Displaying 1 - 10 of 33
Titlesort descending Summary
Armstrong v. Riggi

Joe Riggi delivered his two unregistered Pomeranian dogs to the Armstrongs' Poodle Parlor to be bathed and groomed. The dogs died while in the care of the bailee. Riggi commenced this action to recover damages alleging that the dogs were worth more than $10,000. The issue on appeal was whether the trial court incorrectly interpreted the state court rule regarding attorney fees. Since the appellate court did in fact determine error, the case was remanded.

Detailed Discussion of Nevada Great Ape Laws The following article discusses Great Ape law in Nevada. Nevada does not have any laws that directly address the protection of great apes. While the state of Nevada controls possession and importation of native endangered species by law, great apes are not specifically identified or addressed. Nevada’s administrative code also exempts “monkeys and other primates” from the permitting requirements required for possession, transport, and sale of other wild animals. In addition to the lack of prohibition on private ownership of great apes, there is a list of commercial uses that are allowed. Like other states, Nevada does not define great apes as “endangered,” either under its own endangered species law or any regulations.
Gilman v. Nevada State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners

The Slensky's took their ill beagle to Defendant's Animal Hospital for routine vaccinations and examinations due to the dog's loose stools for four days.  X-rays of the dog were taken, and when the dog was returned to the Slensky's, where it then collapsed.  Defendant instructed them to take the dog to the emergency clinic, where it later died.  The family filed a complaint with the Nevada State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners, and Defendant was later convicted of gross negligence and incompetence, an ethics violation, and for using an unlicensed veterinary technician.  His license was suspended and he was placed on probation.  The Court held that Defendant:  (1) could be assessed costs of the proceeding; (2) he could not be assessed attorney's fees; (3) the Board could award expert witness fees above the statutory cap; (4) the Board failed to justify the imposition of costs for an investigator; and (5) statutes did not permit the employment of an unlicensed veterinary technician.

NV - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NV - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes

This comprehensive section comprises the Nevada anti-cruelty statutes.  The section first empowers private prevention of cruelty to animals societies and outlines their powers and responsibilities, including the power to arrest.  Under this section, "animal" does not include the human race, but includes every other living creature.  Animal cruelty, as described in Section 574.100, prohibits the overdriving, overloading, torture, cruel beating or unjustifiable injuring, maiming, mutilation or killing of an animal, as well as the deprivation of necessary sustenance, food or drink.  The first offense under this section is a misdemeanor with enhancement to a felony for a third or subsequent convictions.  Animals fighting is also prohibited under the section, with enhanced sentences for subsequent convictions.  Other specific crimes include mistreatment of dogs, abandonment of animals, poisoning (although the section does not prohibit the destruction of "noxious animals"), and basic requirements for the care of dogs and cats kept in kennels or sold by pounds or pet shops.

NV - Damages, pet - 41.740. Damages for which person who kills or injures pet of another person is liable; punitive and noneconomic damages may not be awarded; limitation on amount of damages; exceptions This Nevada law provides that if a "natural person" intentionally, willfully, recklessly or negligently injures or kills the pet of another natural person, the person is liable for (a) the cost of veterinary care incurred because of the injury or death of the pet; (b) any reduction in market value of the pet caused by the injury; (c) the market value and reasonable burial expenses if the pet is killed; and (d) reasonable attorney's fees and costs incurred in bringing an action under this section. All the damages must not exceed $5,000 per pet. There are several exceptions under the law. A pet is defined as any domesticated dog or cat normally maintained in or near the household of its owner.
NV - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 202. Crimes Against Public Health and Safety.

This Nevada statute defines a "dangerous dog," as a dog, that without provocation, on two separate occasions within 18 months, behaved menacingly to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend him or herself against substantial bodily harm, when the dog is either off the premises of its owner or keeper or not confined in a cage or pen.  A dog then becomes "vicious" when, without being provoked, it killed or inflicted substantial bodily harm upon a human being. 

If substantial bodily harm results from an attack by a dog known to be vicious, its owner or keeper is guilty of a category D felony.  Under the statute, a dog may not be declared dangerous if it attacks as a defensive act against a person who was committing or attempting to commit a crime or who provoked the dog.

NV - Disaster - Chapter 414. Emergency Management. General Provisions.

In Nevada, an emergency management plan must address the needs of persons with pets or service animals during and after an emergency or disaster.

NV - Disaster Planning - State Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (SCEMP)

According to the Division of Emergency Management - Homeland Security, "The objective of the State Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (SCEMP) is to reduce the possible consequences of an emergency by preventing loss of life and injuries; reducing damage to infrastructure, buildings, and homes; thus accelerating the resumption of normal daily life activities; and to the maximum extent possible, protect the environment." The plan contains several references to both service animals and household pets, which are excerpted below.

NV - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws

These statutes comprise Nevada's dog laws.  Among the provisions include a link to proper care requirements for companion animals, animal control ordinance provisions, and the dangerous dog law among others.