - § 13.12.907. Honorary trusts; trusts for pets


This Alaska statute provides that trusts for the continuing care of designated domestic animals are valid, provided they are a duration of 21 years or less.  The trust terminates when a living animal is no longer covered by the trust.  Any remaining trust funds do not go to the trustee, but rather transfer by the order stipulated in the statute.

AK - Veterinary - Chapter 98. Veterinarians.


These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

AK - Veterinary immunity - § 09.65.097. Civil liability for emergency veterinary care


This Alaska law provides that a licensed veterinarian who renders emergency care to an injured or ill animal that reasonably appears to need emergency care to avoid serious harm or death is not liable for civil damages as a result of an act or omission in rendering emergency aid. This section does not apply to service rendered at the request of an owner of the animal and does not preclude liability for civil damages as a result of gross negligence or reckless or intentional misconduct.

AK - Wildlife - 5 AAC 92.200. Purchase and sale of game; 5 AAC 92.002. Liability for violations.


This Alaska regulation relates to the purchase or sale of game or parts of game. Liability for violation is provided in Section 92.002.

AK - Zoo - § 09.65.180. Civil liability of zoos


The Alaska law provides that, except as provided in (b), a person who owns or operates a zoo is strictly liable for injury to a person or property if the injury is caused by an animal owned by or in the custody of the zoo.

AKERS v. SELLERS


This Indiana case involves an action in replevin by John W. Akers against his former wife, Stella Sellers. The controversy at issue was ownership and possession of a Boston bull terrier dog. At the time of the divorce decree, the dog was not part of the property division and was instead left at the marriage domicile in custody of the former wife. Appellant-Akers claimed that legal title and the dog's best interests rested with him and unsuccessfully brought a suit in replevin in the lower court. On appeal, this Court held that there was no sufficient evidence to overturn the lower court's determination. The judgment was affirmed.

Akron ex rel. Christman-Resch v. Akron


City of Akron, Ohio cat owners filed suit against city, its mayor, and city council president, seeking declaratory judgment that new city code sections, relating to the trapping and euthanization of free-roaming cats, were unconstitutional.  After the Court of Common Pleas, Summit County granted summary judgment to defendants, the cat owners appealed.  The Court of Appeals held that the city's ordinances relating to the trapping and euthanization of free-roaming cats did not violate cat owners' substantive due process rights.  Further, the ordinances which allowed a cat to be euthanized after three business days following the date of impoundment, did not violate cat owners' procedural due process rights or right to equal protection.  Finally, the ordinances, which allowed city to seize free-roaming cats in response to complaints, did not violate the Fourth Amendment and city's actions were covered by sovereign immunity.

AL - Importation, wildlife - 220-2-.26. Restrictions On Possession, Sale, Importation And/Or Release Of Certain Animals And


This Alabama regulation provides that no person shall possess, sell, offer for sale, import, or bring into the state any of the listed species including piranha, mongoose, non-native coyote, fox, black bear, and others. Another section provides that no person shall propagate or release any nutria in the state. It is also unlawful for any person to have in possession any live, protected wild bird or wild animal or live embryo, eggs, or sperm of these protected wild birds or animals.

AL - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws


The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

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