South Dakota

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Titlesort descending Summary
SD - Predator Control - Chapter 40-36. Predatory Animal and Reptile Control.


These South Dakota statutes pertain to predatory animal and reptile control. The Department of Game, Fish and Parks and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service work together to control coyotes, feral dogs, fox, prairie dogs, and other wild animals that are injurious to livestock, poultry, game, land, and the public health. Bounties may be paid for coyotes, if the bounty hunter has a license.

SD - Trap - 41-8-28. Trap robbing or injury as misdemeanor


This South Dakota law provides that any person who steals, damages or destroys a trap of another, or who steals, damages, or destroys animals, animal carcasses, or the pelts thereof, held fast by such traps, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

SD - Trust - 55-1-21. Trust for care of designated animal.


South Dakota's pet trust law was enacted in 2006. The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust. A governing instrument shall be liberally construed to bring the transfer within this section.

SD - Vehicle - 41-1-5.7. Disposition of deer and antelope killed by motor vehicle This South Dakota statute states that if any deer or antelope is killed by a motor vehicle on a public highway, the person who desires to possess that animal shall notify a conservation officer. The conservation officer may give a dated and written authorization allowing possession of the animal at no fee. However, no part of an animal so obtained may be sold, bartered, or traded.
SD - Vehicle - SDCL § 41-1-12. Euthanasia of animal injured in motor vehicle accident Any person who has seriously injured a wildlife animal or who comes upon a wildlife animal that has been seriously injured in a motor vehicle accident may euthanize the animal if that person has the means, skill, and will to euthanize humanely.
SD - Veterinary - Chapter 36-12. Veterinarians.


These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

State v. Fifteen Impounded Cats


Under a statute that allowed an officer to impound animals without a warrant if exigent circumstances exist, fifteen unconfined cats, who were roaming around a vehicle, were impounded. At a hearing to ratify the impoundment, the court found a large number of unconfined cats that obstructed the defendant's view for driving constituted exigent circumstances under SDCL 40-1-5. After a motion was granted to transfer ownership of the cats to a local humane society for adoption, the defendant appealed. The appeals court affirmed the lower court’s decision.

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