Mississippi

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Titlesort ascending Summary
MS - Exotic Pets - Rule 32. Public Notice No. 3523.002; Dangerous Wildlife


The following Mississippi regulations state that it is unlawful for any person to import, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal classified as inherently dangerous by law or regulation unless that person holds a permit or is exempt from holding a permit; these regulations, therefore, also indicate the requirements that must be met in order to obtain either a permit or an exemption. A violation of this act is a Class I violation and any person who has been convicted of a Class I violation shall be fined anywhere between $2,000.00 and $5,000.00, and shall be imprisoned in the county jail for 5 days. The person must also forfeit all hunting, trapping, and fishing privileges for a period of not less than 12 consecutive months from the date of conviction. Additionally, the regulations make provisions about how a wild animal shall be seized when these provisions have been violated. 

MS - Exotic pet - Chapter 8. Importation, Sale and Possession of Inherently Dangerous Wild Animals.


This Mississippi chapter states that it is in the public interest to ensure the public health, safety and welfare by strictly regulating the importation, sale, transfer and possession of those wild animals inherently dangerous to humans. Several species are listed under this section as inherently dangerous to humans, including non-human primates, wolves, bears, hyenas, big cats, and hippopotamus, among others. It is unlawful for a person to import, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal classified inherently dangerous by law or regulation unless that person holds a permit. Those persons who were in possession of such animals on or before May 1, 1997 were able to continue possession provided that they complied with the permit process. Prior to the issuance of a permit, the applicant must have provided proof of liability insurance in the amount of $100,000.00 for each wild animal up to a maximum of $1,000,000.00.

MS - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 11. Liability Exemption for Livestock Shows and Equine Activities


This Mississippi statute embodies the the intent of the Legislature to encourage equine and livestock activities by limiting the civil liability of those involved in such activities.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine or livestock activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.

MS - Endangered Species - Chapter 5. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act


These Mississippi statutes provide the short title for the Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act, the definitions for the Act, the legislative findings, and the associated regulations of the Act.  Violations under the Act may incur up to a $1,000 fine and/or one-year term of imprisonment as well as equipment confiscation.

MS - Ecoterrorism - Animal Research or Exhibiting Facilities Protection Act


This section comprises Mississippi's Animal Research or Exhibiting Facilities Protection Act. The act prohibits a person, without the effective consent of the owner, to acquire or otherwise exercise control over an animal facility with the intent to deprive the owner of the facility, animal or property and to disrupt or damage the enterprise conducted at the animal facility. A person is also prohibited from entering and remaining concealed at a facility with the intent to damage or disrupt the facility. Violation for damaging a facility is a fine of up to $10,000 and/or imprisonment for up to 3 years. Violation for illegal entry with an intent to damage or disrupt the facility results in a fine of up to $5,000 and/or imprisonment up to 1 year.

MS - Dog Theft - Chapter 17. Crimes Against Property

This Mississippi Statute provides that a person commits a felonious offense by stealing, taking and carrying away any dog that is the property of another. If the person who commits the offense is indicted and convicted for stealing the dog, he or she shall be punished by a fine not more than $500, imprisonment not more than 6 months, or both, or imprisoned in the penitentiary not less than 1 year nor more than 2 years.

MS - Dog Licenses - Chapter 53. Dogs and Rabies Control.


This Mississippi statute provides that it is the lawful duty for any sheriff, conservation officer or peace officer of a county or municipality to kill any dog above the age of three (3) months found running at large on whose neck there is no such collar and tag or who are not inoculated according to state law. No action shall be maintained by the owner for such killing.  However, the statute then goes on to say that it is the duty of such officer to first impound the dogs for five days and give a description of the dog to the sheriff.

MS - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws

These Mississippi statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions relating to hunting with dogs, local dog ordinances, and liability of owners for damage done by dogs.

MS - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 3. Crimes Against the Person.


This Mississippi law makes an owner liable for manslaughter if he or she wilfully allows a mischievous animal to go at large, or it goes at large because the owner fails to exercise ordinary care, and the animal, while at large or not confined, kills any human being who took reasonable precautions to avoid the animal.

MS - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes


This section constitutes Mississippi's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions, which were recently amended in 2011. The pertinent anti-cruelty law, § 97-41-1, states that any person who




intentionally or with criminal negligence




overrides, overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, unjustifiably injures, deprives of necessary sustenance, food, or drink, cruelly beats, or needlessly mutilates



any living creature

,


is guilty of a misdemeanor. The cat and dog cruelty provision, § 97-41-16, was significantly amended in 2011. This section, known as the "Mississippi Dog and Cat Pet Protection Law of 2011," makes it a misdemeanor to




intentionally or with criminal negligence




wound, deprive of adequate food, water, or shelter, or carry or confine in a cruel manner, any domesticated cat or dog. Aggravated cruelty occurs when a person with malice intentionally tortures, mutilates, maims, burns, starves or disfigures any domesticated dog or cat.

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