North Carolina

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NC - Disaster - North Carolina Emergency Operations Plan The North Carolina Emergency Operations Plan is published by the North Carolina Department of Public Safety. The plan has a specific section on animal protection that is designed to help protect both domestic and wild animals. In the section on "scope," the plan says that "[a]nimal Protection actions will be aimed at all animals, whether owned, stray, or domestic, that may need help during disaster situations."
NC - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws

These North Carolina statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include pet shop provisions, rabies vaccination laws, and the dangerous dog chapter.

NC - Domestic Violence - Chapter 50B. Domestic Violence. § 50B-3. Relief

This North Carolina law reflects the state's provision for protective orders in cases of domestic abuse. A protective order may provide for possession of personal property of the parties, including the care, custody, and control of any animal owned, possessed, kept, or held as a pet by either party or minor child residing in the household. The court may also order a party to refrain from cruelly treating or abusing an animal owned, possessed, kept, or held as a pet by either party or minor child residing in the household.

NC - Ecoterrorism - § 99A-1. Recovery of Damages for Exceeding the Scope of Authorized Access to Property

This law is known as North Carolina’s Property Protection Act and is what many consider to be a new variation of ag-gag law. § 99A-2 imposes a civil punishment for “exceeding the scope of authorized access to property.” A person exceeds access to authority by intentionally gaining access to the non-public areas of another’s premises and removing (and subsequently distributing) documents, recording images or sounds, placing a camera on the premises, conspiring in organized retail theft, or interfering with property. The punishment for violation of the Property Protection Act can result in equitable relief, compensatory damages, costs and fees, and exemplary damages of $5,000 per day that a defendant has acted in violation. The law is effective January 1, 2016.

NC - Edenton - Breed - Vicious Dogs


In Edenton, North Carolina, it is unlawful to keep, harbor, own or possess any potentially vicious dog, which includes pit bulls, Rottweilers, and Chows. There are exceptions for dogs registered on the effective date, provided that the owner uses a leash and muzzle on the dog, keeps it properly confined, posts “Beware of Dog” signs,  takes identification photographs, sterilizes the dog, and complies with reporting requirements. Failure to comply may result in seizure and impoundment of the dog.

NC - Endangered Species - Subchapter IV. Conservation of Marine and Estuarine and Wildlife Resources. Article 25. Endangered an

This North Carolina statutory section comprises the state's endangered species provisions.  Endangered species is defined as any native or once-native species of wild animal whose continued existence as a viable component of the State's fauna is determined by the Wildlife Resources Commission to be in jeopardy or any species of wild animal determined to be an "endangered species" pursuant to the Endangered Species Act.  The statute empowers the Wildlife Resources Commission to list species and also outlines the criteria for listing.

NC - Equine Activity Liability - Article 1. Equine Activity Liability

This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or equine professional, or any other person, including corporations and partnerships, are immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. New provisions added in 2013 now also protect a farm animal activity sponsor, a farm animal professional, or any other person engaged in a farm animal activity, including a corporation or partnership, shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of farm animal activities.   However, there are exceptions to this rule:   a person, corporation, or partnership will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant.

NC - Exotic Pets - .0212 Importation Requirements: WIild Animals


This North Carolina regulation states that person must obtain a permit from the State Veterinarian before importing any of the following animals into this State: skunk; fox; raccoon; ringtail; bobcat (includes lynx and other North and South American felines as cougars, jaguars, etc.); coyote; marten; brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). Permits for the importation into this State of any of these animals shall be issued only if the animal(s) will be used in a research institute, or for exhibition by a USDA licensed exhibitor, or organized entertainment as in zoos or circuses. Any species or hybrid of a mammal not otherwise covered in the Administrative Code that is found to exist in the wild or naturally occurs in the wild must be accompanied by a valid certificate of veterinary inspection.

NC - Exotic pets - Chapter 153A. Counties.

These two North Carolina statutes provide that a city or county may by ordinance regulate, restrict, or prohibit the possession or harboring of animals which are dangerous to persons or property.

NC - Foxes- 113-291.4. Regulation of foxes; study of fox and fur-bearer populations This statute controls the taking of foxes and the various acceptable methods for doing so. Foxes may be taken with dogs year-round. Foxes are only allowed to be taken by a firearm under certain exceptions and they are not allowed to be taken by any electronic calling device. The statute further states that the Wildlife Resources Commission is directed to study foxes and fur-bearer populations and that subject to the findings from those studies the Commission may open a season if it finds that fox populations in a particular area are adequate to support a harvesting of that population. Lawful methods for taking game animals apply to taking foxes when an open season is declared. The Commission must implement a system of tagging foxes and fox furs with a special tag. No foxes or furs may be sold without a tag. The Commission is also authorized to declare a closed season if it finds that hunting foxes with dogs causes a harmful affect on turkey restoration projects. The Commission also has the authority to establish reasonable population control measures if a contagious animal disease is found in a local fox population.

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