New Hampshire

Displaying 1 - 10 of 44
Titlesort descending Summary
Bohan v. Ritzo

In this New Hampshire case, a bicyclist brought suit against a dog owner under the state's strict liability statute for injuries he sustained when he fell from his bike after the owners' dog ran toward him. The jury awarded him $190,000 at trial. On appeal, this court found that the bicyclist's allegations were sufficient to sustain the jury's finding even though there was no evidence that the dog actually bit the plaintiff or made any physical contact. The Court held that there is nothing in the plain language of RSA 466:19 that would limit the statute's application actual bites or other direct physical contact. Instead, the statute makes dog owners strictly liable to “[a]ny person to whom ... damage may be occasioned by a dog not owned or kept by him.” RSA 466:19.

Detailed Discussion of New Hampshire Great Ape Laws The following article discusses Great Ape law in New Hampshire. In the state of New Hampshire, there is no specific law that contains an outright ban on private ownership of great apes. However, there are laws that address the importation and possession of wildlife.New Hampshire also has laws that address endangered species, animal cruelty, and the importation and possession of wildlife. Additionally,importation and possession of great apes is an area that is strictly regulated under New Hampshire law.
Durocher v. Rochester Equine Clinic

Plaintiff horse owner appealed from the orders of the Merrimack County Superior Court (New Hampshire), which dismissed his action for veterinarian malpractice for failure to designate an expert medical witness to prove that the owner's horse was permanently injured, and that defendant veterinarians' negligence caused such injury. On appeal, the court agreed that no medical expert testimony was necessary to determine whether a veterinarian was negligent in operating on the wrong animal. However, the court held that expert testimony was necessary to assist jurors in this case on the issues of causation and injury, and generally as to the standards of veterinary care.

McBride v. Orr

In this New Hampshire case, defendant animal control officer killed plaintiff’s dog believing that it was in pursuit of a deer. Defendant claimed immunity pursuant to a state statute. The Court reversed and remanded for a determination of damages for the plaintiff. The Court went on to state that the purpose of the statute was not to authorize defendant’s killing of plaintiff’s dog when the dog was no longer pursuing the deer.

Mellin v. Northern Security Insurance Company, Inc. This is an appeal brought by Mr. Mellin because his insurer, Northern, would not cover damages to Mellin's condominium caused by the odor of cat urine emanating from another tenant's condominium. This court reverses the lower court by deciding that the policy included pollution exclusion, but was ambiguous in whether that encompassed cat urine odor, so Mellin's claim is not precluded. The case was remanded for further proceedings. Two of the five judges dissent, concluding that the word 'pollutant' was defined and excluded cat urine odor.
New Hampshire General Laws 1878: Trespasses, Malicious Acts, etc.

The New Hampshire session laws from 1878, chapter 281, covers the state's cruelty to animals laws.  Specifically, the law covers cruelty to animals and the treatment of animals during transportation. 

New Hampshire Revised Statutes 1843: Offences Against Chastity, Decency and Morality

Section 12 of Chapter 219 from New Hampshire Revised Statutes of 1843 covers cruelty to animals.  Specifically, the statutes states what qualifies as cruelty to animals and the punishment for it.

NH - Agricultural Animals - Chapter 435. Animal Care, Breeding and Feed

This New Hampshire chapter concerns the registration of breeding stallions and the proper care, feeding, and shelter of horses. The chapter also includes the New Hampshire Commercial Feed Law of 1971. Within this law are prohibitions on the misbranding or adulteration of commercial feed. The chapter additionally prohibits the feeding of raw garbage to swine.

NH - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NH - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws

These New Hampshire statutes provide the animals anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions for the state.  Included are general anti-cruelty laws for any animal (including domestic and wild animals), exhibitions of fighting animals, provisions for protection of animals riding in motor vehicles, restrictions related to docking the tail of a horse, provisions for the use of animals in science classes or fairs, laws against maiming or willfully interfering with police dogs or horses,  laws related to the willful interference with organizations or projects involving animals, and provisions related to dogs riding in pick-up trucks.