Displaying 31 - 40 of 93
Titlesort ascending Summary
Parker v. Parker

Plaintiff and his 12 year-old quarter horse were visiting defendant at defendant's property when defendant's dog rushed at the horse causing it to run into a steel fence. The horse suffered severe head trauma, which necessitated its later euthanization. Plaintiff filed suit for damages asserting liability under common law negligence and O.R.S. 609.140(1) - the statute that allows an owner to recover double damages where livestock is injured due to being injured, chased, or killed by another person's dog. The appellate court agreed with plaintiff that O.R.S. 609.140(1) creates an statutory cause of action independent from negligence. Further, the court found that plaintiff fell within the class of persons the statute aims to protect because the legislature did not intend to limit the statute's application to property owned by the livestock's owner.

Overview of Oregon Great Ape Laws This is a short overview of Oregon Great Ape law.
Oregon Game Fowl Breeders Ass'n v. Smith

This is an appeal of an action by a fowl breeder's association to declare Oregon laws against cockfighting unconstitutional.  Game fowl breeders brought an action against a district attorney and State Attorney General seeking judgment that statutes prohibiting cruelty to animals were unconstitutional and seeking an injunction against enforcement of statutes against breeders for cockfighting. The Court of Appeals held that the practice of breeding birds suitable for cockfighting did not qualify as 'good livestock husbandry' and that cockfighting was prohibited by statute.

OR - Veterinary - Chapter 686. Veterinarians; Veterinary Technicians.

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

OR - Vehicle - 811.200. Carrying dog on external part of vehicle; penalties This Oregon law states that a person commits a Class D traffic violation if he or she carries a dog upon the hood, fender, running board or other external part of any automobile or truck that is upon a highway unless the dog is protected by framework, carrier or other device sufficient to keep it from falling from the vehicle.
OR - Trusts - 130.185. Pet trust.

This statute comprises Oregon's Pet Trust law based on the Uniform Trust Code.  Under the law, a trust may be created to provide for the care of one or more animals that are alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

OR - Sharks - 498.257. Possession, sale, etc. of shark fins prohibited; exceptions

Under these Oregon statutes, a person may not possess, sell or offer for sale, trade or distribute a shark fin. However, there are exceptions for shark fins from spiny dogfish, for people who have a shark license, and for fish processors who have a license.

OR - Rehabilitation, wildlife - Chapter 635. Department of Fish and Wildlife.

[Note: repealed 2015] Under this set of Oregon regulations, any person desiring to hold any bird, mammal, amphibian or reptile for the purpose of wildlife rehabilitation must first obtain a Wildlife Rehabilitation Permit from the Department of Fish and Wildlife. The requirements and conditions to obtain a permit is also provided. In addition to an Oregon Wildlife Rehabilitation Permit, persons possessing this permit must also obtain a federal permit for species protected by federal law and provide a copy of the current valid federal permit to the Department. Other sections provide prohibited species under the permit and facility requirements.

OR - Property - 609.020. Dogs declared personal property

Dogs are considered personal property in Oregon.

OR - Primates - 603-011-0381 Importation of Nonhuman Primates

This Oregon regulation provides that no person shall ship, move, or import into this state any nonhuman primates (including, but not limited to, monkeys, baboons, gibbons, chimpanzees, and marmosets) without first obtaining a permit from the Department. Further, all nonhuman primates shipped, moved, or imported into this state shall also be accompanied by an official health certificate certifying that said animals are free from the following human pathogenic agents.