Louisiana

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Leger v. Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries


Alex Leger instituted this action against the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission and Burton Angelle, in his capacity as Commissioner of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, to recover damages for the loss of his 1973 sweet potato crop.  Leger's primary contention was that, since the State of Louisiana is the owner of all wild quadrupeds according to statute, it is legally responsible for damages done to his potato crop.  The court held that the statutory  language compels the conclusion that the state's ownership is in a sovereign, and not a proprietary, capacity.  Thus, the nature of the ownership is as a trustee and the management duties are carried out under police power authority.  The court found nothing in the cited statutes or in the law which indicates that the state has a duty to harbor wild birds or wild quadrupeds, to control their movements or to prevent them from damaging privately owned property.

LA - Veterinary - Veterinarians.


These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

LA - Veterinarian Immnity - Chapter 20. Miscellaneous Provisions Common to Certain Professions.

This law reflects Louisiana's good Samaritan provision. Under the law, a licensed veterinarian licensed under who in good faith gratuitously (without payment) renders emergency care or services or assistance at the scene of an emergency to an animal is not liable for any civil damages as a result of any act or omission in rendering the care or services or assistance.

LA - Vehicle, animal - § 1738.1. Immunity from liability; gratuitous emergency care to domestic animal This 2018 Louisiana law states that there shall be no liability on the part of a person for property damage or trespass to a motor vehicle, if the damage was caused while the person was rescuing an animal in distress. The person must first do the following: (1) make a good-faith attempt to locate the owner before forcibly entering the vehicle (based on the circumstances); (2) contact local law enforcement/911 before forcibly entering; (3) determine the vehicle is locked and has a good-faith belief there is no other reasonable means for the animal to be removed; (3) believe that removal of the animal is necessary because the animal is in imminent danger of death; (4) use no more force than necessary to rescue the animal; (5) place a notice on the windshield providing details including contact information and the location of the animal; and (6) remain with the animal in a safe location reasonably close to the vehicle until first responders arrive. For purposes of the law, "animal” means any cat or dog kept for pleasure, companionship, or other purposes that are not purely commercial.
LA - Trust - § 2263. Trust for the care of an animal This law enacted in 2015 allows the creation of a trust may to provide for the care of one or more animals that are "in being and ascertainable" on the date of the creation of the trust. The trust may designate a caregiver for each animal. The trust terminates on the death of the last surviving animal named in the trust. The "comments" that follow the statutory language provide some interesting explanation of several provisions of the new law.
LA - Rabies Immunization- Chapter 1. Anti-Rabies Vaccination Requirements for Dogs and Cats These regulations are Louisiana's rabies provisions. Under the chapter, a person is prohibited from keeping a dog, cat, or ferret over the age of three months that has not been vaccinated against rabies by a licensed veterinarian.
LA - Ordinances - CHAPTER 18. ANIMALS RUNNING AT LARGE.



This Louisiana statute provides that the governing bodies of all parishes and municipalities may impose license taxes on all dogs, enact ordinances for the regulation of dogs running at large, and maintain pounds for the impounding of dogs.

LA - Morgan City - Breed - Sec. 18-65. Pit bulls prohibited.


Morgan City, Louisiana makes it unlawful to own, possess, keep, exercise control over, maintain, harbor, transport, or sell any pit bull, with exceptions.  For example, if the owner has a permit for a pit bull on or before July 25, 2006, who has a pit bull license, and who maintains the pit bull in compliance with the pit bull license requirements, may keep a pit bull within the city. If the owner does not comply with the requirements, the pit bull could be impounded and destroyed.

LA - Lien, veterinary - § 4661. Feed, medicine, and veterinary services for horses

This Louisiana law comprises the state's veterinary lien law, which relates only to services provided on horses. Any person who furnishes feed or medicines for a horse or horses, or any licensed veterinarian who furnishes medical services for a horse or horses, to or upon the order of the owner, has a privilege for the unpaid portion of the price thereof upon the horse or horses of the owner, which received the feed, medicine, or medical services.

LA - Leash - Chapter 23. Louisiana White Cane Law.


This Louisiana leash law provides that 

“any person who purposely or negligently injures an assistance dog or any owner of a dog who allows that dog to injure an assistance dog because he fails to control or leash the dog shall also be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.”  That person shall also be liable for any injuries to the assistance dog and, if necessary, the replacement and compensation for the loss of the assistance dog and attorney fees.

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